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Study shows that third gene is indicator for breast cancer
The New York Times
Mutations in a gene called PALB2 raise the risk of breast cancer in women by almost as much as mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the infamous genes implicated in most inherited cases of the disease, a team of researchers reported. Previous data had indicated that mutations in PALB2 were linked to breast cancer, and many genetic tests already screen for them, but it had not been clear to what extent these mutations raised a carrier’s odds of developing the disease.
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Surgical treatment for metastatic melanoma of the liver increases overall survival
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Surgical resection markedly improves survival among patients with metastatic melanoma whose disease is isolated to a few areas in the liver, according to new study findings. These results mark a departure for melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer, which is most often considered fatal once it has spread to the liver and then not amenable to surgical treatment.
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2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification
Commission on Cancer
All Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited programs scheduled for survey during 2015-2016 should note that the Program Activity Record (PAR) Annual Update period will run from July 1 to September 30, 2014. In order to maintain your CoC accreditation, your program must complete this activity within the specified timeframe. No extensions will be granted. Questions about the PAR or Annual Update should be e-mailed to SAR@facs.org. Questions regarding your CoC Datalinks user ID and password should be e-mailed to CoCdatalinks@facs.org.
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Accreditation 101 — register now
Commission on Cancer
Plan now to attend Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in San Antonio, Texas, on Friday, Sept. 12, 2014. The program agenda will provide information on how to meet the standards and prepare for your accreditation survey. Review the program brochure and see for yourself why the February program sold out! Register today, and do not forget to make your hotel reservation while space is still available.
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FDA approves first DNA-based test for colon cancer
The Associated Press via CNBC
The Food and Drug Administration recently approved the first screening test for colon cancer that uses patients' DNA to help spot potentially deadly tumors and growths. The Cologuard test from Exact Sciences detects irregular mutations in stool samples that can be an early warning sign of cancer. Patients who test positive for the mutations should undergo a colonoscopy to confirm the results.
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    Study: U.S. lung cancer rates falling overall
    HealthDay News via WebMD
    Overall lung cancer rates are dropping, according to a new analysis of nearly half a million Americans with lung cancer, but the news wasn't all good. The study researchers from the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) also found that the rates of certain types of lung cancer are increasing. Over nearly three decades, the overall lung cancer rate has dropped approximately 12 percent, said the study's lead author Denise Riedel Lewis, an epidemiologist at the NCI.
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    Comorbid conditions determined appropriate age for cancer screening cessation
    HemOnc Today
    Models that account for individuals’ comorbid conditions may help determine the age at which they should stop undergoing breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer screenings, according to study results. “The presence of other illnesses should inform decisions about when to stop screening older people for cancer,” Iris Lansdorp-Vogelaar, PhD, of the department of public health at Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands, told HemOnc Today.
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    Transoral surgery for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma
    OncLive
    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been steadily increasing over the last few decades, mostly due to HPV, which is now associated with the majority of newly diagnosed cases of OPSCC. If current trends continue, projections indicate that HPV-related OPSCC may constitute the majority of all head and neck cancers by the year 2025. These patients are likely to be nonsmokers and are typically younger, with higher education levels and socioeconomic status than tobacco-related OPSCC patients.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Surgery better than endoscopy for some early esophageal cancers (DOTmed)
    Scientists discover gene that prevents lung cancer metastasis (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
    2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification (Commission on Cancer)
    Patient navigation may lead to better breast cancer care in high risk and minority women (News-medical.net)
    Genomic analysis of prostate cancer indicates best course of action after surgery (Medical Xpress)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Survival better with surgical resection than with endoscopic resection for early esophageal cancer
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    A study sheds new light on the risks associated with the growing popularity of endoscopic resection in the treatment of localized, early-stage esophageal cancer. Researchers found that the more traditional surgical resection, while more invasive, provided significantly better outcomes (five-year survival rate 87.6 percent) for patients than endoscopic resection (five-year survival rate 76 percent).
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    Pancreatic cancer still the deadliest
    Medical Daily
    In four decades, the long-term survival rate of pancreatic cancer has not improved. With the highest mortality rate of all major cancers, 94 percent of pancreatic cancer patients die within five years of diagnosis. Additionally, 74 percent of patients die within the first year, according to the Hirshberg Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research. These numbers are only a fraction lower than the statistics in the early 1970s.
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    Glioblastoma triple therapy revs up immune system
    Drug Discovery & Development
    A triple therapy for glioblastoma, including two types of immunotherapy and targeted radiation, has significantly prolonged the survival of mice with these brain cancers, according to a new report by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. Mice with implanted, mouse-derived glioblastoma cells lived an average of 67 days after the triple therapy, compared with mice that lasted 24 days when they received only the two immunotherapies.
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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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