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Doctors applaud SGR bill's malpractice protection
Medscape
Medical groups are applauding the overwhelming vote in the U.S. Senate recently to prohibit plaintiffs from using a physician's performance on federal quality measures in a medical malpractice lawsuit. The provision included in the legislation to repeal the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula would stop plaintiffs from using a doctor's quality improvement performance as the sole basis for a medical liability lawsuit or to prove negligence.
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Cancer group clarifies confusing mammography recommendations
ABC News
Women between the ages of 40 and 49 should get a mammogram to screen for breast cancer if they've weighed the risks and benefits, the United States Preventative Services Task Force said in a statement. "The group's top-level recommendations that women should begin mammogram testing at age 50 and only schedule them every two years until about age 74 have not changed," Dr. Michael LeFevre, the immediate past chairman of the task force told ABC News. "We've also said in the past that the decision to start screening mammography in women prior to age 50 years should be an individual one," he added.
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New genetic tests for breast cancer hold promise
The New York Times
A Silicon Valley start-up with some big-name backers is threatening to upend genetic screening for breast and ovarian cancer by offering a test on a sample of saliva that is so inexpensive that most women could get it. At the same time, the nation's two largest clinical laboratories, Quest Diagnostics and LabCorp, normally bitter rivals, are joining with French researchers to pool their data to better interpret mutations in the two main breast cancer risk genes, known as BRCA1 and BRCA2.
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Register now for the NCDB Workshop and Survey Savvy
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Workshop and Survey Savvy will be held in Chicago June 17-19. The NCDB Workshop, Maximizing NCDB Data to Improve Your Cancer Program, will review the current uses and future updates for the NCDB quality tools. Major NCDB quality tools will be reviewed with a focus on how the data can be used to inform decisions for cancer program administration and by cancer physicians. Learn about the uses for the cancer registry and how patient navigators can use the data.

Survey Savvy provides in-depth review of the information your cancer committee needs to coordinate a high-quality, patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer program. Developed by Commission on Cancer (CoC) staff and CoC committee leadership, this program addresses your cancer program's most common questions, issues and concerns regarding CoC standards and compliance.

Whether your cancer program is preparing for a re-accreditation survey or looking for clarification on the standards, this program provides increased understanding of standard requirements and implementation. Through lectures, panel presentations and the opportunity to meet and speak with experts, cancer program members will learn how to use the CoC standards as a framework to develop a comprehensive cancer care program that delivers high-quality and patient-centered care. Plan now to attend these meetings.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  2015 International Cancer Education Conference

Preconference workshops on Brain Fog/Chemo Brain (Heather Palmer PhD), Cancer Culture & Literacy (Cathy Meade PhD, RN, FAAN) and more! Plenary sessions featuring David S. Alberts MD (University of Arizona Cancer Center), Diane Zipursky Quale JD (Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network), Judith S. Kaur MD (Mayo Clinic Cancer Center), and more!
 


Registrars earn 2 free CE hours by viewing AJCC Curriculum Webinar
If you missed the April 21 Module II Lesson 14 webinar, you can register to view the recorded webinar. Instructions are available to walk you through the process of reviewing the self-study lessons in preparation for watching the recorded webinar. Instructions are also available on how to obtain attendance documentation for the two CE hours. Register to view the Module I recorded webinar if you missed it since each module builds upon the previous one, and no information will be repeated. Go to the AJCC website for more information.
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Two-thirds of patients with invasive cancer likely to survive 5 years
Healio
Two out of three people diagnosed with invasive cancer survive at least five years, according to data published in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. However, survival varied according to cancer type, age at diagnosis and race, results showed.
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New blood test shows promise in cancer fight
The New York Times
In the usual cancer biopsy, a surgeon cuts out a piece of the patient's tumor, but researchers in labs across the country are now testing a potentially transformative innovation. They call it the liquid biopsy, and it is a blood test that has only recently become feasible with the latest exquisitely sensitive techniques. It is showing promise in finding tiny snippets of cancer DNA in a patient's blood.
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New 'Recovery Room' episode available — The Essential Relationship Between Surgeon and Pathologist
ACS
In this episode of "The Recovery Room," host Dr. Frederick Greene, FACS, speaks to Dr. Carolyn Compton, an academic pathologist at Arizona State University, and Dr. Terry Sarantou, FACS, a surgical oncologist at the Levine Cancer Institute, about the surgeon-pathologist relationship, each from the respective fields of surgery and pathology. Listen to this episode.
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Socioeconomic factors affect odds of death after a lung cancer operation
ACS
People with limited education and low income have higher odds of death within 30 days after undergoing an operation for lung cancer than those who are more educated and financially better off, according to new research published as an article in press on the website of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication later this year.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CANCER PREVENTION.


Help the CoC demonstrate how accreditation makes a difference
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC) is looking for your help. We are collecting evidence to demonstrate how CoC accreditation has improved patient outcomes and/or that your patients are receiving high-quality care and/or that your patients are more satisfied with their cancer care because they are cared for in a Commission on Cancer-accredited cancer program. Please send this information to srubin@facs.org.
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NIH scientists find genetic link for rare intestinal cancer
Pharmabiz.com
A research team at the National Institutes of Health found that heredity accounts for up to 35 percent of small intestinal carcinoid, a rare digestive cancer. The researchers examined families with a history of the disease. Because the disease has long been considered randomly occurring rather than inherited, people with a family history are not typically screened.
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New collaboration brings comprehensive genomic profiling to UC Davis
News-Medical.Net
The UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine have entered into a collaboration with Foundation Medicine, a leading molecular information company. The collaboration brings comprehensive genomic profiling into standard of care at UC Davis, allowing physicians to prescribe the most effective, targeted cancer treatments to patients based on the genomic information specific to each individual's cancer.
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Special study targeting cancer surveillance in CoC-accredited programs launched April 1
Improving the current approach to surveillance after active treatment for cancer has been identified as a priority area by a number of organizations, including the Institute of Medicine, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and DEcIDE Cancer Consortium. The current guidelines do not account for individual risk and are based on limited evidence. To help address this gap, a Commission on Cancer (CoC) Special Study was launched April 1 to investigate follow-up and recurrence after cancer treatment in hopes of tailoring follow-up based on individual risk.

Participation in this special study is required by all CoC-accredited sites to fulfill Standard 5.7 (with the exception of Veterans Affairs facilities, pediatric facilities and facilities with a reference date after Jan. 1, 2008). The deadline for data submission is June 17, 2015. If this is the first you have heard of the study and want to know if your program's participation is required to meet Standard 5.7, please contact PCORIspecialstudy@facs.org.

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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    CDC seeks young women to share personal stories in new breast cancer education campaign (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
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Muscle-building supplements 'increase risk of testicular cancer' (Newsweek)
Stimulating both major branches of the immune system halts tumor growth more effectively (Massachusetts Institute of Technology via Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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