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Exclusive: U.S. approval of Merck cancer immunotherapy expected soon
Reuters
U.S. regulators are likely to approve Merck & Co's highly anticipated immuno-oncology drug, pembrolizumab, as a treatment for melanoma well ahead of a late October deadline, according to three sources familiar with the situation. If approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the drug would be the first in a promising new class designed to help the body's own immune system fend off cancer by blocking a protein known as Programmed Death receptor (PD-1) or a related target known as PD-L1, used by tumors to evade disease-fighting cells.
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Best to stage esophageal cancer after neoadjuvent chemo
Cancer Network
The stage of esophageal adenocarcinomas after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is significantly more predictive of outcomes than the stage determined prior to therapy, according to a new study. Restaging after the treatment can help clinicians more accurately and effectively decide on surgery or other courses of treatment.
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2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification
Commission on Cancer
All Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited programs scheduled for survey during 2015-2016 should note that the Program Activity Record (PAR) Annual Update period will run from July 1 to Sept. 30, 2014. In order to maintain your CoC accreditation, your program must complete this activity within the specified timeframe. No extensions will be granted. Questions about the PAR or Annual Update should be e-mailed to SAR@facs.org. Questions regarding your CoC Datalinks user ID and password should be e-mailed to CoCdatalinks@facs.org.
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Diabetics' elevated risk for pancreatic cancer persisted long after diagnosis
HemOnc Today
A review of 15 case-control studies confirmed individuals with diabetes have an excess risk for pancreatic cancer. Results showed a 30 percent excess risk for pancreatic cancer persisted for more than 20 years after diabetes diagnosis. That finding supports a causal role of diabetes in pancreatic cancer, according to researchers.
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Novel Pap test may be more accurate in detecting cervical cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A clinical trial is underway that may provide women with a more accurate way to detect cervical cancer. The clinical research study includes undergoing a Pap test and HPV screening to determine how to more effectively evaluate a woman's chance of developing cervical cancer. When treated early, the chances of effectively treating and curing cervical cancer increase dramatically.
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    Accreditation 101 — Register now
    Commission on Cancer
    Plan now to attend Accreditation 101 — Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in San Antonio, Texas, on Friday, Sept. 12, 2014. The program agenda will provide information on how to meet the standards and prepare for your accreditation survey. Review the program brochure and see for yourself why the February program sold out! Register today, and do not forget to make your hotel reservation while space is still available.
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    Bacterial biosurgery promising for reducing size of inoperable tumors
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    Areas that remain untouched by chemotherapy and radiation can be found deep within most tumors. These troublesome spots lack the blood and oxygen needed for traditional therapies to work but provide the perfect target for a new cancer treatment using bacteria that thrive in oxygen-poor conditions. Recently, researchers demonstrated that injections of a weakened version of one such anaerobic bacteria, the microbe Clostridium novyi, shrunk tumors in rats, pet dogs, and a human patient.
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    PET/CT after one chemotherapy cycle highly prognostic in Hodgkin's lymphoma
    HemOnc Today
    Negative PET/CT after one cycle of chemotherapy accurately predicted favorable outcomes among patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, according to results of a prospective, international, multicenter study. Prior studies showed negative PET/CT after two cycles of chemotherapy predicted favorable prognosis.
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    New NAPBC education program announced
    NAPBC
    The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a quality program of the American College of Surgeons, will be holding Pursing Excellence Through NAPBC Accreditation in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 14. Watch your e-mail for additional information or send an e-mail to NAPBC@facs.org.
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    Women with severe, chronic health issues are screened for breast cancer less often
    Medical Xpress
    Women with severe disabilities and multiple chronic conditions are screened for breast cancer less often than women with no disabilities or no chronic conditions, a new study has found. They are also screened less often than women with moderate disabilities or women with only one chronic condition, according to Dr. Sara Guilcher, an affiliate scientist with the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital.
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    Botox may have cancer fighting role
    BBC News
    Botox injections — beloved by those seeking a wrinkle-free face — may help fight cancer, animal tests suggest. The study, published in Science Translational Medicine, showed nerves help stomach cancers grow. Research on mice found that using the toxin to kill nerves could halt the growth of stomach tumors and make them more vulnerable to chemotherapy.
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    Two experts discuss mammography issues on The Recovery Room Show
    NAPBC
    The Recovery Room Show recently launched a new episode discussing the benefits and controversies surrounding mammographic screening. In the episode, host Frederick L. Greene, MD, FACS, a surgical oncologist from Charlotte, NC, and a member of the Commission on Cancer since 2000, talks with two leading experts in the field. The show includes a discussion on common concerns with mammography, the role of insurance companies, MRIs, and a high-profile recent Canadian study that cast doubt on the abilities of the screening tool.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Study shows that third gene is indicator for breast cancer (The New York Times)
    FDA approves first DNA-based test for colon cancer (The Associated Press via CNBC)
    2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification (Commission on Cancer)
    Study: U.S. lung cancer rates falling overall (HealthDay News via WebMD)
    Surgical treatment for metastatic melanoma of the liver increases overall survival (Oncology Nurse Advisor)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     
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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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