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Diabetes quadruples early death risk for cancer patients
Endocrinology Update
Cancer patients with preexisting diabetes have a significantly higher risk of early death, new research shows, prompting calls for closer collaboration between endocrinologists and oncologists. In a study of more than 420,000 patients, Danish researchers discovered that cancer patients with diabetes who were treated with insulin were four times more likely to die prematurely than those not treated with insulin. Risk of early death was highest when diabetes and cancer diagnoses occurred within one year, the study authors noted in this week’s Diabetologia.
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Personalized medicine is the ideal way to treat cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Assessing the route to cancer on a case-by-case basis might make more sense than basing a patient's cancer treatment on commonly disrupted genes and pathways, according to a new study. Most cancers begin similarly, with many possible routes to the same disease. The study found little or no overlap in the most prominent genetic malfunction associated with each individual patient's disease compared with malfunctions shared among the group of cancer patients as a whole.
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Version 3 of the CP³R now available
ACS
The latest version of the Cancer Program Practice Profile Reports (CP³R)has been posted with the following features:
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More breast cancer survivors opting for reconstruction
USA Today
According to the American Cancer Society, 235,030 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and 40,430 will die from the disease. For survivors who undergo a mastectomy, life after cancer can be especially hard, mentally and physically, as they deal with a new body image. A new study by researchers from private practices and academic medical centers shows that more women are receiving breast reconstruction after mastectomies, but the rates also vary dramatically based on geographic location.
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Newer radiation therapy treats prostate cancer more quickly
HealthDay News via Philly.com
A newer form of radiation therapy for prostate cancer is faster and less expensive, but it can cause more urinary complications, a new study suggests. The newer therapy delivers a greater dose of radiation per treatment than standard radiation therapy, which means prostate cancer patients can complete an entire course of treatment in one to two weeks instead of seven to nine weeks. There have, however, been few studies comparing the costs and side effects of the two methods.
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Register now for the 2014 CoC workshop — Strengthening Your Cancer Program...Enriching the Coordinators' Role
Commission on Cancer
On June 19-20 in Chicago, the Commission on Cancer (CoC) will hold a new workshop entitled Strengthening Your Cancer Program…Enriching the Coordinators' Role. This program provides information and case studies on the roles and responsibilities of the various CoC-designated coordinators. The two-day program will cover what the various coordinators' roles are, what their roles on the cancer committee involve, and how to meet and improve the required responsibilities based on the CoC Standards. Register for the program. Program fees are $650 if registration is received on or before May 15 and $750 if registration is received after May 15.
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BRCA and risk for ovarian cancer: There's more to the story
Medscape (login required)
A paper published in the November 2013 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, "Oral Contraceptives and Risk of Ovarian Cancer and Breast Cancer Among High-Risk Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis," directly addressed this question. In looking at a number of papers that had been published in the literature, this meta-analysis revealed, very importantly, that in fact the data suggest a similar degree of protection against the development of ovarian cancer, compared with the baseline risk in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, with the use of oral contraceptives.
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Findings reveal potential drug targets for small cell lung cancer
News-Medical.net
Cancer cells undergo extensive genetic alterations as they grow and spread through the body. Some of these mutations, known as "drivers," help spur cells to grow out of control, while others ("passengers") are merely along for the ride. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) cancer biologists at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and geneticists from the Broad Institute have now performed the most comprehensive analysis to date of these changes in mice programmed to develop cancer. The team discovered mutations and other genetic disturbances that arise at certain stages of lung cancer development; the researchers were also able to identify tumor cells that broke free to spread to other organs.
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Register now — Strengthening Your Cancer Program... Utilizing the Rapid Quality Reporting System to Comply with the New Commendation Standard
Commission on Cancer
Strengthening Your Cancer Program...Utilizing the Rapid Quality Reporting System to Comply with the New Commendation Standard will be held on June 18 in Chicago, the day before the 2014 CoC Workshop. This workshop will provide important information to help your program comply with the new commendation standard that requires programs, from initial enrollment and throughout the three-year accreditation period, to participate in Rapid Quality Reporting System (RQRS). Register now for the program; registration fees are $250 if registration is received on or before May 15 and $300 if registration is received after May 15, 2014.
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Study finds CT scans predict chemotherapy response in pancreatic cancer
Medical Xpress
Computed tomography (CT) scans routinely taken to guide the treatment of pancreatic cancer may provide an important secondary benefit. According to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the scans also reflect how well chemotherapy will penetrate the tumor, predicting the effectiveness of treatment. The research, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, is the first human study to address the issue of chemotherapy delivery to pancreatic tumors, a problem previously shown in animal studies.
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The Recovery Room Show — New episode available
ACS
You understand health, but do you understand medicine? Making sense of modern medicine, The Recovery Room, supported by the American College of Surgeons and hosted by Frederick L. Greene, MD, FACS, is an audio conversation with experts in surgery, medicine, ethics, and public health about the latest developments in medicine and health care. The latest episode, "Smoking Cessation and the Surgical Patient," is now available. It features Eric Skipper, MD, FACS, chief of adult cardiothoracic surgery at the Sanger Heart & Vascular Institute, Charlotte, N.C., and Michael Rosen, MD, FACS, professor of surgery and chief of GI and general surgery at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
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Secondary thyroid cancer more deadly than primary malignancy in younger patients
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A new analysis has found that adolescents and young adults who develop thyroid cancer as a secondary cancer have a significantly greater risk of dying than those with primary thyroid cancer. The findings stress the importance of screening young cancer survivors to detect early signs of a potentially life-threatening thyroid malignancy. Thyroid cancer is one of the five most common malignancies in adolescent and young adult patients (15 to 39 years). It can develop as an initial cancer or, rarely, after treatment for a previous cancer.
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National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers presents the Pursuing Excellence through Accreditation Workshop
NAPBC
Plan now to attend the Pursuing Excellence through Accreditation Workshop May 23 in Chicago. Designed for centers seeking accreditation for the first time as well as centers due for re-accreditation, this program will increase your understanding of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) accreditation process and help you prepare for the survey visit. Space is limited, so please make sure you register early.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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