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Doctors seek test for deploying new life-extending cancer drugs
The New York Times
New drugs that boost the immune system's ability to fight tumors may be one of the greatest medical advances in years, cancer doctors say. These drugs can pull some patients from death's door and keep them in remission for years. But the truth is that this happens for only a minority of patients. Now, doctors say, there is a new imperative to develop a test that will identify in advance which patients will benefit, sparing others the cost and possible side effects.
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NCI-MATCH trial will link targeted cancer drugs to gene abnormalities
National Institutes of Health
Investigators for the nationwide trial, NCI-MATCH: Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice, announced recently at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago that the precision medicine trial will open to patient enrollment in July. The trial seeks to determine whether targeted therapies for people whose tumors have specific gene mutations will be effective regardless of their cancer type.
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CoC and NAPBC provide tools to observe National Cancer
Survivors Day

June 7 marks the 28th Annual National Cancer Survivors Day, which brings cancer survivors together to show that there is life after receiving a diagnosis of cancer. The Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) encourage your program to observe this day and use this as an opportunity to display/promote your CoC and NAPBC accreditation status. To help you promote this event within your program and the community, the CoC and the NAPBC have developed a poster that you can download and print. Programs that hold CoC accreditation or have both CoC and NAPBC accreditations can access the poster by going to CoC Datalinks and clicking on Marketing Resources. For programs that are solely NAPBC accredited, please use the link to the Marketing Resources website provided in your performance report email notification. For more information, contact srubin@facs.org.
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New 'Recovery Room' episode available
ACS
Approximately 17 percent of the pediatric and adolescent populations are considered obese. Obesity in children is related to other maladies, including diabetes, hypertension, liver disease and cardiac ailments. Weight loss surgical procedures have been shown to be effective and can reduce the associated illnesses brought on by obesity in adults. But should these same strategies also be used to treat obesity in children? In this episode of "The Recovery Room," host Frederick Greene, M.D., FACS, discusses children and bariatric surgery issues with guest Marc P. Michalsky, M.D., FACS, an expert in bariatric surgery in children and adolescents.
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'Smarter' cancer screening advised for women with dense breasts
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Not all women with dense breasts are at high enough risk for breast cancer to justify additional imaging after a normal mammogram, according to a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Women with specific types of dense breasts who also have a high five-year cancer risk should discuss supplemental screening strategies with their doctors.
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Register for the NCDB Workshop and Survey Savvy
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Workshop and Survey Savvy will be held in Chicago June 17-19. The NCDB Workshop, Maximizing NCDB Data to Improve Your Cancer Program, will review the current uses and future updates for the NCDB quality tools. Major NCDB quality tools will be reviewed with a focus on how the data can be used to inform decisions for cancer program administration and by cancer physicians. Learn about the uses for the cancer registry and how patient navigators can use the data.

Survey Savvy provides in-depth review of the information your cancer committee needs to coordinate a high-quality, patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer program. Developed by Commission on Cancer (CoC) staff and CoC committee leadership, this program addresses your cancer program's most common questions, issues and concerns regarding CoC standards and compliance.

Whether your cancer program is preparing for a re-accreditation survey or looking for clarification on the standards, this program provides increased understanding of standard requirements and implementation. Through lectures, panel presentations and the opportunity to meet and speak with experts, cancer program members will learn how to use the CoC standards as a framework to develop a comprehensive cancer care program that delivers high-quality and patient-centered care. Plan now to attend these meetings.

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CDC: Cancer screening rates remain below Healthy People 2020 targets
Healio
The number of adults in the United States who underwent the recommended screening tests for breast, colorectal and cervical cancers in 2013 fell below the targets set by the Healthy People 2020 initiative, according to data published in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. However, certain population subgroups — including highly educated women and older adults — approached or exceeded screening targets, according to the report.
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Radioactive particles combined with chemotherapy slow advanced bowel cancer growth in the liver
Cancer Research UK via Medical Xpress
A new cancer treatment that injects tiny radioactive "microspheres" into the liver can slow the growth of tumors that have spread there, according to new research. The microspheres are about a third of the width of a human hair and contain the radioactive element yttrium-90. They are delivered directly to the liver via the blood stream. The particles then become lodged in the small blood vessels surrounding the tumour and bombard it with radiation, while having minimal impact on the surrounding healthy tissue.
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New website helps educate patients on the value of clinical trials
About Clinical Trials
About Clinical Trials is a unique, online resource that features unscripted interviews with clinical trial participants, physicians, patient rights advocates and others. The stories and information presented should be shared with your patients in order to have educated discussions on the importance of clinical trials. The videos include: Why Should I Consider a Cancer Clinical Trial?, How Will I Know if a Clinical Trial Is Right for Me?, How Should I Prepare for Discussions with My Doctor?, What Standards Are in Place to Safeguard Trial Participants?, What Is Informed Consent? and Where Can I Turn for Information and Support?
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CANCER RESEARCH.


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Noninvasive colon cancer screening promising for African Americans
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A new noninvasive technology for colon cancer screening is a promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans. This study was presented at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Although all men and women are at risk for colon cancer, African Americans are at a higher risk for the disease than other populations. Routine screening tests are recommended for everyone starting at age 50 years; but colon cancer is diagnosed in African Americans at a younger average age than other people, therefore, some experts suggest that African Americans should begin screening at age 45 years.
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On the death of Beau Biden, brain cancer, progress and hope
Forbes
In the midst of this year's meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, news broke that U.S. Vice President Joe Biden's son died of brain cancer. Beau Biden was 46 years old, what — by standards of American longevity — might have been the middle of his life. Brain cancer remains a relatively rare tumor in adults, and a stubborn one at that. According to the National Cancer Institute, tumors arising in the brain and central nervous system number around 23,400 cases each year in the U.S.
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Tests for new cancer drugs not reliable enough, doctors say
Reuters
Drugmakers including Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and Merck & Co are testing which patients will most benefit from new cancer treatments based on a protein found in their tumors, but that guide, known as a biomarker, may be too unreliable, researchers and health experts said. Bristol's Opdivo and Merck's Keytruda are both therapies designed to block a protein known as Programmed Death receptor that tumors use to evade the body's natural defenses. Competitors Roche Holding, AstraZeneca and Pfizer also have similar drugs in an earlier stage of development. The drugmakers are conducting clinical trials that test patient tumors for a related protein called PD-L1.
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Rare case of Hodgkin's lymphoma located outside of lymph nodes diagnosed
Asociacion RUVID via Medical Xpress
Dr. Jerónimo Forteza, professor of pathology and director of the Valencian Institute of Pathology, Catholic University of Valencia San Vicente Mártir, recently published an article in the Spanish Journal of Pathology on the case of a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Most cases of Hodgkin's lymphoma arise in the lymph nodes and rarely in locations outside of the nodules. What distinguishes this case is that it is a classical Hodgkin's lymphoma with extranodal location in the thyroid. There have been only 26 cases similar to this in the scientific literature.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    ACP offers advice for 'wiser' cancer screening (Medscape)
Tomosynthesis detects more breast cancer in screening (Cancer Therapy Advisor)
Oncologists wary of scaled-back guidelines in cancer screenings (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review)
Link found between breast-cancer genes, prostate cancer (The Wall Street Journal)
Very overweight teens may double their risk of bowel cancer in middle age (British Medical Journal via Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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