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Surgical treatment for metastatic melanoma of the liver increases overall survival in a select group of patients
ACS
Surgical resection markedly improves survival among metastatic melanoma patients whose disease is isolated to a few areas in the liver, according to new study findings published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. These results mark a departure for melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer that is most often considered fatal once it has spread to the liver and then, not amenable to surgical treatment.
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2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification
Commission on Cancer
All Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited programs scheduled for survey during 2015-2016 should note that the Program Activity Record (PAR) Annual Update period will run from July 1 to September 30, 2014. In order to maintain your CoC accreditation, your program must complete this activity within the specified timeframe. No extensions will be granted. Questions about the PAR or Annual Update should be e-mailed to SAR@facs.org. Questions regarding your CoC Datalinks user ID and password should be emailed to CoCdatalinks@facs.org.
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New hope for women with early-stage breast cancer
News-medical.net
Women with early-stage breast cancer may now receive a one-dose radiation treatment at the same time as lumpectomy surgery, eliminating the need to return to the hospital daily for up to six weeks for postsurgical radiation treatments. The relatively new treatment option available at Rush, intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), delivers one precise, concentrated dose of radiation to the tumor site immediately following surgical removal of the cancer.
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The NAPBC wants to hear from you
NAPBC
The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a quality program of the American College of Surgeon (ACS), is looking for your feedback regarding future education program topics and locations. No matter your current NAPBC accreditation status (currently NAPBC accredited, in the process of re-accreditation, in the application phase, or considering NAPBC accreditation), your input is valuable. Please take a few minutes to help us set the future direction of NAPBC education by responding to the three-question survey. Follow NAPBC on Twitter! @NAPBC_ACS
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  13.7 Million Survivors and Counting
Since the 2005 IOM report, "From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor...", CoC, NAPBC, and NCBC have all focused on this important care domain. Here's to redoubling all of our efforts on behalf of the increasing population of cancer survivors!
   Select survivorship citations
   Adler newsletter article
   ASCO summary
 


Preop chemoradiation fails to improve survival in early esophageal cancer
Cancer Network
Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) did not improve resection rates or survival outcomes in patients with early-stage, locally advanced esophageal cancer, according to results of a new phase III randomized trial. Compared with surgery alone, NCRT actually increased postoperative mortality rates. Recent research has suggested that NCRT could provide benefit in esophageal cancer, but its effect in early-stage disease had not been well studied.
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Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
Commission on Cancer
Plan now to attend Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in San Antonio, Texas, on Friday, September 12, 2014. The program agenda will provide information on how to meet the standards and prepare for your accreditation survey. Review the program brochure and see for yourself why the February program sold out! Register today, and do not forget to make your hotel reservation while space is still available.
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Risk of hospitalization increased for childhood cancer survivors, even years after treatment
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Survivors of childhood cancers were hospitalized more often and had longer hospital admissions many years after cancer treatment was completed, compared with the general population. Survivors were 52 percent more likely to be hospitalized, and their number of admissions was 67 percent higher, compared with age- and sex-matched persons who did not have cancer. Survivors were 35 percent more likely to have stayed longer every time they were hospitalized, compared with controls.
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Glioblastoma tumors exhibit more cellular diversity than previously thought
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Glioblastoma is the most common and most aggressive form of brain cancer in adults. An exciting new study has characterized the cellular diversity in glioblastoma tumors from patients. This step may pave the way for the development of new treatments. "Glioblastoma is an incurable disease. There are existing therapies that may target 99 percent of the cells, but the tumor always comes back. Understanding the cellular landscape can provide a blueprint for identifying new therapies that target each of the various subpopulations of cancer cells and ultimately help us tailor therapy to individual patient tumors," said co-senior author Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD, professor of pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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Mayo Clinic: Proton therapy has advantages over IMRT for advanced head and neck cancers
Science Codex
A new study by radiation oncologists at the Mayo Clinic reviewing the world's literature on outcomes of proton beam therapy in the treatment of a variety of advanced head and neck cancers of the skull base versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has found that proton beam therapy significantly improved disease-free survival and tumor control when compared with IMRT. The results appear in the journal Lancet Oncology.
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U.S. hospital study aims to rapidly test lung cancer drugs
Boston.com
A bold new way to test cancer drugs recently began in hundreds of hospitals around the U.S. In a medical version of speed dating, doctors will sort through multiple experimental drugs and match patients to the one most likely to succeed based on each person’s unique tumor gene profile. It’s a first-of-a-kind experiment that brings together five drug companies, the government, private foundations, and advocacy groups.
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MM-398 plus chemotherapy extended OS, PFS in metastatic pancreatic cancer
Healio
The addition of the novel agent MM-398 to chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin significantly extended OS and PFS among patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, according to study results presented at the ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer. "Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer or pancreatic cancer in general have very limited options," researcher Andrea Wang-Gillam, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the division of oncology at Washington University, said in a press release.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Game changer for leukemia therapy (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
Presurgical SPECT/CT shows more cancer than current standard (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
Aspirin may cut pancreatic cancer risk (The New York Times)
3-D mammograms improve breast cancer detection, drive down false alarms (Los Angeles Times)
2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification (Commission on Cancer)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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