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Study: Breast cancer drug Herceptin linked to risk of heart problems
HealthDay via U.S. News & World Report
As many as one in 10 women taking the breast cancer drug trastuzumab (Herceptin) will experience some type of heart problem, according to new research. The good news from this study is that these problems typically reverse once treatment is finished. "The overall message here is one of tremendous reassurance," said study researcher Dr. Brian Leyland-Jones, vice-president of molecular and experimental medicine at Avera Cancer Institute in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
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Register now — Strengthening Your Cancer Program...Utilizing the Rapid Quality Reporting System to Comply with the New Commendation Standard
Commission on Cancer
Strengthening Your Cancer Program...Utilizing the Rapid Quality Reporting System to Comply with the New Commendation Standard will be held on June 18 in Chicago, Illinois, the day before the 2014 CoC Workshop. This workshop will provide important information to help your program comply with the new commendation standard that requires programs, from initial enrollment and throughout the three-year accreditation period, to participate in the Rapid Quality Reporting System (RQRS). Register now for the program; registration fees are $300.
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Lifetime cancer risks from X-rays for children 'relatively low'
Medical News Today
Parents have plenty to worry about when it comes to the health and safety of their kids. But a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation suggests radiation from standard X-rays is low and does not raise lifetime cancer risks for most children. To adequately study the effects of radiation in children, researchers followed 337 children under the age of six who had surgery for heart disease at Duke University Medical Center in North Carolina.
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Resistance to ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia explained
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A new study has discovered how resistance develops in patients taking ibrutinib (Imbruvica), a new and highly effective drug for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Gene mutations are found to be the cause of ibrutinib resistance in CLL patients. "Knowledge of these mutations is the first step in the development of drugs or drug combinations that might prevent or treat ibrutinib-resistant CLL," said co-principal investigator John C. Byrd, MD, of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center­ - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute in Columbus.
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    Register now for the 2014 CoC Workshop — Strengthening Your Cancer Program...Enriching the Coordinators' Role
    Commission on Cancer
    On June 19-20 in Chicago, Illinois, the Commission on Cancer (CoC) will hold a new workshop entitled Strengthening Your Cancer Program…Enriching the Coordinators' Role. This program provides information and case studies on the roles and responsibilities of the various CoC-designated coordinators. The two-day program will cover what the various coordinators' roles are, what their roles on the cancer committee involve, and how to meet and improve the required responsibilities based on the CoC Standards. Register for the program. Program fees are $750.
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    Semen test may improve prostate cancer detection
    Fox News
    A new study has discovered biomarkers in seminal fluid that may improve the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis, according to Medical News Today. Currently, prostate cancer — one of the most common cancers in men and a major cause of cancer-related deaths — is detected by using a prostate-specific antigen test. While the test is very sensitive, it is not highly specific for prostate cancer, which can lead to over-diagnosis and unnecessary procedures.
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    Survey sheds light on common clinical practice for incompletely resected lung cancer
    Medical Xpress
    A landmark survey of more than 700 specialists provides crucial real-world insight into the treatments most oncologists choose for lung cancer patients whose tumor has been incompletely resected, an expert from the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) says. Jean Yves Douillard, from the ICO Institut de Cancerologie de l'Ouest René Gauducheau, France, chair of the ESMO Educational Committee, was commenting on a paper published in the journal Lung Cancer.
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    Coming soon — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation Workshop
    Commission on Cancer
    The first program, held early this year, was a sell-out. To meet the numerous requests, the Commission on Cancer (CoC) will repeat Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation on September 12, 2014, in San Antonio, Texas. Plan now to attend the only program developed by the professionals who are involved in CoC standards development and the survey process. Watch your e-mail for detailed information or contact srubin@facs.org.
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    Interruption of biological rhythms during chemotherapy worsens side effects
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    Chemotherapy disrupts circadian rhythms leading to a higher risk for clinically relevant fatigue or weight loss. This study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, showed the importance of preventing chronodisruption and implementing measures to strengthen the circadian rhythms in patients undergoing chemotherapy.
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    Fasting may improve immune system health during aging process — chemotherapy patients may also benefit
    Medical Daily
    Periodic fasting may protect immune system health among healthy middle-aged people and the elderly, along with chemotherapy patients and other people who suffer immune-related conditions, a new study finds. As our bodies age or are exposed to various forms of stress, such as disease and autoimmune disorders, the white blood cells that once conquered harmful invaders now, unfortunately, relent.
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    FORDS revision project
    Commission on Cancer, National Cancer Data Base
    FORDS is a manual that contains all of the data items with rules and coding options for cancer registrars to collect data in their hospital registry. These data are then submitted to the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). The data available in the NCDB come from FORDS, Collaborative Stage, and the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. The Commission on Cancer (CoC) is seeking input from registrars, data users, physicians, and others to modernize the current FORDS manual. This project kicked off in April 2014. The input will be gathered through an electronic survey, which will be open through September 2014.
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    4 new genes added to the 'inherited breast cancer' risk list
    Medical News Today
    Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have discovered four new genes that increase breast cancer risk when mutated. The team, who lead an international consortium with the aim of locating more gene mutations that may cause inherited breast cancer susceptibilities, have added RINT1, MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN to the growing list of higher risk genes.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Study: In treating some cancer patients, less is more (Reuters)
    Combination treatment shows early promise for metastatic pancreatic ductal cancer (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
    25 percent of smokers carry newly discovered genetic link to lung cancer (Medical Daily)
    New way to predict response to chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
    Immune therapies improve treatment of cancers (USA Today)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     
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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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