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NIH study: Microchip captures clusters of circulating tumor cells
National Institutes of Health
Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health.
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Flatiron Health to incorporate NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates into OncoEMR®
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® is collaborating with Flatiron Health to integrate the NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates into the Flatiron Health OncoEMR® electronic health record, starting initially with breast, colon and nonsmall cell lung cancers, with plans to expand to additional tumor types.
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The CoC and the NAPBC are going social
Connect with the CoC and the NAPBC on Twitter. The CoC Twitter (COC-ACS) has been open for almost two months and has nearly 150 followers. The NAPBC Twitter (NAPBC_ACS) account opened almost a year ago and has more than 675 followers. Following the success of the NAPBC Twitter account, our newest social media endeavor is Facebook. Make sure you like the NAPBC Facebook page. If you have suggestions on ways to enhance your social media efforts please contact Susan Rubin.
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Veracyte lung cancer test could help avoid some risky biopsies
Business Insider via Reuters
A new diagnostic test from Veracyte Inc. could help many people avoid risky and costly invasive lung biopsies at a time when millions of American smokers are eligible for lung cancer screening, according to data from studies presented recently. The company's Percepta Bronchial Genomic Classifier takes cell samples from the windpipe of smokers during a bronchoscopy procedure and analyzes 23 genes for their reaction to exposure to cigarette toxins.
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Deadline for the Special Study Extended to July 15
Thanks to everyone for all of your hard work to date on the special study. We have been listening to your feedback about the study deadline. At this time we have decided to give an extension of four weeks. The new study deadline will be Wednesday, July 15. We appreciate your participation in the webinars and submitted questions to date. For those of you who have already submitted your cases, we appreciate your dedication. Thanks to your timeliness, we have been able to start looking at the data to help us understand post-treatment surveillance imaging patterns and recurrence in cancer patients across the country. Your help with this special study has the potential to inform guidelines for the post-treatment follow-up care of men and women diagnosed with cancer. Thank you for your time and all that you are doing to make this special study a success. Contact PCORIspecialstudy@facs.org with any questions.
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NCCN receives $2 million funding commitment from ImmunoGen Inc. to study mirvetuximab soravtansine for folate receptor alpha-positive cancers
National Comprehensive Cancer Network
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® Oncology Research Program has been awarded a $2 million grant from ImmunoGen Inc. to support the advancement of scientific knowledge related to mirvetuximab soravtansine (IMGN853), a potential new treatment for ovarian and other folate receptor alpha-positive cancers.
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CoC and NAPBC provide tools to observe National Cancer
Survivors Day

June 7 marks the 28th Annual National Cancer Survivors Day, which brings cancer survivors together to show that there is life after receiving a diagnosis of cancer. The Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) encourage your program to observe this day and use this as an opportunity to display/promote your CoC and NAPBC accreditation status. To help you promote this event within your program and the community, the CoC and the NAPBC have developed a poster that you can download and print. Programs that hold CoC accreditation or have both CoC and NAPBC accreditations can access the poster by going to CoC Datalinks and clicking on Marketing Resources. For programs that are solely NAPBC accredited, please use the link to the Marketing Resources website provided in your performance report email notification. For more information, contact srubin@facs.org.
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Study suggests dense breast tissue isn't always a high cancer risk
The New York Times
A new study offers help to patients and doctors who are trying to deal with mammogram results that many women consider troubling and confusing: the finding of "dense" breast tissue. Not only is breast density linked to an increased risk of cancer, it also makes cancer harder to detect because dense tissue can hide tumors from X-rays. But the new research indicates that not all women with dense breasts are at very high risk.
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MRI screening may help in breast cancer development prediction
Cancer Therapy Advisor
Among high-risk women undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening, those with background parenchymal enhancement are nine times more likely to develop breast cancer over the next couple of years, according to a new study. The findings, published in Radiology, suggest that MRIs could have value beyond detecting breast cancer.
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Special Commission on Cancer information session for ASCO attendees
ASCO Annual Meeting attendees that want to learn more about the Commission on Cancer — a quality program of the American College Surgeons — and the benefits of CoC accreditation are invited to attend a special Cancer Liaison Program Breakfast from 6:30-7:30 a.m. on Monday, June 1. The breakfast will be held in Regency CD of the Hyatt Regency McCormick Hotel at 2233 S Martin Luther King Drive, Chicago, 60616. For additional information, please contact clp@facs.org.
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ASCO: Vitamin B3 derivative cuts risk for new skin cancers
MedPage Today
A year of treatment with nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, significantly lowered the risk for skin cancer in high-risk patients, an Australian study showed. People who used nicotinamide had 23 percent fewer new nonmelanoma lesions as compared with people who did not use the agent. All 386 participants in the study had a history of skin cancer, increasing their risk for additional lesions.
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Tracking cancer by the numbers
Emory University via Medical Xpress
Is a woman's ability to have children compromised after cancer treatment, and should she be counseled to freeze her eggs? Is robotic prostate surgery less likely to result in impotence? Are women with breast cancer who are on Medicaid getting the recommended treatment? Help in answering these and other important questions can be found within an immense database: the Georgia Cancer Registry.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CANCER SCREENING.


Register for the NCDB Workshop and Survey Savvy
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Workshop and Survey Savvy will be held in Chicago June 17-19. The NCDB Workshop, Maximizing NCDB Data to Improve Your Cancer Program, will review the current uses and future updates for the NCDB quality tools. Major NCDB quality tools will be reviewed with a focus on how the data can be used to inform decisions for cancer program administration and by cancer physicians. Learn about the uses for the cancer registry and how patient navigators can use the data.

Survey Savvy provides in-depth review of the information your cancer committee needs to coordinate a high-quality, patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer program. Developed by Commission on Cancer (CoC) staff and CoC committee leadership, this program addresses your cancer program's most common questions, issues and concerns regarding CoC standards and compliance.

Whether your cancer program is preparing for a re-accreditation survey or looking for clarification on the standards, this program provides increased understanding of standard requirements and implementation. Through lectures, panel presentations and the opportunity to meet and speak with experts, cancer program members will learn how to use the CoC standards as a framework to develop a comprehensive cancer care program that delivers high-quality and patient-centered care. Plan now to attend these meetings.

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Nanotherapy effective in mice with multiple myeloma
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis via Medical Xpress
Researchers have designed a nanoparticle-based therapy that is effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma, a cancer of immune cells in the bone marrow. Targeted specifically to the malignant cells, these nanoparticles protect their therapeutic cargo from degradation in the bloodstream and greatly enhance drug delivery into the cancer cells. These are longtime hurdles in the development of this class of potential cancer drugs.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    CDC: Many adults failing to undergo recommended cancer screening (Medical News Today)
World-renowned surgeon evaluates parallels between prostate cancer, breast cancer (News-Medical.Net)
Researchers take step toward bringing precision medicine to all cancer patients (University of Michigan Health System via Medical Xpress)
A new way to use old tools against ovarian cancer (The Wall Street Journal)
80 percent of cervical cancers found to be preventable with latest 9-Valent HPV vaccine (Newswise)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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