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Personalized cancer vaccines have already helped treat three patients
The Washington Post
One day, cancer treatment regimens might include vaccines specially tailored to each patient. In a small preliminary study published recently in Science, researchers report successful use of these vaccines in three patients. To help these melanoma patients fight off their cancer, the researchers sequenced the genomes of their tumors.
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Cancer prevention efforts in the US a mixed bag
American Cancer Society
While there has been substantial progress in some cancer control efforts in the past several decades, including reductions in smoking and increased utilization of cancer screening, progress in some areas is lagging, according to a new report. Among the areas of most concern: smoking rates among certain populations, obesity, indoor tanning and low utilization of a new vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV), which causes cervical and other cancers. Additionally, colorectal cancer screening, which not only detects tumors early but also may prevent cancer from developing, is underutilized, particularly among the uninsured.
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Free CME from the CDC colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer: Optimizing quality
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Are your patients getting the maximum benefit from colorectal cancer screening? A new free continuing education course, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), provides guidance and tools for clinicians on the optimal ways to implement screening to help ensure that patients do receive maximum benefit. This course was developed by nationally recognized experts in colorectal cancer screening, including gastroenterologists, primary care clinicians and leaders in public health programs and research. It is narrated by David Lieberman, MD, Oregon Health and Science University, member of the Governing Board of the AGA and a past president of the ASGE.
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Study: Circulating tumor DNA in blood can predict recurrence of the most common type of lymphoma
Pharmabiz.com
Measurement of circulating tumor DNA in blood can be used to detect disease recurrence in patients with a curable form of cancer known as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In most patients, measurement of ctDNA enabled detection of microscopic disease before it could be seen on computerized tomography scans, which is the current standard for disease assessment.
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Pursuing Excellence through NAPBC Accreditation approved for 6.5 CEs from NCRA
Plan now to join us on April 24 at the Westin Westminster Denver-Boulder Hotel for the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) Pursuing Excellence through NAPBC Accreditation workshop. Attending this program — taught by experienced NAPBC committee members, board members, surveyors and staff — will give you the knowledge to develop and operate a high-quality breast center and achieve and maintain NAPBC accreditation. Registration for this program is now open.
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Dr. Douglas Lowy assumes helm at National Cancer Institute
Medscape
Dr. Douglas Lowy, whose research helped lay the groundwork for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, has taken over the helm of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as acting director. He succeeds Dr. Harold Varmus who announced his resignation earlier this month. Lowy had served as the NCI's deputy director since 2010.
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What's the breast cancer fight costing us?
NBC News
False-positive mammograms, which suggest a woman has breast cancer when she actually doesn't, cost the nation $4 billion a year, new research shows. A second study, also released recently, shows that new treatments for women who really do have breast cancer may cost more, but they are helping patients survive longer than older treatments.
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Skin cancer removal with miniaturized radiation
The Wall Street Journal via Fox News
Toni Weiser is a veteran of skin cancer removals. The 75-year-old retired teacher in Santa Fe, New Mexico, says she's had at least eight basal and squamous cell cancers scraped, frozen and surgically excised from her arms, face and shoulders. When a basal cell cancer reappeared on Weiser's nose last year, her dermatologist suggested a new, painless, nonsurgical treatment and she eagerly agreed.
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Register now for the NCDB Workshop and Survey Savvy
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Workshop and Survey Savvy will be held in Chicago June 17-19. The NCDB Workshop, Maximizing NCDB Data to Improve Your Cancer Program, will review the current uses and future updates for the NCDB quality tools. Major NCDB quality tools will be reviewed with a focus on how the data can be used to inform decisions for cancer program administration and by cancer physicians. Learn about the uses for the cancer registry and how patient navigators can use the data.

Survey Savvy provides in-depth review of the information your cancer committee needs to coordinate a high-quality, patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer program. Developed by Commission on Cancer (CoC) staff and CoC committee leadership, this program addresses your cancer program's most common questions, issues and concerns regarding CoC standards and compliance.

Whether your cancer program is preparing for a re-accreditation survey or looking for clarification on the standards, this program provides increased understanding of standard requirements and implementation. Through lectures, panel presentations and the opportunity to meet and speak with experts, cancer program members will learn how to use the CoC standards as a framework to develop a comprehensive cancer care program that delivers high-quality and patient-centered care. Plan now to attend these meetings.

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Many cancers harness cells' powerhouses to fuel tumor growth
Medical News Today
Cancer is what happens when abnormal cells grow in an uncontrolled way. Not all cell abnormalities are tied to or lead to cancer, and scientists are constantly trying to discover which do and which do not. Now, in a new breakthrough, researchers suggest targeting a type of abnormality that causes mitochondria to deform and divide unnaturally may block the growth of tumors in many common cancers.
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Help the CoC demonstrate how accreditation makes a difference
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC) is looking for your help. We are collecting evidence to demonstrate how CoC accreditation has improved patient outcomes and/or that your patients are receiving high-quality care and/or that your patients are more satisfied with their cancer care because they are cared for in a Commission on Cancer-accredited cancer program. Please send this information to srubin@facs.org.
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An audacious attempt to cure pancreatic cancer
Fortune
A small Boston-based biotech firm is teaming up with an array of hospitals and research teams to discover the first clinical biomarker to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer.
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Special study targeting cancer surveillance in CoC-accredited programs starts April 1
Improving the current approach to surveillance after active treatment for cancer has been identified as a priority area by a number of organizations, including the Institute of Medicine, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and DEcIDE Cancer Consortium. The current guidelines do not account for individual risk and are based on limited evidence. To help address this gap, a Commission on Cancer (CoC) Special Study was launched April 1 to investigate follow-up and recurrence after cancer treatment in hopes of tailoring follow-up based on individual risk.

Participation in this special study is required by all CoC accredited sites to fulfill Standard 5.7 (with the exception of Veterans Affairs facilities, pediatric facilities and facilities with a reference date after Jan. 1, 2008). The deadline for data submission is June 17, 2015. If this is the first you have heard of the study and want to know if your program's participation is required to meet Standard 5.7, please contact PCORIspecialstudy@facs.org.

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90 percent of all breast cancers can be detected with MRI
Medical Xpress
Around 90 percent of all breast cancers can be definitively diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Yet the combined methods of mammography and ultrasound yielded a detection rate of just 37.5 percent. This comparison is the key finding of a study published in the highly respected Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How men can protect against cancer (TIME)
Most women with early-stage breast cancer avoid extensive lymph node removal, showing increasing adherence to scientific evidence that a radical operation is no longer necessary (ACS)
Progress in battling advanced ovarian cancer (U.S. News & World Report)
Experts: Breast cancer 'is not a single disease' (Medical News Today)
What the Goldilocks gene means for blood-based cancers (Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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