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Five myths may compromise care of patients with brain metastases
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A blue-ribbon team of national experts on brain cancer said that professional pessimism and out-of-date myths rather than current science may compromise the care of patients with cancer that has metastasized to the brain. Assumptions underlying key clinical trials in the past are now out-of-date, and some physicians have lumped together brain metastases without regard to the primary site of the cancer. This has resulted in less-than-optimal care for individual patients.
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Studies suggest men still overtreated for prostate cancer
Healthline
Prostate cancer, the most common cancer among American men, continues to be overtreated in the wake of late-2011 medical guidelines recommending that doctors simply monitor some nonaggressive forms of the disease, according to two new studies published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Only one-fifth of men older than 65 diagnosed between 2006 and 2009 with low-risk prostate cancers got the recommended, noninvasive "watch-and-wait" treatment, according to one of the studies.
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Young Hispanic men face rising testicular cancer rates
Reuters
Testicular cancer rates are increasing more than three percent per year among young Hispanic men, at a time when rates among non-Hispanic white men are remaining steady, according to a new study. Testicular tumors are already among the most common cancers for men between 15 and 39 years old. But they are also among the most curable, with more than 90 percent of men living at least 10 years after diagnosis.
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Free webinar on cancer pathology reporting using the eCC to help you meet CoC Standard 2.1
CoC
If you are from a Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited program, plan now to attend the free webinar entitled “Fulfilling CoC Cancer Pathology Reporting Requirements with the CAP eCC” on Thursday, July 24 from 1:00 to 2:00 pm central time. Learn how the CAP electronic Cancer Checklists (eCC) can help your institution meet the CoC requirements for Standard 2.1, regarding the CAP Cancer Protocols and synoptic pathology reporting. Discover how the CAP eCC can help ensure that all required elements are included in your pathology report, simplify your presurvey internal quality review processes, generate a synoptic report to meet CoC Commendation-level requirements, and integrate the CAP eCC into your AP-LIS work flow using CAP eFRM software. Register now while space is available.
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Type of anesthesia used during breast cancer surgery may affect the risk of cancer recurrence
Medical Xpress
Breast cancer is one of the main causes of cancer-related death in women. According to the National Cancer Registry, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed form of cancer in Ireland, representing 32 percent of all cancer diagnosis every year. New research findings by University College Dublin scientists published in the British Journal of Anesthesia indicate that the type of anesthetic used during a surgical procedure could affect the metastatic potential of cancer cells — that is, their ability to spread to other parts of the body.
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DNA work offers clues for stomach cancer research
Medical News Today
Genetic scientists have developed a technology that shows how genes in healthy stomach cells are altered when they become cancerous, offering the prospect of changing the way the stomach cancer is diagnosed and managed. The study, reported in the scientific journal, Nature Communications, overcame the problem that large amounts of DNA are needed for current methods to investigate certain features of cancerous stomach cells.
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2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification
Commission on Cancer
All Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited programs scheduled for survey during 2015-2016 should note that the Program Activity Record (PAR) Annual Update period will run from July 1 to September 30, 2014. In order to maintain your CoC accreditation, your program must complete this activity within the specified timeframe. No extensions will be granted. Questions about the PAR or Annual Update should be e-mailed to SAR@facs.org. Questions regarding your CoC Datalinks user ID and password should be e-mailed to CoCdatalinks@facs.org.
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Team finds new route for ovarian cancer spread
Medical Xpress
Circulating tumor cells spread ovarian cancer through the bloodstream, homing in on a sheath of abdominal fatty tissue where it can grow and metastasize to other organs, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Cancer Cell. "This completely new way of thinking about ovarian cancer metastasis provides new potential avenues to predict and prevent recurrence or metastasis," said senior author Anil Sood, MD, professor of gynecologic oncology and reproductive medicine and cancer biology.
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How strongly does tissue decelerate the therapeutic heavy ion beam?
Phys.org
Irradiation with heavy ions is suitable in particular for patients suffering from cancer with tumors that are difficult to access, for example, in the brain. These particles hardly damage the penetrated tissue but can be used in such a way that they deliver their maximum energy only directly at the target: The tumor. Research in this relatively new therapy method is focused again and again on the exact dosing: How must the radiation parameters be set in order to destroy the cancerous cells "on the spot" with as little damage as possible to the surrounding tissue?
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Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
Commission on Cancer
Plan now to attend Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in San Antonio, Texas, on Friday, September 12, 2014. The program agenda will provide information on how to meet the standards and prepare for your accreditation survey. Review the program brochure and see for yourself why the February program sold out! Register today, and do not forget to make your hotel reservation while space is still available.
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Nanoliposome formulation improves drug delivery and survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Adding MM-398, a novel nanoliposome formulation of irinotecan, to standard treatment improves survival for metastatic pancreatic cancer patients who have already received gemcitabine. This study was presented at the European Society for Molecular Oncology (ESMO) 16th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona, Spain.
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UGA researchers use nanoparticles to enhance chemotherapy
Online Athens
University of Georgia (UGA) researchers have developed a new formulation of cisplatin, a common chemotherapy drug, that significantly increases the drug's ability to target and destroy cancerous cells. Cisplatin may be used to treat a variety of cancers, but it is most commonly prescribed for cancer of the bladder, ovaries, cervix, testicles, and lung. It is an effective drug, but many cancerous cells develop resistance to the treatment.
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The NAPBC wants to hear from you
NAPBC
The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a quality program of the American College of Surgeon (ACS), is looking for your feedback regarding future education program topics and locations. No matter your current NAPBC accreditation status (currently NAPBC accredited, in the process of re-accreditation, in the application phase, or considering NAPBC accreditation), your input is valuable. Please take a few minutes to help us set the future direction of NAPBC education by responding to the three-question survey. Follow NAPBC on Twitter! @NAPBC_ACS
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Early ADT for prostate cancer fails to improve survival
Urology Times
Androgen deprivation therapy provides no survival benefit in older men with localized prostate cancer at 15 years, newly published research shows. Study findings, from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick, appear online in JAMA Internal Medicine. Researchers used information from 66,717 Medicare patients aged 66 years and older diagnosed with clinical stage T1-T2 prostate cancer between 1992 and 2009.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Surgical treatment for metastatic melanoma of the liver increases overall survival in a select group of patients (ACS)
New hope for women with early-stage breast cancer (News-medical.net)
2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification (Commission on Cancer)
U.S. hospital study aims to rapidly test lung cancer drugs (Boston.com)
Preop chemoradiation fails to improve survival in early esophageal cancer (Cancer Network)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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