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Cell division discovery could optimize timing of chemotherapy and explain some cancers
Phys.org
Research led by the University of Warwick's Systems Biology Centre and Medical School in collaboration with groups in Nice and Rotterdam has been able to demonstrate how the cycle of cell division in mammalian cells synchronises with the body's own daily rhythm, its circadian clock. The study not only helps to explain why people with sustained disrupted circadian rhythms can be more susceptible to cancer, it may also help establish the optimal time of day to administer chemotherapy.
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Study links vitamin D deficiency to 'all-cause mortality and cancer prognosis'
Medical News Today
Medical News Today recently reported on a study from the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine, which suggests a link between vitamin D deficiency and premature death. Now, new research published in the BMJ links vitamin D deficiency to increased risk of death from all causes — including cardiovascular disease and cancer — and it may even play a part in cancer prognosis.
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Low cholesterol linked to worse survival in kidney cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
People are often told to reduce their cholesterol to improve their heart health, but new research suggests that low cholesterol may increase kidney cancer patients' risk of dying from their disease. The findings in this study, published in BJU International, indicate that cholesterol testing may help doctors as they monitor and treat patients with kidney cancer. Increasing evidence suggests that alterations in cholesterol and other lipids are associated with the development, progression, and prognosis of various cancers.
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2014 cancer survivorship statistics — 10 key facts
American Cancer Society
Every two years, American Cancer Society researchers analyze and report on cancer survivorship and treatment statistics in the United States. They summarize the data in the publications Cancer Treatment & Survivorship Facts & Figures, published on cancer.org, and in Cancer Treatment & Survivorship Statistics, published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. The recently released 2014 publications provide in-depth information about current and projected cancer prevalence estimates for the United States, as well as data from the National Cancer Data Base on treatment patterns, and information on the common effects of cancer and its treatment.
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Red meat may raise breast cancer risk
Cancer Network
Women who consume increased amounts of red meat have a higher risk of breast cancer compared with those who have a protein intake consisting largely of other forms of protein such as poultry, fish, and legumes, according to a new study that looked at the protein diets of premenopausal women. While the majority of previous studies have looked at women’s diets late in life, the current study, by Maryam S. Farvid, PhD, associate professor in the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts, and colleagues, examined the diet histories of women aged 24 to 43, who took part in the Nurses’ Health Study II.
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    FORDS revision project
    Commission on Cancer, National Cancer Data Base
    FORDS is a manual that contains all of the data items with rules and coding options for cancer registrars to collect data in their hospital registry. These data are then submitted to the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). The data available in the NCDB come from FORDS, Collaborative Stage, and the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. The Commission on Cancer (CoC) is seeking input from registrars, data users, physicians, and others to modernize the current FORDS manual. This project kicked off in April 2014. The input will be gathered through an electronic survey, which will be open through September 2014.
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    Antiviral therapy can reduce risk of liver cancer in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection
    News-medical.net
    One of the most severe complications of hepatitis B is the development of liver cancer, which is responsible for approximately 745,000 deaths worldwide each year. Two new studies appearing in the June issue of Gastroenterology provide strong evidence that antiviral therapy can reduce the risk of liver cancer in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection.
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    Coming soon — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation Workshop
    Commission on Cancer
    The first program, held early this year, was a sell-out. To meet the numerous requests, the Commission on Cancer (CoC) will repeat Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation on September 12, 2014, in San Antonio, Texas. Plan now to attend the only program developed by the professionals who are involved in CoC standards development and the survey process. Watch your e-mail for detailed information or contact srubin@facs.org.
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    Prophylaxis may cut VTE risk in cancer surgery patients
    Medpage Today
    Presurgical prophylaxis for venothromboembolism appeared to reduce the risk of thrombosis in cancer patients without increasing the risk of bleeding episodes, researchers reported. Overall, venothromboembolism events — including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism — occurred at a rate of 0.8 percent in those patients who received enoxaparin (Lovenox) before surgery compared with a rate of 2.3 percent in patients who did not receive prophylaxis.
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    Process personalizes treatment for lung cancer patients
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    Researchers have developed a process to analyze mutated genes in lung adenocarcinoma to help better select personalized treatment options for patients. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type of lung cancer in the United States, with approximately 130,000 people diagnosed each year. The research team was a collaborative effort between Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, and the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.
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    Starving pancreatic cancer before it has a chance to feast
    Medical Xpress
    Pancreatic cancer's low survival rate gives researchers from the University of Kansas Cancer Center even more reason to find a way to prevent and treat the hard-to-detect cancer. Snigdha Banerjee, PhD, and Sushanta Banerjee, PhD.=, a husband and wife research team at the Kansas City VA Medical Center, are working toward cutting off the growth of pancreatic tumors before they can metastasize throughout the body. Their main target is angiogenesis — or creating new blood vessels from existing ones.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Too much sitting may raise risk for certain cancers, study finds (CBS News)
    Skin moles tied to breast cancer risk: Studies (Reuters Health)
    U.S. cancer survivors face significant economic burden (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
    Lipids help to fight leukemia (Medical Xpress)
    Promising results from new therapy for pancreatic cancer (Oncology Nurse Advisor)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     
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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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