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New clues for detecting colorectal cancers earlier
The Wall Street Journal
A study of how often people visit their doctor may offer a way to help detect colorectal cancers earlier. The study, in the International Journal of Cancer, found patients with colorectal cancers saw their family doctor significantly more often in the year before their diagnosis than did people without cancer. Before they were diagnosed, the cancer patients also had more blood tests for anemia and prescriptions for hemorrhoids, which are associated with colorectal cancer, the researchers said.
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Fusion of normal cells may trigger genetic changes leading to cancer
Medical News Today
As the number two leading cause of death in the United States, cancer touches just about everyone in some way. There are many factors involved in the formation of cancer, and genetic changes are a key culprit. Now, a new study sheds light on how the fusion of one normal cell with another can trigger genomic events that turn normal cells cancerous, allowing tumors to form.
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Women four times less likely to have surgery if breast cancer diagnosed as an emergency
Medical Xpress
Breast cancer patients are four times less likely to have potentially lifesaving surgery if diagnosed as an emergency rather than through an urgent GP referral, according to a new data published recently. This is the first study of its kind that looks at how treatment varies across cancers depending on the patients' route to diagnosis. It presents the proportion of patients having major surgery for 20 cancer sites and compares urgent GP referral (two-week referral) to the other routes to diagnosis. The report shows that the difference in the proportions of patients either having major surgery or missing out is greatest for breast cancer.
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Pre-natal blood test study leads to 'unexpected' cancer diagnosis in 3 women
Cancer Research UK
Researchers in Belgium trying to improve a blood test used to spot fetal disorders have found unexpected signs of cancer in three of the 4,000 pregnant women on their study. U.K. experts said the findings were "important," but stressed that there was a long way to go before the work could be harnessed to routinely improve cancer diagnosis or treatment. Non-invasive pre-natal testing, or NIPT, is used to test for conditions such as Down's syndrome before birth. It works by looking for certain changes in a fetus's DNA that can be isolated from the mother's blood.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CANCER RESEARCH.


'Tobacco Control and Cancer Survivorship: From Science to Strategies'
Research to Reality
2-3 p.m. EDT, June 16
The negative impact of tobacco use on the short- and long-term prognosis of cancer patients and survivors is increasingly well understood. Over the next three months, the Comprehensive Cancer Control National Partnership will lead a concerted effort to highlight key research and intervention findings to address this issue. The NCI Research to Reality cyber-seminar kicks off this three-part series by highlighting two innovative and successful interventions designed to deliver evidence-based tobacco control interventions to patients and survivors. Learn more and register.

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  The Integration of the NCBC and ASBD

Announcing the integration of two organizations: the National Consortium of Breast Centers (NCBC) and the American Society of Breast Disease (ASBD). With over 65 years of combined experience, together they will yield one stronger and more vibrant organization that will continue to positively impact the quality of breast care.
 


New cancer surgery manual available from the American College of Surgeons and Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology
The American College of Surgeons and the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology present the first comprehensive, evidence-based examination of cancer surgery techniques that are critical to achieve optimal outcomes in a cancer operation. Operative Standards for Cancer Surgery is a unique manual that focuses on best practices for breast, colon, lung and pancreatic surgery, describing the surgical procedures that occur between skin incision and skin closure that directly affect cancer outcomes.
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US cancer study to match existing drugs to genetic mutations
The Wall Street Journal
The National Cancer Institute is launching a major trial in which it will play matchmaker between 1,000 advanced cancer patients and the growing cadre of drugs that can target tumors by their genetic mutations, not just where they occur in the body. The study, called NCI-Match, seeks to advance the emerging field of precision medicine by helping to spur development of drugs that precisely target mutations linked to tumor growth. At least 10 pharmaceutical companies will provide a total of more than 20 treatments to be tested — all under the structure of a single study.
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Yin and yang: Immune signaling protein has opposing roles in breast cancer development
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center via Medical Xpress
Countering previously held beliefs, researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that inhibiting the immune receptor protein TLR4 may not be a wise treatment strategy in all cancers. This is because TLR4 can either promote or inhibit breast cancer cell growth depending on mutations in a gene called TP53.
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Prognosis for patients with breast cancer is not impeded by family history
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A new large study finds that prognosis after treatment for women with breast cancer who have a family history of the disease is no worse than it is for other women with breast cancer. The study, which was published recently in the British Journal of Surgery, offers a positive message for women who may worry about their future in light of a family history of breast cancer.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Improve Cancer Education — Join AACE!
Join a passionate network of people dedicated to improving cancer education! The American Association for Cancer Education champions the highest standards for cancer education through evidence-based practices to achieve quality outcomes. Membership is open to anyone engaged in cancer education and training.

See the Membership Benefits of AACE – Join Today!
 


Registrars earn two free CE hours by attending AJCC Curriculum Webinar
The AJCC Curriculum for Registrars Module III lessons are now available. The Lesson 21 webinar, which provides two CE hours for free, will be held on June 23. Register now and prepare by reviewing the self-study lessons. Please view the Module I and Module II recorded webinars if you missed them since each Module builds upon the previous ones, and no information will be repeated. Go to the AJCC website for more information.
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Experts discuss Medicare's new oncology care model
The American Journal of Managed Care
The CMS Innovation center recently announced the development of a new payment and delivery model to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of specialty healthcare. The new Oncology Care Model, one of several models being developed by CMMI, requires participating physician practices that administer chemotherapy to enter into payment agreements with CMS to measure financial and performance accountability for episodes of care. Incentives in OCM include a monthly per beneficiary-per month payment of $160 for the entire duration of the episode, along with the possibility of a performance-based payment to foster quality care at a lower cost during the episode.
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Register for the NCDB Workshop and Survey Savvy
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Workshop and Survey Savvy will be held in Chicago June 17-19. The NCDB Workshop, Maximizing NCDB Data to Improve Your Cancer Program, will review the current uses and future updates for the NCDB quality tools. Major NCDB quality tools will be reviewed with a focus on how the data can be used to inform decisions for cancer program administration and by cancer physicians. Learn about the uses for the cancer registry and how patient navigators can use the data.

Survey Savvy provides in-depth review of the information your cancer committee needs to coordinate a high-quality, patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer program. Developed by Commission on Cancer (CoC) staff and CoC committee leadership, this program addresses your cancer program's most common questions, issues and concerns regarding CoC standards and compliance.

Whether your cancer program is preparing for a re-accreditation survey or looking for clarification on the standards, this program provides increased understanding of standard requirements and implementation. Through lectures, panel presentations and the opportunity to meet and speak with experts, cancer program members will learn how to use the CoC standards as a framework to develop a comprehensive cancer care program that delivers high-quality and patient-centered care. Plan now to attend these meetings.

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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Doctors seek test for deploying new life-extending cancer drugs (The New York Times)
'Smarter' cancer screening advised for women with dense breasts (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
On the death of Beau Biden, brain cancer, progress and hope (Forbes)
NCI-MATCH trial will link targeted cancer drugs to gene abnormalities (National Institutes of Health)
Noninvasive colon cancer screening promising for African Americans (Oncology Nurse Advisor)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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