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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit July 01, 2015


 

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Hematology, oncology communities react to ACA decision
Healio
The American Society for Radiation Oncology issued a favorable response to the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding healthcare subsidies under the Affordable Care Act in states without exchanges. The 6-3 ruling for King v. Burwell on June 25 stipulated that the Internal Revenue Service may extend tax credits and premium subsidies for consumers who purchase health insurance through state or federal exchanges under the ACA. The ACA was passed by Congress and signed into law in 2010. The court began hearing oral arguments for King v. Burwell in early March.
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Multimodality treatment for metastatic lung cancer with surgery may improve survival
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Patients with an advanced form of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer may benefit from surgical resection of all or part of the lung in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy, according to a study published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. The study found that patients with stage IIIB NSCLC may benefit from multimodality treatment that combines surgical resection in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Surgery should be added to the treatment regimen only for carefully selected patients.
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Atomic force microscope advance leads to new breast cancer research
Phys.Org
Researchers who developed a high-speed form of atomic force microscopy have shown how to image the physical properties of live breast cancer cells, for the first time revealing details about how deactivation of a key protein may lead to metastasis. The new findings also are providing evidence for the mechanisms involved in a cell's response to anti-cancer drugs, said Arvind Raman, Purdue University's Robert V. Adams professor of mechanical engineering.
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Scientists identify key to preventing metastatic breast cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Scientists have identified a possible key to preventing secondary cancers in patients with breast cancer, after discovering an enzyme that enhances the spread of the disease. The enzyme lysyl oxidase released from the primary tumor causes holes in bone and prepares the bone for the future arrival of cancer cells. Further, the study found that treatment with a bisphosphonate prevented the changes in the bone and the spread of the disease in mice. Bisphosphonates are an existing class of drugs that prevents the loss of bone mass and is already used to treat diseases such as osteoporosis.
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Colon cancer: Taking a step back to move forward
Weizmann Institute of Science via Medical Xpress
Recent Weizmann Institute studies are revealing a complex picture of cancer progression in which certain genes that drive tumor growth in the earlier stages get suppressed in later stages — taking a step back to move forward. Current research in the lab of professor Avri Ben-Ze'ev of the Molecular Cell Biology Department suggests that the tumor cells at the invasive front of later-stage human colorectal cancer may take an even bigger step back: Some of their gene expression patterns are shared with those of healthy intestinal stem cells.
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Register now for Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Baltimore on Sept. 11. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards are a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer. Register today.
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Why it is important to predict which lymphoma patients may relapse early
Medical News Today
After analyzing data on hundreds of cases, researchers suggest that two years — rather than the more common five years for many cancer patients — might be a more practical survival goal for patients with a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma called follicular lymphoma.
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The CoC and the NAPBC are going social
Connect with the CoC and the NAPBC on Twitter. The CoC Twitter account (COC_ACS) has been open for almost three months and has nearly 250 followers. The NAPBC Twitter account (NAPBC_ACS) opened almost a year ago and has more than 700 followers. Following the success of the NAPBC Twitter account, our newest social media endeavor is Facebook. Make sure you like the NAPBC Facebook page. If you have suggestions on ways to enhance our social media efforts, please contact Susan Rubin.
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New family of small RNAs boosts cell proliferation in cancer
Thomas Jefferson Universityvia Medical Xpress
Since their discovery in the 1950s, transfer RNAs have been best known for their role in helping the cell make proteins from messenger RNA templates. However, recent studies have led to a previously unsuspected concept that tRNAs are not always the end product; namely, they further serve as a source of small RNAs. Now researchers have discovered a new species of tRNA-derived small RNAs that are produced only in hormonally driven breast and prostate cancers, and which contribute to cell proliferation.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    'Smarter' ordering of breast biomarker tests could save millions in healthcare dollars (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine via Medical Xpress)
CDC pushes prevention as melanoma rates double (USA Today)
Breast cancer false alarms have a negative impact on women's health (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
Colorectal cancer cells reverted to normal functioning cells in lab (Medical News Today)
Findings could help improve patient care, reduce cancer screening costs around the world (News-Medical.Net)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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