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Colorectal cancer screening in older adults often inappropriate
Cancer Therapy Advisor
Older adults with limited life expectancy frequently receive colorectal cancer screening, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Mara A. Schonberg, M.D., M.P.H., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues examined CRC screening receipt according to age and LE in older adults in the United States.
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Exercise helps breast cancer patients tolerate chemotherapy; reduces fatigue, nausea and pain
Medical Daily
Physical activity — even low amounts of it — can make a huge difference for cancer patients suffering from the side effects of chemotherapy, a new study finds. While chemotherapy battles the cancer, it leaves patients with compromised immune systems and crushing fatigue, nausea and pain. At times, the chemotherapy side effects are so bad that cancer patients are unable to finish their chemo plan without adjusting the dose.
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CoC and NAPBC provide tools to observe National Cancer
Survivors Day

June 7 marks the 28th Annual National Cancer Survivors Day which brings cancer survivors together to show that there is life after receiving a diagnosis of cancer. The Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Programfor Breast Centers (NAPBC) encourage your program to observe this day and use this as an opportunity to display/promote your CoC and NAPBC accreditation status. To help you promote this event within your program and the community, the CoC and the NAPBC have developed a poster that you can download and print. Programs that hold CoC accreditation or have both CoC and NAPBC accreditations can access the poster by going to CoC Datalinks and clicking on Marketing Resources. For programs that are solely NAPBC accredited, please use the link to the Marketing Resources website provided in your performance report email notification. For more information, contact srubin@facs.org.
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Educational walk through a colon promotes colorectal cancer screening
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A walk-through colon is creating the buzz needed to help a hospital in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, achieve its goal of having 80 percent of the population screened for colon cancer by 2018, according to a presentation at the ONS 40th Annual Congress.
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Mammograms' efficiency at reading dense breasts debated
Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette
Terri Mallioux felt uneasy despite receiving a clean mammogram last year. Mallioux is one of the 40 percent of U.S. women the National Cancer Institute estimates have dense breast tissue, and she understands the difficulty it can cause. "A mammogram is a fabulous test, but it is not the only test for everyone," she said. "I knew over time it was very difficult to read my mammograms."
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'Chemo brain' is real, say researchers
University of British Columbia via Medical Xpress
UBC research shows that chemotherapy can lead to excessive mind wandering and an inability to concentrate. Dubbed "chemo brain," the negative cognitive effects of the cancer treatment have long been suspected, but the UBC study is the first to explain why patients have difficulty paying attention. Breast cancer survivors were asked to complete a set of tasks while researchers in the Departments of Psychology and Physical Therapy monitored their brain activity. What the researchers found is that the minds of people with chemo-brain lack the ability for sustained focused thought.
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Research: Removing ovaries during breast cancer could save lives
TIME
In women who have both breast cancer and the BRCA1 mutation, having surgery to remove the ovaries can significantly lower their risk of dying from the disease, suggests a new study published in the journal JAMA Oncology. Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutations have up to a 70 percent risk of getting breast cancer and a high risk for ovarian cancer.
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Register now for the NCDB Workshop and Survey Savvy
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Workshop and Survey Savvy will be held in Chicago June 17-19. The NCDB Workshop, Maximizing NCDB Data to Improve Your Cancer Program, will review the current uses and future updates for the NCDB quality tools. Major NCDB quality tools will be reviewed with a focus on how the data can be used to inform decisions for cancer program administration and by cancer physicians. Learn about the uses for the cancer registry and how patient navigators can use the data.

Survey Savvy provides in-depth review of the information your cancer committee needs to coordinate a high-quality, patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer program. Developed by Commission on Cancer (CoC) staff and CoC committee leadership, this program addresses your cancer program's most common questions, issues and concerns regarding CoC standards and compliance.

Whether your cancer program is preparing for a re-accreditation survey or looking for clarification on the standards, this program provides increased understanding of standard requirements and implementation. Through lectures, panel presentations and the opportunity to meet and speak with experts, cancer program members will learn how to use the CoC standards as a framework to develop a comprehensive cancer care program that delivers high-quality and patient-centered care. Plan now to attend these meetings.

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Public comment on draft recommendation statement: Screening for
breast cancer

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
Recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force posted its draft recommendation statement and draft evidence documents on screening for breast cancer for public comment. These materials are available for review and public comment from April 20 through May 18.
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Seeing the same doctor could affect time to cancer diagnosis
Cancer Research UK
Whether or not patients see the same GP could affect how quickly bowel and lung cancers are diagnosed, according to a Cancer Research UK study recently published in the British Journal of General Practice. Symptoms of lung and bowel cancer tended to be picked up more quickly if patients consulted an unknown doctor than if they saw their usual GP, the University of Bristol researchers found.
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Special study targeting cancer surveillance in CoC-accredited programs launched April 1
Improving the current approach to surveillance after active treatment for cancer has been identified as a priority area by a number of organizations, including the Institute of Medicine, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and DEcIDE Cancer Consortium. The current guidelines do not account for individual risk and are based on limited evidence. To help address this gap, a Commission on Cancer (CoC) Special Study was launched April 1 to investigate follow-up and recurrence after cancer treatment in hopes of tailoring follow-up based on individual risk.

Participation in this special study is required by all CoC-accredited sites to fulfill Standard 5.7 (with the exception of Veterans Affairs facilities, pediatric facilities and facilities with a reference date after Jan. 1, 2008). The deadline for data submission is June 17, 2015. If this is the first you have heard of the study and want to know if your program's participation is required to meet Standard 5.7, please contact PCORIspecialstudy@facs.org.

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Research team identifies master switch for cancer-causing HER2 protein
Mayo Clinic via Medical Xpress
Herceptin has been touted as a wonder drug for women with HER2-positive breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is fueled by excess production of the HER2 protein. However, not all of these patients respond to the drug, and many who do respond eventually acquire resistance.
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Hepatitis C linked to increased risk of liver cancer, other cancers
Medical News Today
Researchers have long known that patients with hepatitis C are at increased risk of liver cancer. But a new study recently presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's 50th International Liver Congress in Vienna, Austria, finds hepatitis C may also raise the risk of developing other cancers.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Doctors applaud SGR bill's malpractice protection (Medscape)
Cancer group clarifies confusing mammography recommendations (ABC News)
New genetic tests for breast cancer hold promise (The New York Times)
New blood test shows promise in cancer fight (The New York Times)
Two-thirds of patients with invasive cancer likely to survive 5 years (Healio)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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