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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit July 15, 2015


 

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Cardio-oncology services may improve patient care if more widely available
Oncology Nurse Advisor
The impact of cancer treatments on cardiovascular health is an important consideration when treating oncology patients, but many hospital training programs have no formal training or services in cardio-oncology. A lack of national guidelines and funding are frequent barriers to establishing such programs, according to results of a nationwide survey published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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The double mastectomy rebellion
The Wall Street Journal
After she was diagnosed with cancer in her left breast last fall, Chiara D'Agostino turned to two holistic healers, a psychotherapist, a massage therapist, a hospital social worker, a meditation class and two support groups to help her navigate a frightening new world. One piece of advice she doesn't plan to follow: her doctor's. The surgeon recommended a single mastectomy along with chemotherapy and radiation. But many women in the support groups argued that she should get both breasts removed.
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Value in cancer care: But at what price?
Medscape
VideoBrief John L. Marshall, M.D., writes: "I want to welcome you to this edition of Medscape Oncology Insights, coming to you live from the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, where all oncologists migrate at the end of May. I'm joined today by two fabulous experts to talk about possibly the hottest two topics in cancer medicine today: value and outcomes. Everybody is talking about them. These have been themes driven throughout the meeting this year."
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AJCC Registrar curriculum Module IV available today
ACS
The American Joint Committee on Cancer Curriculum for Registrars launched in January 2015. The curriculum was designed to provide education in a step-wise learning environment, complete with additional resources to reinforce the information and webinars with interactive quizzes to prompt discussion and serve as a self-assessment for the information learned. This is self-guided, adult learning, and you are expected to review the lessons before attending the live or recorded webinars.
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Researchers achieve 1st total synthesis of cancer-killing shishijimicin A
Phys.Org
Rice University scientists have achieved the total synthesis of a scarce natural marine product that may become a powerful cancer-fighting agent – the molecule shishijimicin A. A group led by world-renowned Rice chemist K.C. Nicolaou announced the successful synthesis this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. The complex organic molecule was discovered in a rare sea squirt, Didemnum proliferum, more than a decade ago. Lab tests at the time proved it to be more than 1,000 times as toxic to cancer cells as the anticancer drug taxol (aka paclitaxel), but its scarcity did not provide amounts sufficient for extensive biological studies and clinical trials.
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  Navigators Light the Way

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Palliative care in cancer: When does the discussion begin?
The American Journal of Managed Care
Palliative care discussions are now starting earlier in oncology, as patients and providers realize that palliative care does not equal end-of-life care. A team effort, palliative care requires communication among providers, caregivers, the patient and the family in order to achieve the patient's goals for pain and symptom management alongside curative therapy. However, not all clinics or healthcare systems have integrated palliative care into their care plan. While a palliative care physician and nurse might be considered a vital part of the cancer care team at one clinic, a conversation on pain management or end-of-life care may not even occur at others.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword PALLIATIVE CARE.


Register now for Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Baltimore on Sept. 11. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards are a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer. Register today.
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Nearly 15 million women have no access to GYN oncology care
Healio
Each year in the United States, more than 9 percent of women who have gynecologic cancers face barriers to care due to distance, according to recently published data in Gynecologic Oncology. "Based on our estimates, it's likely that more than 7,000 women with gynecologic cancers per year experience distance-related barriers to accessing appropriate care from a specialist. Increased travel time to a specialty center likely prevents many patients from being appropriately evaluated and may decrease their likelihood of receiving the standard of care or accessing clinical trials for ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers," Dr. David I. Shalowitz, division of gynecological oncology, University of Pennsylvania, said.
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US: Tainted cancer drugs can cause stroke; nationwide recall is expanded
Global Research
A diagnosis of cancer is devastating. But cancer sufferers who have followed medical provider advice to undergo treatment with so-called cancer-fighting drugs may have unknowingly been exposed to the additional risk of stroke or other life-threatening medical event.
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Sitting may hike cancer risk in women
Psych Central
Researchers from the American Cancer Society find that more leisure time sitting was associated with a higher total cancer risk in women. Risk for multiple myeloma, breast and ovarian cancers were specifically elevated. The higher risk was present even after taking into account BMI, physical activity and other factors. No association was found between sitting time and cancer risk in men.
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Can prenatal gene tests spot cancer in mom-to-be?
WebMD
Abnormal results on noninvasive, prenatal genetic tests don't always indicate a problem with the fetus. In some cases, these tests may uncover maternal cancers, a new study reports. "If the test comes back abnormal, the patient should not panic," said study researcher Dr. Diana Bianchi, executive director of the Mother Infant Research Institute at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. "It doesn't necessarily mean anything is wrong with the fetus."
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    ASCO endorses ASTRO guideline on radiation therapy after surgery for endometrial cancer (American Society of Clinical Oncology)
Findings suggest improvement in management of localized prostate cancer (The JAMA Network Journals via Medical Xpress)
Mammograms may not reduce breast cancer deaths (Fox News)
New studies expand the BRCA equation in breast cancer (OncLive)
Why it is important to predict which lymphoma patients may relapse early (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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