This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Mar. 13, 2013


 

Widespread flaws found in ovarian cancer treatment
The New York Times
Most women with ovarian cancer receive inadequate care and miss out on treatments that could add a year or more to their lives, a new study has found. The results highlight what many experts say is a neglected problem: widespread, persistent flaws in the care of women with this disease, which kills 15,000 a year in the United States.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement


Registration now open for Pursuing Excellence through Accreditation workshop
National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers
Registration is now open for the National Accreditation Program for Breast Center one-day workshop — Pursuing Excellence through Accreditation at the American College of Surgeons' headquarters in Chicago on Friday, May 24. This workshop will provide detailed information related to the NAPBC components and standards, survey process, the quality measures and related requirements for 2013 and beyond. Attendance at this workshop will assist centers applying for accreditation, as well as centers due for reaccreditation in 2013. If you have questions, please contact the NAPBC office at 312-202-5185, or by email at napbc@facs.org. Online registration is now open.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Proton therapy center in Seattle promises better cancer outcomes
Bonneville Seattle
Until now, cancer patients in the Seattle area had to travel 1,000 miles for specialty radiation treatment that kills tumors with great precision, while sparing healthy tissue and organs. It's called proton therapy and the first treatment center of its kind in the Northwest has just opened in Seattle.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Save the date for Survey Savvy 2013
Commission on Cancer
Plan to attend the Commission on Cancer Survey Savvy education program June 27-28 in Chicago. Developed to provide information and tools for meeting the standard, the program highlights a variety of successful strategies implemented by facilities to meet the patient-focused and quality standards. Panel presenters will facilitate a series of breakout sessions where participants will be engaged in developing an action plan to address challenging issues in their cancer program. Additional information on the program will be available soon.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Breast cancer treatment halts bone metastases, protects bones
Medical Xpress
A team of researchers have discovered two further positive effects of the drug Everolimus, which is already being used successfully as a hormone treatment for breast cancer.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Survey Savvy Preconference RQRS Workshop
Commission on Cancer
Commission on Cancer accredited programs have access to a number of data tools. Make sure that you are taking full advantage of the information available from the Rapid Quality Reporting System by attending this important half-day preconference in Chicago on June 26. Learn how to navigate the system, how to use the system for quality improvement and how current users have successfully implemented and use RQRS within their cancer programs. Additional information on this preconference and Survey Savvy will be available soon.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Grappling with healthcare upheaval
Onc Live
Oncology leaders are bracing for a host of changes in the healthcare system, not only as a result of the recently upheld insurance reform legislation but also because of continued pressure to control the ever-rising cost of cancer care.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Can aspirin keep skin cancer at bay?
TIME
The latest study suggests that the popular pain killer can inhibit melanoma. In the largest investigation of its kind, published in the journal Cancer, researchers found that women who regularly take aspirin have a decreased risk of developing melanoma, and that the protection may be cumulative — the longer they take it, the lower their risk.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New understanding in spread of cancer around the body reported
Medical Xpress
A new research study has investigated how cancer cells "hijack" platelets, enabling cancer to spread around the body and promoting the growth of new tumors. The findings of this significant new study will inform the development of novel anti-cancer drugs.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Fearing cancer, woman with Lynch Syndrome removes colon
ABC News
Even though she showed no signs of cancer at all, Fisher, 51, a former mental health worker, agreed to undergo what might sound like a radical surgery: doctors removed nearly her whole colon and rerouted her small intestine to perform the functions of her large intestine.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Spiritual beliefs can positively affect cancer care
eMaxhealth.com
Spirituality means something different to everyone, but in cancer care, being spiritual can have a powerful positive effect on your outcome. Researchers with the Washington University School of Medicine have found that ovarian cancer patients had less stress and depression plus lower levels of certain factors related to tumor growth.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Cancer research breakthrough on gene risk
news.com.au
In coming months doctors at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Australia will be able to tell many patients for the first time why they suffered breast cancer — and whether they need pre-emptive treatment to stop it returning. The hospital recently gained ethical approval to begin telling some patients that no major genetic pattern was found to lead to their cancer.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 
Advertisement




The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Andrew Plock, Content Editor, 469.420.2609  
Contribute news

Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the The CoC Brief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

Recent issues

March 6, 2013
Feb. 20, 2013
Feb. 12, 2013






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063