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ACP offers advice for 'wiser' cancer screening
Medscape
It is time for cancer screening to become less intensive and more value focused, according to the American College of Physicians. Instead of trying to screen everyone more frequently or with more sensitive tests, the medical community should stick with less intense but proven strategies for screening, the group says.
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The CoC and the NAPBC are going social
Connect with the CoC and the NAPBC on Twitter. The CoC Twitter Account (COC-ACS) has been open for almost two months and has nearly 150 followers. The NAPBC Twitter Account (NAPBC_ACS) account opened almost a year ago and has more than 675 followers. Following the success of the NAPBC Twitter account, our newest social media endeavor is Facebook. Make sure you like the NAPBC Facebook page. If you have suggestions on ways to enhance your social media efforts, please contact Susan Rubin.
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Link found between breast-cancer genes, prostate cancer
The Wall Street Journal
Mutations in two genes well known for increasing the risk of breast and ovarian cancer may also play an important role in advanced prostate cancer, researchers said, an unexpected discovery that could lead to new treatments for some men with the disease. Analysis of DNA from tumor tissue obtained from 150 men with late-stage prostate cancer revealed mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes in about 15 percent of cases, according to a study published recently by the journal Cell. An additional 5 percent of the men had aberrations in genes with similar function.
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Family history has 'no adverse effect' on breast cancer outcomes
Medical News Today
Young women with breast cancer in their family background who need treatment for the disease themselves need not worry that it will be any less successful for them than for women without a family history, suggests a study comparing sporadic versus hereditary breast cancer.
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Deadline for the Special Study Extended to July 15
Thanks to everyone for all of your hard work to date on the special study. We have been listening to your feedback about the study deadline. At this time we have decided to give an extension of four weeks. The new study deadline will be Wednesday, July 15. We appreciate your participation in the webinars and submitted questions to date. For those of you who have already submitted your cases, we appreciate your dedication. Thanks to your timeliness, we have been able to start looking at the data to help us understand post-treatment surveillance imaging patterns and recurrence in cancer patients across the country. Your help with this special study has the potential to inform guidelines for the post-treatment follow-up care of men and women diagnosed with cancer. Thank you for your time and all that you are doing to make this special study a success. Contact PCORIspecialstudy@facs.org with any questions.
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Tomosynthesis detects more breast cancer in screening
Cancer Therapy Advisor
Tomosynthesis detects 40 percent more breast cancers than traditional mammography does, according to a major screening study published in European Radiology. This is the first large-scale study to compare the screening method with regular mammograms. The 3-D radiography technique is also more comfortable for women, as breast compression is halved.
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Very overweight teens may double their risk of bowel cancer in middle age
British Medical Journal via Medical Xpress
Being very overweight in your teens may double the risk of developing bowel cancer by the time you are middle aged, suggests research published online in the journal Gut. And a high level of an indicator of systemic inflammation — erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or ESR for short — at this age is also linked to heightened risk of the disease in later life, the study shows.
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Special Commission on Cancer information session for ASCO attendees
ASCO Annual Meeting attendees who want to learn more about the Commission on Cancer — a quality program of the American College Surgeons — and the benefits of CoC accreditation are invited to attend a special Cancer Liaison Program Breakfast from 6:30 to 7:30 a.m. on Monday, June 1. The breakfast will be held in the Regency CD of the Hyatt Regency McCormick Hotel at 2233 S Martin Luther King Drive, Chicago, 60616. For additional information, please contact clp@facs.org.
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Cancer scan could remove need for radiotherapy in cured patients
Oncology Nurse Advisor
The late effects of radiotherapy in patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma could be reduced by using a scan to determine those who actually need it, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The trial demonstrated that a positron-emission tomography scan immediately after treatment with chemotherapy can identify patients who have a very good outcome without additional radiotherapy.
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Oncologists wary of scaled-back guidelines in cancer screenings
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Free cancer screenings are gathering speed across the Allegheny Health Network, revealing dozens of abnormalities even as a national physicians' group encourages less aggressive tests for some patients. The North Side-based hospital system has screened more than 260 people since October, spotting abnormalities in about 20 percent of participants at sites including Jefferson Hospital in Jefferson Hills and the Wexford Health and Wellness Pavilion.
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Register for the NCDB Workshop and Survey Savvy
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Workshop and Survey Savvy will be held in Chicago June 17-19. The NCDB Workshop, Maximizing NCDB Data to Improve Your Cancer Program, will review the current uses and future updates for the NCDB quality tools. Major NCDB quality tools will be reviewed with a focus on how the data can be used to inform decisions for cancer program administration and by cancer physicians. Learn about the uses for the cancer registry and how patient navigators can use the data.

Survey Savvy provides in-depth review of the information your cancer committee needs to coordinate a high-quality, patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer program. Developed by Commission on Cancer (CoC) staff and CoC committee leadership, this program addresses your cancer program's most common questions, issues and concerns regarding CoC standards and compliance.

Whether your cancer program is preparing for a re-accreditation survey or looking for clarification on the standards, this program provides increased understanding of standard requirements and implementation. Through lectures, panel presentations and the opportunity to meet and speak with experts, cancer program members will learn how to use the CoC standards as a framework to develop a comprehensive cancer care program that delivers high-quality and patient-centered care. Plan now to attend these meetings.

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Ovarian cancer-specific markers set the stage for early diagnosis, personalized treatments
University of California - San Diego via Medical Xpress
Ovarian cancer is notoriously difficult to diagnose and treat, making it an especially fatal disease. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have now identified six mRNA isoforms (bits of genetic material) produced by ovarian cancer cells but not normal cells, opening up the possibility that they could be used to diagnose early-stage ovarian cancer. What's more, several of the mRNA isoforms code for unique proteins that could be targeted with new therapeutics.
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Bladder cancer: A focus on sexuality
Medscape
A bladder cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment can have a significant impact on a patient's physical, emotional and psychological well-being. Because healthcare providers tend to focus on these aspects of care, a patient's concerns with changes regarding sexual health are often overlooked.
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ASCO proposes new physician payment reforms
OncLive
ASCO has proposed a series of payment reforms that it says would significantly increase physician pay, improve the breadth of patient services available and lower the overall cost of cancer care. The reforms build on an oncology payment model ASCO proposed last year as a means of moving from fee-for-service care to value-based care.
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CoC and NAPBC provide tools to observe National Cancer
Survivors Day

June 7 marks the 28th Annual National Cancer Survivors Day, which brings cancer survivors together to show that there is life after receiving a diagnosis of cancer. The Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) encourage your program to observe this day and use this as an opportunity to display/promote your CoC and NAPBC accreditation status. To help you promote this event within your program and the community, the CoC and the NAPBC have developed a poster that you can download and print. Programs that hold CoC accreditation or have both CoC and NAPBC accreditations can access the poster by going to CoC Datalinks and clicking on Marketing Resources. For programs that are solely NAPBC accredited, please use the link to the Marketing Resources website provided in your performance report email notification. For more information, contact srubin@facs.org.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    NIH study: Microchip captures clusters of circulating tumor cells (National Institutes of Health)
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Tracking cancer by the numbers (Emory University via Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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