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Novel genomic changes identified in most common form of lung cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. Knowledge of these genomic changes may expand the number of possible therapeutic targets for this disease and potentially identify a greater number of patients with treatable mutations because many potent cancer drugs that target these mutations already exist.
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Gabapentin no better than standard therapy for prevention of delayed CINV
HemOnc Today
The anticonvulsant and analgesic agent gabapentin did not significantly improve delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting compared with standard therapy, according to results of a phase 2, double blind, placebo-controlled study. More than 50 percent of patients who undergo moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy experience delayed nausea, and anywhere from one-third to one-half of patients experience delayed vomiting.
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Free webinar on cancer pathology reporting using the eCC to help you meet CoC Standard 2.1
CoC
If you are from a Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited program, plan now to attend the free webinar entitled “Fulfilling CoC Cancer Pathology Reporting Requirements with the CAP eCC” on Thursday, July 24 from 1:00 to 2:00 pm central time. Learn how the CAP electronic Cancer Checklists (eCC) can help your institution meet the CoC requirements for Standard 2.1, regarding the CAP Cancer Protocols and synoptic pathology reporting. Discover how the CAP eCC can help ensure that all required elements are included in your pathology report, simplify your presurvey internal quality review processes, generate a synoptic report to meet CoC Commendation-level requirements, and integrate the CAP eCC into your AP-LIS work flow using CAP eFRM software. Register now while space is available.
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    Improving tumor radiation therapy: When basic ions break DNA down
    Phys.org
    A new study relevant for cancer radiation therapy shows that DNA building blocks are susceptible to fragmentation on contact with the full range of ions from alkaline element species. Scientists now have a better understanding of how short DNA strands decompose in microseconds. A European team found new fragmentation pathways that occur universally when DNA strands are exposed to metal ions from a family of alkaline and alkaline earth elements.
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    Scientists map one of the most important proteins in life — and cancer
    R&D Magazine
    Scientists have revealed the structure of one of the most important and complicated proteins in cell division — a fundamental process in life and the development of cancer — in research published in Nature. Images of the gigantic protein in unprecedented detail will transform scientists' understanding of exactly how cells copy their chromosomes and divide and could reveal binding sites for future cancer drugs.
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    Removing both breasts may not improve survival from breast cancer
    TIME
    Researchers at the University of Minnesota confirm that when it comes to treating some forms of breast cancer, drastic surgery to remove breast tissue may not help in improving survival from the disease. Reporting in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the scientists describe a model for calculating life expectancy based on recent rates of recurrent cancers among women with stage 1 or stage 2 disease.
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    2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification
    Commission on Cancer
    All Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited programs scheduled for survey during 2015-2016 should note that the Program Activity Record (PAR) Annual Update period will run from July 1 to September 30, 2014. In order to maintain your CoC accreditation, your program must complete this activity within the specified timeframe. No extensions will be granted. Questions about the PAR or Annual Update should be e-mailed to SAR@facs.org. Questions regarding your CoC Datalinks user ID and password should be e-mailed to CoCdatalinks@facs.org.
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    Study: HPV test better than Pap for assessing cervical cancer risk
    Fox News
    Testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) may be the best way to know whether a woman is at risk of developing cervical cancer in the near future, according to a new study. Negative HPV tests provided women with more reliable assurance that they wouldn’t develop cancer or other abnormal cervical changes in the next three years, compared with traditional Pap tests, researchers report.
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    Antibody halts cachexia from cancer
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    New research raises the prospect of more effective treatments for cachexia, a profound wasting of fat and muscle occurring in about half of all cancer patients, raising their risk of death. In mice bearing lung tumors, their symptoms of cachexia improved or were prevented when given an antibody that blocked the effects of a protein, PTHrP, secreted by the tumor cells. PTHrP stands for parathyroid hormone-related protein and is known to be released from many types of cancer cells.
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    Bladder cancer prognosis unaffected by smoking status
    Renal & Urology News
    Smoking status and the time of smoking cessation prior to diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) does not alter the risks of disease recurrence or progression, according to a new study. Researchers led by Lambertus A. Kiemeney, PhD, of Radboud University Medical Center in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, and colleagues studied 963 NMIBC patients. The group included 181 never smokers (18.8 percent), 490 former smokers (50.9 percent), and 292 current smokers (30.3 percent) at the time of diagnosis.
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    Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
    Commission on Cancer
    Plan now to attend Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in San Antonio, Texas, on Friday, September 12, 2014. The program agenda will provide information on how to meet the standards and prepare for your accreditation survey. Review the program brochure and see for yourself why the February program sold out! Register today, and do not forget to make your hotel reservation while space is still available.
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    Labeling technique during noninvasive tumor imaging could predict response to chemotherapy
    Medical Xpress
    Being able to view tumor blood vessels without a surgical procedue or potent dyes can improve understanding of the environment in which a tumor grows. Now, a team of researchers, including Chang-Tong Yang from the A*STAR Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, have developed a contrast agent that selectively labels the tumor blood vessel network for use in noninvasive tumor imaging studies.
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    Some with prostate cancer may not get best advice
    HealthDay News via Web MD
    Many men may not be getting the best advice when it comes to managing low-risk prostate cancer, two new studies suggest. In the first study, researchers found that most men are getting their prostate removed or undergoing radiation therapy when carefully watching the cancer may be just as effective without the risks and side effects of a surgical procedure or radiation.
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    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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