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Dense breast tissue drives early stages of cancer, new study finds
Medical News Today
Scientists at the University of Manchester in the U.K. think that a key biological mechanism may explain for the first time why women with dense breast tissue have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. "We know that high breast density can greatly increase a woman's breast cancer risk as well as other factors such as aging, family history, and presence of mutations in genes such as BRCA 1 and BRCA 2," said University of Manchester professor Michael Lisanti.
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Prostate cancer risk not lowered by statins
Renal and Urology News
Statin use is not associated with prostate cancer risk in men regularly screened for the malignancy, according to investigators. Elizabeth A. Platz, ScD, MPH, of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Md., and colleagues studied 9,457 men aged 55 years or older who were enrolled in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Over seven years of follow-up, use of a statin was not associated with PCa risk overall or the risk of lower- or higher-grade PCa, Dr. Platz's group reported online ahead of print in The Journal of Urology.
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Special glasses help surgeons 'see' cancer
Washington University in St. Louis
High-tech glasses developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may help surgeons visualize cancer cells, which glow blue when viewed through the eyewear. The wearable technology, so new it’s yet unnamed, was used during surgery for the first time Feb. 10 at Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine.
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New CoC Standards manual (Version 1.2.1) is now available for download
CoC Source
Late in 2013, the Accreditation Committee approved important changes to Standard 1.3 that will affect all CoC-accredited programs and new programs working toward accreditation. This communication outlines several changes to this standard. A new CoC Standards manual (Version 1.2.1) is now available for download through the CoC website at http://www.facs.org/cancer/coc/programstandards2012.html. Replacement pages for version 1.2 can also be downloaded from the same page. All changes were effective Jan.1; therefore, we encourage you to read this communication, the new standard‘s definition and requirements, and the ratings in Version 1.2.1 so that the changes can be addressed at your first quarter cancer committee meeting in 2014.
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Cancer survivors send distress call
Medscape (login required)
It is considered a standard of good-quality cancer care to address the psychosocial health needs of cancer patients and cancer survivors, and to provide appropriate psychosocial health services. However, health care providers do not consistently recognize, adequately treat, or refer patients to services that could meet their psychosocial needs. Laura P. Forsythe, PhD, MPH, and colleagues recently published a study that examined this issue from the point of view of cancer survivors. Medscape Oncology recently spoke with Dr. Forsythe about the findings of this study and its implications for the care of cancer survivors.
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Lightwaves improve brain tumor surgery
Oncology Nurse Advisor
First-of-its-kind research shows promise for developing a method to clearly identify cancerous tissue during surgery. These findings may potentially improve outcomes for those undergoing surgery to remove glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a tumor that attacks tissue around nerve cells in the brain. GBM is a type of brain tumor that is both common and deadly.
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Latest research offers promise in detection of pancreatic cancer
By Rosemary Sparacio
Pancreatic cancer causes more than 38,000 deaths in the U.S. each year and is the fourth-most common cause of cancer deaths in the western world. No routine screening methods for pancreatic cancer are available, due to the subtle differences among cancerous, atypical, and healthy tissue. Recently, however, two studies have identified biomarkers that show potential as a method for early detection of pancreatic cancer.
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CMS launches comment period for lung cancer screening
Medscape (login required)
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) might be moving closer to covering lung cancer screening for high-risk individuals. On Feb. 10, the agency opened a 30-day public comment period, which is part of the decision-making process regarding coverage. The move follows the issuance of guidelines by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) at the end of last year, which recommend annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for adults 55 to 80 years of age who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or who quit in the previous 15 years.
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New Ohio law incorporates NAPBC standards
ACS
A law that incorporates the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) standards relating to mastectomy and reconstructive surgery will take effect in Ohio on March 20. Under this law, also known as the Lizzie B. Byrd Act, a surgeon, or a health care professional designated by a surgeon, who performs a mastectomy in a hospital must guide the patient through provided or referred services in a manner consistent with NAPBC standards.
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FDA expands ibrutinib approval to include chronic lymphocytic leukemia
The Oncology Report
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of ibrutinib (Imbruvica) for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who have undergone at least one prior therapy, the agency announced Feb. 12. The FDA’s expanded approval is based on a study of 48 CLL patients who had received previous therapy, the agency said in a statement. On average, participants were diagnosed 6.7 years before the study and had received four therapies prior to ibrutinib.
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Masectomy risk reduced by external beam radiation for invasive breast cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Standard external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) provided a higher breast preservation rate than brachytherapy in women 66 years and older with invasive breast cancer, according to new research. Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular treatment protocol for breast cancer; however, there is conflicting data regarding its effectiveness. In addition, published suitability criteria directing patient selection for brachytherapy have not been empirically validated. This study compared the long-term likelihood of breast preservation, risks of postoperative complications and local toxicities, and validity of suitability categories of three treatment strategies after lumpectomy: EBRT, brachytherapy, and no radiation.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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