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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit June 17, 2015


 

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'Exceptional responders' to cancer drugs draw scrutiny from scientists
The Washington Post
Grace Silva and Karen Coakley are both 59, mothers living in the Boston suburbs and patients at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where they have spent years wrestling with daunting diagnoses. While they have never met, the two women are connected in a way that goes beyond their similar stories and their struggles with cancer. They share an intimate and uncommon link, the sort of genetic bond possible only in an age of precision medicine.
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Study shows benefit of higher-quality screening colonoscopies
The JAMA Network Journals via Medical Xpress
An analysis that included information from more than 57,000 screening colonoscopies suggests that higher adenoma detection rates may be associated with up to 50 percent to 60 percent lower lifetime colorectal cancer incidence and death without higher overall costs, despite a higher number of colonoscopies and potential complications, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA.
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Smoking causes 12 different kinds of cancers
TIME
Everyone knows smoking can cause lung cancer. But it also causes a whole array of other varieties of the disease, from pancreatic cancer to leukemia. Now, new research sheds light on just how deadly tobacco can be when smokers get cancer. Smoking causes more than 48 percent of deaths from the 12 types of cancer sometimes caused by smoking, according to new research in JAMA Internal Medicine.
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The CoC and the NAPBC are going social
Connect with the CoC and the NAPBC on Twitter. The CoC Twitter Account (COC_ACS) has been open for almost two months and has nearly 150 followers. The NAPBC Twitter Account (NAPBC_ACS) account opened almost a year ago and has more than 675 followers. Following the success of the NAPBC Twitter account, our newest social media endeavor is Facebook. Make sure you like the NAPBC Facebook page. If you have suggestions on ways to enhance our social media efforts, please contact Susan Rubin.
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Radiation experts unite to streamline cancer clinical trials
Cancer Research UK
Regulations on radiation exposure have been a critical bottleneck in starting up new cancer trials, but now radiation experts from the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre network — a joint initiative between Cancer Research UK and the U.K.'s four health departments — are pioneering a new streamlined system to reduce the time taken to set up clinical trials involving radiotherapy and other forms of ionizing radiation, such as PET scans.
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Not working out: Getting cancer patients to just do it
Medscape
VideoBriefDr. Harold Burstein writes: "Mounting evidence suggests that lifestyle modifications can improve survival for cancer patients and be a very important part of their ongoing care. I wanted to talk today about what those lifestyle modifications are and, in particular, the role of the oncologist in helping patients make those changes."
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CANCER RESEARCH.


New method for investigating and classifying liver tumors
Medical University of Vienna via Medical Xpress
Adenomas are rare liver tumors, a certain percentage of which can become malignant. Using a new MR (magnetic resonance) technique at MedUni Vienna, it is now possible to classify adenomas without subjecting patients to invasive tissue sampling procedures. Previously, patients have had to undergo biopsy to take tissue samples for histological examination in order to determine whether a hepatocellular adenoma is benign or potentially malignant.
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New 'Recovery Room' episode available
ACS
Approximately 17 percent of the pediatric and adolescent populations are considered obese. Obesity in children is related to other maladies, including diabetes, hypertension, liver disease and cardiac ailments. Weight loss surgical procedures have been shown to be effective and can reduce the associated illnesses brought on by obesity in adults. But should these same strategies also be used to treat obesity in children? In this episode of "The Recovery Room," host Frederick Greene, M.D., FACS, discusses children and bariatric surgery issues with guest Marc P. Michalsky, M.D., FACS, an expert in bariatric surgery in children and adolescents.
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Cervical cancer screening: Review calls for urgent screening changes
Medical News Today
Following a review of cervical cancer cases, calls have been made for urgent changes to cervical cancer screening recommendations, aiming to encourage routine screening for older women. The review, published in The BMJ, found that in the U.K., around 20 percent of new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed are in women aged 65 and over, along with around 50 percent of deaths. In comparison, the review found that just 2 percent of new cervical cancer diagnoses were made in women under the age of 25.
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ALK1 protein may play a role in breast cancer metastasis
Science Codex
Prognosis for breast cancer is relatively good when detected in its early stages. Metastatic disease is the cause of 90 percent of all cancer-related deaths. Therefore, learning more about the metastatic process and finding new cures to inhibit disease spread is at the center of clinical attention.
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'Groundbreaking' cure for deadly asbestos-related cancer could be near
RT
A Kiwi professor has developed a new treatment that has already saved one man's life and could possibly help thousands more defeat mesothelioma — an aggressive cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. The disease results in death shortly after diagnosis. Asbestos was once hailed as a miracle mineral, resistant to heat. Prolonged inhalation of asbestos fibers, however, is notorious for causing lung cancer and mesothelioma.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New clues for detecting colorectal cancers earlier (The Wall Street Journal)
Women four times less likely to have surgery if breast cancer diagnosed as an emergency (Medical Xpress)
Experts discuss Medicare's new oncology care model (The American Journal of Managed Care)
Fusion of normal cells may trigger genetic changes leading to cancer (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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