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A possible explanation for why brain tumors are more common, and more harmful, in males
Oncology Nurse Advisor
New research helps explain why brain tumors occur more often in males and frequently are more harmful than similar tumors in females. For example, glioblastomas, the most common malignant brain tumors, are diagnosed twice as often in males, who suffer greater cognitive impairments than females and do not survive as long. The researchers found that retinoblastoma protein (RB), a protein known to reduce cancer risk, is significantly less active in male brain cells than in female brain cells.
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Aspirin, NSAID painkillers may reduce breast cancer recurrence for some
CBS News
Obese women who have battled breast cancer might halve their chances of a recurrence if they take aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) regularly, new research suggests. The researchers followed 440 breast cancer survivors — most of them past menopause and overweight or obese — who were diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. The women had estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, which requires the hormone estrogen to grow.
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Accreditation 101 — Register now
Commission on Cancer
Plan now to attend Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in San Antonio, Texas, on Friday, Sept. 12, 2014. The program agenda will provide information on how to meet the standards and prepare for your accreditation survey. Review the program brochure and see for yourself why the February program sold out! Register today, and do not forget to make your hotel reservation while space is still available.
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Cancer and the secrets of your genes
The New York Times
On Aug. 6, researchers announced in The New England Journal of Medicine that they had found that mutations in a gene called PALB2 greatly increase the risk of breast cancer. This is one of the biggest developments since the discovery of the role of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in breast and ovarian cancer in the 1990s. The response among patients has been predictable. One woman’s e-mail summed it up: “I’d like to get an entire genome scan to rule out a hidden cancer diagnosis.”
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Partial nephrectomy offers near equivalent lengths of cancer control compared with radical nephrectomy
News-medical.net
Needle-guided tumor destruction procedures offer near equivalent lengths of local cancer control compared with surgical procedures for patients with small kidney cancer tumors, according to the results of a large study published in the journal European Urology. "If validated, these data suggest that an update to clinical guidelines would be warranted," says the study's lead author, R. Houston Thompson, MD, a Mayo Clinic urologist.
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    Molecular panel increases likelihood that initial surgery for thyroid cancer is corrective
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    Routine use of a molecular testing panel greatly decreased the need for an initial lobectomy to confirm diagnosis in patients with thyroid nodules and cancer, reported researchers. The test improved the chances of patients undergoing the correct initial surgery by 30 percent. “Before this test, [approximately] 1 in 5 potential thyroid cancer cases could not be diagnosed without an operation to remove a portion of the thyroid,” said lead author Linwah Yip, MD, assistant professor of surgery at the School of Medicine of the University of Pittsburgh and surgical oncologist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pennsylvania.
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    2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification
    Commission on Cancer
    All Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited programs scheduled for survey during 2015-2016 should note that the Program Activity Record (PAR) Annual Update period will run from July 1 to Sept. 30, 2014. In order to maintain your CoC accreditation, your program must complete this activity within the specified timeframe. No extensions will be granted. Questions about the PAR or Annual Update should be e-mailed to SAR@facs.org. Questions regarding your CoC Datalinks user ID and password should be e-mailed to CoCdatalinks@facs.org.
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    Study: Many seniors get unnecessary cancer tests
    HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
    Older people who aren't expected to live more than 10 years are still being screened for prostate, breast, cervical, and colon cancer even though it is unlikely to benefit them, a new study finds. Unnecessary screening can lead to invasive procedures, such as biopsies, and unneeded treatments, including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, all of which can affect quality of life without extending it, the researchers said.
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    Radiotherapy plus chemotherapy drive risk of pancreatic cancer in HL patients
    The Oncology Report
    Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) survivors who undergo both radiotherapy and chemotherapy face an increased risk of subsequent pancreatic cancer, an intervention case-control study demonstrated. In fact, the risk was 18-fold among those who received subdiaphragmatic radiation delivered at 10 Gy or higher in addition to six or more cycles of chemotherapy that contained an alkylating agent.
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    Cancer research: Not a one-size-fits-all approach
    Wired
    In the not-so-distant past, all people with cancer were treated with a one-size-fits-all approach. But thanks to recent advances in genome sequencing technologies and super computers, it’s now possible to ferret out the genetic mutations and other molecular abnormalities that underlie certain cancers. This information is one of the most important resources cancer patients can have, because it can allow doctors to tailor treatments to the unique aspects of their cancer.
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    Two experts discuss mammography issues on The Recovery Room Show
    NAPBC
    The Recovery Room Show recently launched a new episode discussing the benefits and controversies surrounding mammographic screening. In the episode, host Frederick L. Greene, MD, FACS, a surgical oncologist from Charlotte, NC, and a member of the Commission on Cancer since 2000, talks with two leading experts in the field. The show includes a discussion on common concerns with mammography, the role of insurance companies, MRIs, and a high-profile recent Canadian study that cast doubt on the abilities of the screening tool.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Study shows that third gene is indicator for breast cancer (The New York Times)
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    2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification (Commission on Cancer)
    Study: U.S. lung cancer rates falling overall (HealthDay News via WebMD)
    Surgical treatment for metastatic melanoma of the liver increases overall survival (Oncology Nurse Advisor)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     
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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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