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Study shows promise of precision medicine for most common type of lymphoma
National Institutes of Health
A clinical trial has shown that patients with a specific molecular subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are more likely to respond to the drug ibrutinib (Imbruvica) than patients with another molecular subtype of the disease. The study appeared online recently in Nature Medicine.
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Experts flag potential harm of indiscriminate cancer screening
Today
As health screening packages offering to detect tumor markers become increasingly common, experts have warned of the potential harm caused by indiscriminate cancer screening, with a public-sector oncologist calling for service providers to rethink cancer screening that is not evidence-based. Screening is undesirable if it merely finds a cancer earlier or finds more cancers without helping to prolong survival and reduce long-term relapse, wrote Dr. Raymond Ng of the National Cancer Centre Singapore in an article titled "Too Much Medicine: Time to Stop Indiscriminate Cancer Screening" last month.
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Increased radiation offers no survival benefit for patients with low-risk prostate cancer
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine via Medical Xpress
Increased radiation dose is associated with higher survival rates in men with medium- and high-risk prostate cancer, but not men with low-risk prostate cancer, according to a new study from Penn Medicine published recently in JAMA Oncology. Already-high survival rates for men with low-risk prostate cancer were unaffected by higher radiation dosages compared with lower radiation dosages.
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Molecule identified that facilitates spread of prostate cancer
Medical News Today
For the first time, a single molecule has been identified that could be central to the mechanism of spread by prostate cancer. The study is published in the journal Cancer Cell and was completed by researchers from the Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. The results offer a target for the development of a drug that could prevent metastasis in prostate cancer — and possibly other cancers, too.
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Attend the Aug. 25 AJCC Curriculum Module — registrars earn 2 free
CE hours

ACS
The AJCC Curriculum for Registrars Module IV lessons are now available, and the Lesson 28 webinar will be held on Aug. 25. Completing it provides two CE hours for free. Register now and prepare by reviewing the self-study lessons. Please view the Module I, Module II and Module III recorded webinars if you missed them since each module builds upon the previous one, and no information will be repeated. Additional information is available on the AJCC website.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Two Breast Certifications - One Location!

The National Consortium of Breast Centers is offering the Breast Patient Navigator and Clinical Breast Examiner Certification program in one location. The Navigator certification exam will be on Friday, August 14th and the day and a half CBE program on the 15th and 16thth at University Health Systems in Knoxville.
 


Immunotherapy is the future of cancer research: 70 percent of multiple myeloma patients find recovery with new treatment
Medical Daily
Immunotherapy, or the use of a person's own immune system to treat an infection or disease, has recently been at the forefront of cancer research. In a new study, researchers found that a form of immunotherapy could produce a "significant clinical response" in 70 percent of patients with a particularly deadly type of cancer known as multiple myeloma. These results not only highlight the potential of this exciting new field but also the importance of further immunotherapy research.
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Evolution 'not just mutation' drives development of cancer
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus via Medical Xpress
A paper published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues against the commonly held "accumulation of mutations" model of oncogenesis in favor of a model that depends on evolutionary pressures acting on populations of cells. Basically, the paper states that the ecosystem of a healthy tissue landscape lets healthy cells out compete ones with cancerous mutations. It is when the tissue ecosystem changes due to aging, smoking, or other stressors that cells with cancerous mutations can suddenly find themselves the most fit, allowing their population to expand over generations of natural selection.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  insight2oncology™: Cancer Data at Your Fingertips
CHAMPS Oncology’s new web-based system transforms cancer data into actionable information for strategic planning, operational and financial decisions.
  • CHAMPS Seeks i2o™ Early Adopters
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War metaphors in breast cancer — 'brave' word angers some
HealthNewsReview
A recent campaign by the Centers for Disease Control is called Bring Your Brave and aims to get younger women between 18 and 44 to pay attention to their risks for breast cancer. But some in the breast cancer advocacy community are calling foul on the campaign's use of language, which they say is uncomfortably reminiscent of the "war" metaphor that has long pervaded cancer discussions.
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Researchers find clues to resistance in HER2-positive breast cancer
Cancer Network
Differences in HER2 homodimers on breast cancer cells may result in functional differences, with possible implications for metastasis and drug resistance, according to the results of a study published in Science Advances. Using a novel fluorescence-based imaging technique, researchers found that HER2 homodimers — two HER2 transmembrane proteins linked together — form clusters at the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells that likely contribute to the ability of these cells to translocate to other parts of the body.
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Register now for Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Baltimore on Sept. 11. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards are a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer. Register today.
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'Pill on a string' could help spot early signs of cancer of the gullet
Medical News Today
A "pill on a string" developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge could help doctors detect oesophageal cancer — cancer of the gullet — at an early stage, helping them overcome the problem of wide variation between biopsies, suggests research published in the journal Nature Genetics. The "cytosponge" sits within a pill that, when swallowed, dissolves to reveal a sponge that scrapes off cells when withdrawn up the gullet. It allows doctors to collect cells from all along the gullet, whereas standard biopsies take individual point samples.
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Celebrity impact on breast cancer screening
News-Medical.Net
Angelina Jolie received widespread media attention in 2013 when she told the public that she'd tested positive for BRCA1, a gene associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers, and subsequently had a double mastectomy. Now research shows that this publicity did influence some women's intentions to seek out similar genetic testing.
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Disrupted sleep cycles linked to breast cancer: Shift work may be dangerous, but it's necessary in a modern world
Medical Daily
A new study provides evidence that irregular sleep patterns may lead to cancer, a finding that lends support to previous research suggesting the night shift may be damaging to workers' health. "To our knowledge, this is the first study that unequivocally shows a link between chronic [light/dark] inversions and breast cancer development," wrote the authors. Though further research is needed, the researchers say women with a family risk of breast cancer should never work a night shift. In a 24-hour world economy, their recommendation may be increasingly difficult to follow.
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New tool for investigating RNA gone awry
Medical News Today
RNA is a fundamental ingredient in all known forms of life — so when RNA goes awry, a lot can go wrong. RNA misregulation plays a critical role in the development of many disorders, such as mental disability, autism and cancer. A new technology — called "sticky-flares" — developed by nanomedicine experts at Northwestern University offers the first real-time method to track and observe the dynamics of RNA distribution as it is transported inside living cells.
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Shape-shifting molecular cousins are the key to DNA repair
Cancer Research UK
It's taken years of frustration and dedication (not to mention countless hours spent in a small room roughly the temperature of a domestic fridge), but the hard work has finally paid off. Our researchers Martin Taylor and Simon Boulton at the Francis Crick Institute have solved a decades-old biological mystery and publishing the results of their molecular sleuthing in the journal Cell.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    ASCO endorses ASTRO guideline on radiation therapy after surgery for endometrial cancer (American Society of Clinical Oncology)
Findings suggest improvement in management of localized prostate cancer (The JAMA Network Journals via Medical Xpress)
Mammograms may not reduce breast cancer deaths (Fox News)
New studies expand the BRCA equation in breast cancer (OncLive)
Why it is important to predict which lymphoma patients may relapse early (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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