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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit July 29, 2015


 

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Free NCCN Pocket Guidelines available for antiemesis, melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer
National Comprehensive Cancer Network
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) is pleased for offer a pocket-sized version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for antiemesis, melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer while supplies last. These printed versions of the NCCN Guidelines® are conveniently sized to fit in a lab coat pocket and serve as a valuable reference tool for physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other oncology healthcare professionals.
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Radiation ups survival in prostate cancer, but not low risk
Medscape
Dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy appears to improve overall survival in men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer, but not in those with low-risk disease, according to new data. The findings were published online recently in JAMA Oncology. In this retrospective analysis, researchers found that for men with low-risk disease, incremental increases in dose were not associated with a difference in survival.
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Cellular 'cheaters' give rise to cancer
The New York Times
Maybe it was in "some warm little pond," Charles Darwin speculated in 1871, that life on Earth began. A few simple chemicals sloshed together and formed complex molecules. These molecules, over great stretches of time, joined in various combinations, eventually giving rise to the first living cell: a self-sustaining bag of chemistry capable of dividing and spawning copies of itself. While scientists still debate the specifics, most subscribe to some version of what Darwin suggested — genesis as a fortuitous chemical happenstance. But the story of how living protoplasm emerged from lifeless matter may also help explain something darker: the origin of cancer.
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FDA approves new daily pill for common skin cancer
Medical News Today
The United States regulators have approved a new drug for the treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinoma, a form of skin cancer.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword PALLIATIVE CARE.


What young cancer patients aren't being told about their fertility
CBS News
A cancer diagnosis is devastating for anyone, but for young people it comes with an added concern: the possibility that the disease or its treatment will leave them unable to have children. There are ways to help many young cancer patients preserve their fertility, but a new study finds patients often are not aware of the options. The study, published recently in the journal Cancer, finds young women, especially, may not receive enough information before treatments have already limited their options.
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  Two Breast Certifications - One Location!

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New drug for blood cancers now in 5 phase II clinical trials
University of California - San Diego via Medical Xpress
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have established the safety and dosing of a new drug for treating blood cancers. The findings were published online July 27 in The Lancet Haematology. The drug is a small molecule inhibitor that suppresses the activity of a signaling pathway believed to contribute to a variety of blood cancers' eventual resistance to standard chemotherapy treatments. More specifically, preclinical research, funded in part by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, has shown that the drug coaxes dormant cancer stem cells, residing in the bone marrow, to begin differentiating and exit into the blood stream, where they can be destroyed by chemotherapy agents targeting dividing cells.
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Scientists identify another frequently mutated gene in melanoma
Medical News Today
The part played by genetic mutations in the development of melanoma is well established, and many genes and genomic changes involved have been identified. However, in around 30 percent of melanomas, the genetic culprits are less clear. Now, a new study has defined a subgroup of mutations that are present in a significant number of melanomas and identifies a new major player.
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Register by July 31 to avoid fee increase for Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Baltimore on Sept. 11. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards are a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer. Register before July 31 and receive a reduced rate.
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Could one-two punch of generics for breast cancer be more powerful than wonder drug tamoxifen?
The Washington Post
First marketed in the 1960s as a fertility drug, tamoxifen has been hailed as a miracle drug for its ability to prevent and treat breast cancer, and despite decades of research scientists have not been able to find anything comparable — until now. In a study published in The Lancet, researchers found that a class of inexpensive, existing generic called aromatase inhibitors, which suppress hormones, reduce recurrence rates by 30 percent as compared with tamoxifen. That confirmed what researchers had believed for several years. But a separate finding about the effect of the drug on death risk was a surprise.
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Rehab before cancer treatment can help patients bounce back
NPR
Cancer patients who do rehabilitation before they begin treatment may recover more quickly from surgery, chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer specialists say. But insurance coverage for cancer prehabilitation, as it's called, can be spotty, especially if the aim is to prevent problems rather than treat existing ones. It seems intuitive that people's health during and after invasive surgery or a toxic course of chemo or radiation can be improved by being as physically and psychologically fit as possible going into it. But research to examine the effect of prehab is in the beginning stages.
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Attend the Aug. 25 AJCC Curriculum Module — registrars earn 2 free
CE hours

ACS
The AJCC Curriculum for Registrars Module IV lessons are now available, and the Lesson 28 webinar will be held on Aug. 25. Completing it provides two CE hours for free. Register now and prepare by reviewing the self-study lessons. Please view the Module I, Module II and Module III recorded webinars if you missed them since each module builds upon the previous one, and no information will be repeated. Additional information is available on the AJCC website.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study shows promise of precision medicine for most common type of lymphoma (National Institutes of Health)
Experts flag potential harm of indiscriminate cancer screening (Today)
Increased radiation offers no survival benefit for patients with low-risk prostate cancer (University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine via Medical Xpress)
Immunotherapy is the future of cancer research: 70 percent of multiple myeloma patients find recovery with new treatment (Medical Daily)
War metaphors in breast cancer — 'brave' word angers some (HealthNewsReview)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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