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'Smarter' ordering of breast biomarker tests could save millions in healthcare dollars
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine via Medical Xpress
A review of medical records for almost 200 patients with breast cancer suggests that more selective use of biomarker testing for such patients has the potential to save millions of dollars in healthcare spending without compromising care, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. Specifically, waiting to perform these tests until a patient has a full excisional biopsy instead of "reflexively" or automatically testing for them on initial small "core" biopsies could save as much as $117 million, according to a report on the study published in the July issue of The American Journal of Surgical Pathology.
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Findings could help improve patient care, reduce cancer screening costs around the world
News-Medical.Net
A large clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa has found that contrary to expectations, a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis does not improve cancer detection in people with unexplained blood clots in their legs and lungs. The results, published in the June 22 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, are expected to improve patient care and reduce screening costs around the world.
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ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Baltimore on Sept. 11. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards are a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer. Register today.
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Colorectal cancer cells reverted to normal functioning cells in lab
Medical News Today
The tumor suppressor gene known as adenomatous polyposis coli is thought to have been affected by inactivating mutations in "the vast majority" of colorectal tumors, the researchers publishing in the journal Cell say. They found that restoring normal levels of the human colorectal cancer gene in mice stopped tumor growth and re-established normal intestinal function within just four days.
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Researchers develop new breath test to diagnose oesophageal and gastric cancer
Imperial College London via Medical Xpress
Researchers have devised a breath test that can help doctors diagnose the early signs of oesophageal and gastric cancer in minutes. The test has produced encouraging results in a clinical study and will now be tested in a larger trial involving three hospitals in London. Researchers analysed breath samples of 210 patients using the test. They found that the test can discriminate between malignant and benign oesophageal cancer in patients for the first time.
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CDC pushes prevention as melanoma rates double
USA Today
Rates of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, have doubled in the United States in the past 30 years and will continue to climb unless people minimize exposure to ultraviolet light, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report comes as rising temperatures send sunseekers outside in pursuit of bronzed skin.
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The CoC and the NAPBC are going social
Connect with the CoC and the NAPBC on Twitter. The CoC Twitter account (COC_ACS) has been open for almost three months and has nearly 250 followers. The NAPBC Twitter account (NAPBC_ACS) opened almost a year ago and has more than 700 followers. Following the success of the NAPBC Twitter account, our newest social media endeavor is Facebook. Make sure you like the NAPBC Facebook page. If you have suggestions on ways to enhance our social media efforts, please contact Susan Rubin.
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Breast cancer false alarms have a negative impact on women's health
Oncology Nurse Advisor
"It was a false alarm. You don't have breast cancer." This ought to be a happy message for women who have been through a mammography screening that initially showed signs of something being wrong. However, even though the women are declared healthy after follow-up examinations, they are so affected by the first message that they still show signs of stress and depression several years after the false alarm.
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Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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