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Lipids help to fight leukemia
Medical Xpress
T cells use a novel mechanism to fight leukemia. They may recognize unique lipids produced by cancer cells and kill tumor cells expressing these lipid molecules. A study conducted by researchers at the University of Basel shows that a tumor-associated lipid stimulates specific T cells, which efficiently kill leukemia cells both in vitro and in animal models. The results have been published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.
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U.S. cancer survivors face significant economic burden
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
U.S. cancer survivors face significant economic burdens due to growing medical costs, missed work, and reduced productivity, according to a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. “Cancer survivors face physical, emotional, psychosocial, employment, and financial challenges as a result of their cancer diagnosis and treatment,” said Donatus U. Ekwueme, PhD, a senior health economist at CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. “With the number of cancer survivors expected to increase by more than 30 percent in the next decade — to 18 million Americans — medical and public health professionals must be diligent in their efforts to help reduce the burden of cancer on survivors and their families.”
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Skin moles tied to breast cancer risk: Studies
Reuters Health
The number of moles a woman has may be tied to her risk of developing breast cancer, according to two new studies. The studies don’t prove that moles cause breast cancer or that women with a lot of moles will definitely get breast cancer. Instead, they suggest there may be a small genetic or hormonal link between the two.
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Promising results from new therapy for pancreatic cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A clinical trial showed that the new drug MM-398, given in combination with 5-flourouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin, produced a significant overall survival rate in patients with advanced, previously treated pancreatic cancer. The NAPOLI-1 (NAnoliPOsomaL Irinotecan) Phase 3 study, which is a final confirmation of a drug's safety and effectiveness, was conducted among patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who previously received gemcitibine, which has been the standard-of-care therapy for such patients.
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    Coming soon — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation Workshop
    Commission on Cancer
    The first program, held early this year, was a sell-out. To meet the numerous requests, the Commission on Cancer (CoC) will repeat Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation on September 12, 2014, in San Antonio, Texas. Plan now to attend the only program developed by the professionals who are involved in CoC standards development and the survey process. Watch your e-mail for detailed information or contact srubin@facs.org.
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    Nanoshell shields foreign enzymes used to starve cancer cells from immune system
    Phys.org
    Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a nanoshell to protect foreign enzymes used to starve cancer cells as part of chemotherapy. Their work is featured on the June 2014 cover of the journal Nano Letters. Enzymes are naturally smart machines that are responsible for many complex functions and chemical reactions in biology. However, despite their huge potential, their use in medicine has been limited by the immune system, which is designed to attack foreign intruders.
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    FORDS revision project
    Commission on Cancer, National Cancer Data Base
    FORDS is a manual that contains all of the data items with rules and coding options for cancer registrars to collect data in their hospital registry. These data are then submitted to the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). The data available in the NCDB come from FORDS, Collaborative Stage, and the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. The Commission on Cancer (CoC) is seeking input from registrars, data users, physicians, and others to modernize the current FORDS manual. This project kicked off in April 2014. The input will be gathered through an electronic survey, which will be open through September 2014.
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    Genomics of lung cancer progression vary widely
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    Tumor sequencing of several different lung cancers and their surrounding tissue complicates the prevailing theory of linear lung cancer progression and offers new insights for management of this deadly cancer, according to a new study. Sequencing results provide, for the first time, strong molecular evidence of progression from phenotypically indolent components to more aggressive disease and also show that both components can progress independently, even if they arise from the same precursor, according to the study, which appeared in Cancer Research.
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    Too much sitting may raise risk for certain cancers, study finds
    CBS News
    You may want to stand up to read this. A new study suggests that people who spend the bulk of their day sitting — whether behind the wheel, in front of the TV, or working at a computer — appear to have an increased risk for certain kinds of cancers. Previous studies have tied too much time spent sedentary to a variety of health problems, including heart disease, blood clots, a large waistline, higher blood sugar and insulin, generally poor physical functioning, and even early death.
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    Adjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation recommended for R1 resected cancer patients
    News-Medical.net
    A landmark survey of more than 700 specialists provides crucial real-world insight into the treatments most oncologists choose for lung cancer patients whose tumor has been incompletely resected, an expert from the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) says. Jean Yves Douillard, from the ICO Institut de Cancerologie de l'Ouest Ren- Gauducheau, France, chair of the ESMO Educational Committee, was commenting on a paper published in the journal Lung Cancer. In the study, researchers led by Raffaele Califano of The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, U.K., surveyed 768 oncologists from 41 European countries about the treatments they offered patients who had "R1 resected" non-small-cell lung cancer.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
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        Study: Breast cancer drug Herceptin linked to risk of heart problems (HealthDay via U.S. News & World Report)
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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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