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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Aug. 14, 2013


 



Breast cancer drugs may be used to treat lung cancer
Medical News Today
Scientists have discovered that experimental drugs developed as treatments for ovarian and breast cancer could be used to treat lung cancer, according to a study published in the journal Oncogene. Researchers from The Institute of Cancer Research in London have revealed that drugs called poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors could help treat around 50 percent of non-small cell lung cancer tumors.
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Revolutionary technology reveals how cancer chromosome abnormalities form in cells
Science World Report
For the first time, scientists have directly observed events that lead to the formation of a chromosome abnormality that is often found in cancer cells. The abnormality, called a translocation, occurs when part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attached to another chromosome.
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Autism's unexpected link to cancer genes
The New York Times
Researchers studying two seemingly unrelated conditions — autism and cancer — have unexpectedly converged on a surprising discovery. Some people with autism have mutated cancer or tumor genes that apparently caused their brain disorder.
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What role can employers play in cancer prevention and treatment?
Phys.Org
Employers can have a significant role in improving efforts to prevent and treat diseases such as cancer by introducing and supporting health promotion programs in the workplace. Together, companies can influence healthcare policies and reimbursement and industry practices to support the fight against cancer.
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'Prehabilitate' patients with cancer prior to treatment
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Persons who have just learned that they have cancer can benefit from cancer prehabilitation, interventions that take place between diagnosis and treatment initiation. "There is a growing body of scientific evidence that supports preparing newly diagnosed patients and optimizing their health before starting acute treatments," wrote Drs. Julie K. Silver and Jennifer Baima, both of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, in what they describe as the first review of cancer prehabilitation.
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Statins do not reduce colorectal cancer risk
TeleManagement
Although some studies have suggested a possible benefit for statin therapy in reducing the risk of a colorectal cancer in some individuals, a study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research adds to the growing body of evidence that finds statins to not be protective against colorectal cancer. Researchers from Harvard Medical School and their colleagues studied data from the adenoma prevention with celecoxib trial, which was designed to evaluate whether or not the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib could be used to prevent colorectal cancer.
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'Dark-horse' molecule is a potential new anti-cancer target
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research via MedicalXpress
Australian researchers have identified a molecule called interleukin-11 as a potential new target for anti-cancer therapies. Until now, the importance of interleukin-11 in cancer development has been underestimated, but researchers have recently identified this molecule as a "dark horse" for the development of cancer.
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Individualized breast cancer screening catches more cancer
HealthDay News via Doctors Lounge
A breast cancer screening program tailored to participants' individual risk profiles has a higher-than-expected breast cancer detection rate in 40- to 49-year-old women, according to a pilot study published in the August issue of Radiology. Dr. Elena Venturini, from San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan, invited 3,017 40- to 49-year-old women to participate in a breast cancer screening program tailored to lifetime risk and mammographic density with supplemental ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging and bilateral two-view microdose mammography.
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Protein that accelerates age, brakes cancer news
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Researchers have found that a protein responsible for accelerated aging disorders can dramatically slow down the spread of cancers. The team revealed that prelamin A, responsible for accelerated aging in a condition called progeria, can prevent the progression of malignant or cancerous tumors.
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Metabolic 'fingerprinting' of tumors could help bowel cancer patients
Imperial College London via News-Medical.Net
Bowel cancer is the third most common type of cancer globally, with more than 1 million new cases diagnosed every year. Accurately determining the stage that a tumor has reached is crucial for deciding which treatments to offer.
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University of Pennsylvania training dogs to sniff out ovarian cancer
CBS News
Studies have shown that dogs might have the ability to sniff out cancer. If true, the method could provide a cheap and potentially noninvasive way to detect the disease. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Working Dog Center are training three dogs how to sniff out samples that contain ovarian cancer markers.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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