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Blueprint for action issued to combat oncology drug shortages
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A group of prominent health care experts, including bioethicists, pharmacists, policymakers, and cancer specialists, have proposed concrete steps for preventing and managing a nightmare scenario that is becoming all too common: shortages of life-saving drugs. In a consensus statement published in Pediatrics, the experts said they sought to move away from the current strategy of reaction to shortages once they have occurred and focus instead on prevention. Using the example of shortages of chemotherapy drugs used for treating children with cancer — therapies proven to have high survival rates for the most common childhood cancers — the group developed a comprehensive blueprint for action they say is critical for managing and preventing future drug shortages.
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Avoiding cSMG during radiation therapy is safe in head and neck cancer patients
News-Medical.net
Researchers conducted a retrospective analysis of 71 patients from two facilities — the University of Colorado Cancer Center and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The median patient age was 55, and about 50 percent of the patients were current or former smokers. Forty patients had primary tonsil cancers, and 31 patients had tumors involving the base of the tongue. About 80 percent of patients had N2b or greater disease (meaning extensive lymph node involvement), and 90 percent of patients had overall stage IV disease (indicating advanced cancer). The analysis only included patients who were receiving treatment to the bilateral neck.
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The Women's Choice Award recognizes America's best breast centers
PRWeb
Breast cancer is the second most common form of cancer among American women according to the American Cancer Society, and one in eight women in the U.S. will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. Fortunately, earlier detection through screening, increased awareness and improved treatment have all contributed to a decline in deaths due to breast cancer. The Women’s Choice Award is proud to announce the 2014 winners of America’s Best Breast Centers — acknowledging the centers’ dedication to providing exceptional patient care and treatment.
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More breast cancer patients choosing reconstructive surgery, study finds
HealthDay News via Web MD
More breast cancer patients are choosing reconstructive breast surgery, although where women live might influence whether they opt for it, new research shows. According to the study, which was published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, there was an almost 20 percent jump in reconstructive breast surgeries between 1998 and 2007 among women who had a breast removed due to breast cancer (a procedure called mastectomy).
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New CoC Standards manual (Version 1.2.1) is now available for download
CoC Source
Late in 2013, the Accreditation Committee approved important changes to Standard 1.3 that will affect all CoC-accredited programs and new programs working toward accreditation. This communication outlines several changes to this standard. A new CoC Standards manual (Version 1.2.1) is now available for download through the CoC website at http://www.facs.org/cancer/coc/programstandards2012.html. Replacement pages for Version 1.2 can also be downloaded from the same page. All changes were effective Jan.1; therefore, we encourage you to read this communication, the new standard‘s definition and requirements, and the ratings in Version 1.2.1 so that the changes can be addressed at your first quarter cancer committee meeting in 2014.
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Young adults with secondary thyroid cancer may have greater risk of dying
News-Medical.net
A new analysis has found that adolescents and young adults who develop thyroid cancer as a secondary cancer have a significantly greater risk of dying than those with primary thyroid cancer. Published online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings stress the importance of screening young cancer survivors to detect early signs of a potentially life-threatening thyroid malignancy.
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Selenium and vitamin E supplements 'increase prostate cancer risk'
Medical News Today
A new study recently published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that taking high doses of selenium and vitamin E supplements may increase the risk of prostate cancer, depending on a man's selenium levels prior to taking the supplements. The research team, including first author Dr. Alan Kristal of the Public Health Sciences Division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash., analyzed 1,739 patients with prostate cancer and 3,117 matched controls from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT).
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New Ohio law incorporates NAPBC standards
ACS
A law that incorporates the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) standards relating to mastectomy and reconstructive surgery will take effect in Ohio on March 20. Under this law, also known as the Lizzie B. Byrd Act, a surgeon, or a health care professional designated by a surgeon, who performs a mastectomy in a hospital must guide the patient through provided or referred services in a manner consistent with NAPBC standards.
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Can aspirin fight cancer?
The Boston Globe
Aspirin, a medicine cabinet staple for fighting heart attacks and headaches, is also a powerful weapon against cancer, a growing body of research shows. The groups most likely to benefit from aspirin’s anti-cancer powers, research suggests, are those at extra risk for colon cancer and people between ages 50 and 75, said Dr. Andrew Chan, a gastroenterologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. Those older than 75 are at higher risk for aspirin’s side effects, and people younger than 50 stand to benefit less from its cancer-fighting effects, he said.
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Obesity in men could dictate future colon screenings
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Elevated levels of the fat hormone leptin, higher body mass index (BMI), and a larger waistline are associated with a greater likelihood of having colorectal polyps in men, according to a new study. These precancerous growths can lead to colon cancer. The result may put men at an even greater risk of the disease and also may mean their body weight could eventually be a deciding factor in whether a colonoscopy is in their future. Today, age and family history typically dictate a screening.
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The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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