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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit August 05, 2015


 

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Study: Women not getting lifesaving cancer treatment
NBC News
It's a treatment that can raise the dismal survival rate from ovarian cancer by 10 percentage points, but most women who should be getting it aren't. A new study shows just 41 percent of eligible women are getting chemotherapy delivered directly to the affected area, even though the benefits are so strong that the National Cancer Institute has made a rare recommendation for doctors to use it. The therapy involved infusing strong chemotherapy drugs directly into a patient's abdomen alongside more traditional intravenous infusions.
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CoC announces mid-year OAA recipients
ACS
Congratulations to the 20 CoC-accredited programs that have received the 2015 Outstanding Achievement Award. Award criteria were based on qualitative and quantitative surveys conducted during the first half of 2015. Read more.
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Study: The pill has prevented 200,000 cases of cancer
TIME
Oral contraceptives have prevented 200,000 cases of endometrial cancer in the last decade, according to new research published recently. In the new study, published in the journal The Lancet Oncology, researchers looked at data from 27,276 women with endometrial (uterine) cancer and 115,743 women without it from 36 different studies. They estimate in their findings that 400,000 cases of endometrial cancer have been prevented due to women taking oral contraceptives in the past 50 years, and 200,000 of these prevented cases are from the last 10 years.
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Calculating leukemia progression
Inderscience via Medical Xpress
A new computational study published in the International Journal of Bioinformatics Research and Applications has shown how mutations that give rise to drug resistance occur in a form of cancer known as acute myeloid leukemia. Juan Carlos Martinez and S.S. Iyengar of Florida International University and Nelson Lopez-Jimenez and Tao Meng of the University of Miami explain how cancer cells undergo genetic mutations as the disease progresses. Unfortunately, for the patient some of these mutations can give rise to new proteins that protect the cancer from the effects of anticancer drugs. A similar effect is seen in bacterial infection when microbes become resistant to antibiotics.
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Interaction between prostate cancer, comorbidities increases venous thromboembolism risk
Healio
High levels of comorbidities considerably increased venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk among patients with prostate cancer, according to results of a national cohort study. The clinical interaction between prostate cancer and those comorbidities accounted for nearly one-third of VTEs among that patient population, results showed. Consequently, the ability to reduce VTEs associated with comorbidities may help improve the prognosis of patients with prostate cancer, researchers wrote.
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  Benefits of NCBC Facility Membership for Breast Centers

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Biomarker discovery offers 'glimmer of hope'
Medical News Today
Triple-negative breast cancer is one of the most aggressive types of breast cancer. It has few treatment options, making the prognosis poor for affected women. But these women may now have a "glimmer of hope." Researchers reveal they have identified a potential drug target for the disease.
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Pre-order ACS Clinical Congress Webcasts and save
ACS
Register to attend the ACS Clinical Congress in Chicago, Oct. 4-8, and you can preorder the Webcasts today. This year's Clinical Congress includes more than 15 panel sessions in the Surgical Oncology Track that cover a variety of topics. For detailed information, please visit the Clinical Congress 2015 Web page. Note: Webcasts will be made available after Nov. 15. Purchase provides access to the 2015 Webcast sessions and expires Dec. 31, 2016.
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Prostate cancer divided into 5 distinct types
Medscape
The great hope in prostate cancer is for a test that would differentiate between patients with aggressive disease who need intensive treatment and those patients with mild forms of the disease, who may not need treatment. Much effort has gone into looking for genetic markers that could do this, and now a team of researchers from the United Kingdom says they have made a breakthrough. They have identified five distinct genetic types of prostate cancer and say that their classification performs better than previously reported genetic signatures and that it is better at identifying the most aggressive cancers than established clinical measures such as prostate-specific antigen levels and Gleason score.
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Are shared medical appointments the future for cancer care?
Oncology Times
Shared medical appointments may provide an innovative approach to caring for cancer patients, especially in the survivorship years, according to a recent literature review in Journal of Oncology Practice. And while more research is needed to help determine the best use of the approach in cancer settings, those authors and other experts interviewed for this article say that further evaluation is warranted.
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Neuroblastoma cancer cells weaken immune system 'like kryptonite'
Medical News Today
A new molecule found in the cancer cells of neuroblastoma — a rare cancer that primarily affects young children — holds the key to developing an effective treatment for the disease, according to a new study published in Cancer Research.
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Molecular tinkering doubles cancer drug's efficacy
Duke University via Medical Xpress
Researchers have packaged a widely used cancer drug into nanoparticles, more than doubling its effectiveness at destroying tumors. The drug paclitaxel has been used for decades to fight breast, ovarian, lung and other cancers, but its effectiveness has been limited by its small molecular size and insolubility in water — properties that allow the body to clear the drug too quickly, reducing its accumulation in tumors
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Free NCCN Pocket Guidelines available for antiemesis, melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (National Comprehensive Cancer Network)
Could one-two punch of generics for breast cancer be more powerful than wonder drug tamoxifen? (The Washington Post)
Cellular 'cheaters' give rise to cancer (The New York Times)
FDA approves new daily pill for common skin cancer (Medical News Today)
Scientists identify another frequently mutated gene in melanoma (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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