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A faster way to try many drugs on many cancers
The New York Times
Chemotherapy and radiation failed to thwart Erika Hurwitz's rare cancer of white blood cells. So her doctors offered her another option, a drug for melanoma. The result was astonishing. Within four weeks, a red rash covering her body, so painful she had required a narcotic patch and the painkiller OxyContin, had vanished. Her cancer was undetectable. "It has been a miracle drug," said Hurwitz, 78, of Westchester County. She is part of a new national effort to try to treat cancer based not on what organ it started in, but on what mutations drive its growth.
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Metastatic breast cancer: Curing the incurable
Medscape
Metastatic breast cancer, the incurable form of the disease, takes a back seat at pink ribbon promotions where the emphasis is on cure. But metastatic disease does not take a back seat in research, where greater understanding of biology is giving rise to new therapies that extend survival.
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NCCS CEO applauds oncology care model
The Cancer Letter
The recent announcement by the Innovation Center at the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services regarding the launch of an Oncology Care Model is an important step toward patient-centered cancer care. In 2013, the Institute of Medicine released its report, "Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis." According to the Institute of Medicine, the American cancer care system is in crisis due to three failings: it is often not patient centered, does not provide well-coordinated care, and does not always encourage evidence-based treatment decisions.
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The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Workshop and Survey Savvy will be held in Chicago June 17- 19. The NCDB Workshop Maximizing NCDB Data to Improve Your Cancer Program will review the current uses and future updates for the NCDB quality tools. Major NCDB quality tools will be reviewed with a focus on how the data can be used to inform decisions for cancer program administration and by cancer physicians. Learn about the uses for the cancer registry and how patient navigators can use the data.

Survey Savvy provides in-depth review of the information your cancer committee needs to coordinate a high-quality, patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer program. Developed by Commission on Cancer (CoC) staff and CoC committee leadership, this program addresses your cancer program's most common questions, issues, and concerns regarding CoC standards and compliance.

Whether your cancer program is preparing for a re-accreditation survey or looking for clarification on the standards, this program provides increased understanding of standard requirements and implementation. Through lectures, panel presentations, and the opportunity to meet and speak with experts, cancer program members will learn how to use the CoC standards as a framework to develop a comprehensive cancer care program that delivers high-quality and patient-centered care. Plan now to attend these meetings.

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Joan Lunden paints a picture of breast cancer from the patient's perspective
OncLive
With a career as remarkable and distinguished as Joan Lunden's, it's really no surprise that she took on her latest challenge — a diagnosis of triple-negative breast cancer — with such determination and grace. Lunden's keynote address, which received an unprecedented standing ovation from a packed audience at the Miami Breast Cancer Conference, continued that tradition, as she spoke powerfully and from the heart in a talk perfectly aligned with the meeting's focus on the patient perspective.
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Healthy-looking prostate cells mask cancer-causing mutations
Cancer Reseearch UK
Prostate cells that look normal under the microscope may be hiding genetic mutations that could develop into cancer, prompting new ways to improve treatment for the disease, according to research published in Nature Genetics. The research — funded by Cancer Research UK, the Dallaglio Foundation and the Wellcome Trust — shows that in some men who have prostate cancer, non-cancerous prostate cells that appear normal under the microscope can have lots of different genetic mutations.
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Cancer prehabilitation: Moving from primary care to oncology
The Clinical Advisor
The Clinical Advisor asked Dr. Julie Silver this question: What is the role of primary care nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the cancer prehabilitation process? Here is Silver's response. 

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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BLOOD CANCER.


Pursuing Excellence through NAPBC Accreditation approved for 6.5 CEs from NCRA
Plan now to join us on April 24 at the Westin Westminster Denver-Boulder Hotel for the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) Pursuing Excellence through NAPBC Accreditation workshop. Attending this program — taught by experienced NAPBC committee members, board members, surveyors and staff — will give you the knowledge to develop and operate a high-quality breast center and achieve and maintain NAPBC accreditation. Registration for this program is now open.
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Understanding breast cancer screening recommendations
Corrections.com
Dr. Jeffrey E. Keller writes: "Who knew that setting up a breast cancer screening program for corrections could be such a big deal? Fortunately, I don’t have to deal with screening mammograms much in my jails. But we have been wrestling with this subject for some time in the prison systems I am affiliated with. And for prisons, setting up an appropriate breast cancer screening program is indeed a 'big deal' with both medical and legal implications."
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New HPV vaccination offers better cancer prevention, but will people take it?
Care2
Could we cut down on nearly 30,000 cases of cancer in the United States each year by simply taking a shot? It seems we've come one step closer to that goal. Gardasil, well known for their HPV vaccination, is coming out with a new version of the vaccine that now protects against 90 percent of all HPV strains.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    American Society of Clinical Oncology endorses American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines (Prostate Cancer News Today)
Screening for psychosocial distress: A review (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
New screening tests for hard-to-spot breast cancers (The Wall Street Journal)
Five cancer detection tests for early prevention (EmpowHER)
Heart health after cancer: A growing concern (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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