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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit September 02, 2015


 

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What to watch for after skin cancer
The Wall Street Journal
Non-melanoma skin cancer, already the most common type of cancer in the U.S., puts patients at an increased risk not only for more skin cancer, but for other potentially more serious cancers. New research shows a sharp rise in non-melanoma skin cancers, so dermatologists and cancer groups are pushing patients who have a history of even one occurrence to be more vigilant about regular checkups. They are emphasizing the need for continued use of sunscreen, sun avoidance and protective clothing, which can help prevent future malignancies even when sun damage has already been done.
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'1999-2012 Cancer Incidence and Mortality Data'
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
This Web-based report includes the official federal statistics on cancer incidence from registries that have high-quality data and cancer mortality statistics for each year and 2008–2012 combined. It is produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute.
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ASCO updates policy on cancer susceptibility genomic testing
Genomeweb
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) released an updated policy statement recommending ways in which advanced genomic testing tools may be utilized appropriately for assessing cancer risk. In the statement, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, ASCO also recommended "appropriate regulation of tests that detect inherited genetic variants," provided its support for risk-based US Food and Drug Administration regulation of laboratory-developed tests and commercial assays and called for improved insurance coverage for genetic counseling and cancer risk assessments.
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Online registration closes 4 pm CT, Sept. 2 — limited space available
ACS
This is your last chance to attend Accreditation 101 in 2015. This program being held on Sept. 11 in Baltimore provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards are a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer.

You may still be able to register on-site, space permitting, at the on-site rate of $950.

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The association between obesity and gastrointestinal cancer
Cancer Therapy Advisor
Obesity is now recognized as one of the foremost modifiable cancer risk factors. Numerous, large-scale epidemiological studies have demonstrated that there is a clear association between the risk of cancer development at a number of sites and raised body mass index. Despite an expanding body of epidemiological evidence in support of the link between obesity and cancer, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible are poorly characterized.
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  NCBC Membership... Where Do You Fit In?

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NAPBC and CoC provide online poster to observe Breast Cancer Awareness Month
ACS
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) and the Commission on Cancer (CoC) encourage your program to promote the event and use it as an opportunity to display/promote your accreditation status. To help you publicize this event within your program and the community, the NAPBC and the CoC have created a poster that you can download and print. Programs that are solely CoC accredited or accredited by both the CoC and NAPBC can access the poster by logging into CoC Datalinks and clicking on Marketing Resources Staff and NAPBC-accredited breast centers can log into the NAPBC portal and click on the "2015 Breast Cancer Awareness Month Poster" link in the "View Downloadable Center Resources" section to access the marketing resources Web page. For more information, contact srubin@facs.org.
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Leukemia drug could be used to sabotage metabolism of cancer cells
Medical News Today
Scientists may have developed a new method of making cancer cells vulnerable to treatment by targeting an enzyme that is crucial to their survival. Hexokinase2, the enzyme in question, is vital for glucose metabolism in cancer cells. By destroying this metabolic enzyme, methods of treatment may stop cancer cells from making use of absorbed glucose and stored nutrients, leading them to die.
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Pre-order ACS Clinical Congress Webcasts and save
ACS
Register to attend the ACS Clinical Congress in Chicago, Oct. 4-8, and you can preorder the Webcasts today. This year's Clinical Congress includes more than 15 panel sessions in the Surgical Oncology Track that cover a variety of topics. For detailed information, please visit the Clinical Congress 2015 Web page. Note: Webcasts will be made available after Nov. 15. Purchase provides access to the 2015 Webcast sessions and expires Dec. 31, 2016.
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Register now for Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Baltimore on Sept. 11. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards are a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer. There's still time to register.
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'Tumor paint' determines the precise location and size of primary brain tumors
Mosaic via Medical Xpress
In 2004, Dr. Richard Ellenbogen spent almost 20 hours operating on a 17-year-old girl with a brain tumor. He ended up leaving a big piece of the tumor behind, mistaking it for normal brain tissue. Less than a year after the surgery, the cancer hit back, and the young girl died. The week the girl died, Ellenbogen presented the case at his team's weekly meeting at Seattle Children's Hospital. "There's got to be a way to take more of the tumour out and leave more of the normal brain intact," he sighed in frustration.
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Immunotherapy combinations for renal cell carcinoma offer promise, challenges
Cancer Therapy Advisor
Immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown significant clinical benefits in many tumor types, including renal cell carcinoma. The complexity of these pathways' mechanism of action allows them to be interrupted by multiple drugs at different stages, and a number of recent and ongoing studies are investigating the potential for the inclusion of combination therapies.
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New biomarker in breast and prostate cancer may help identify patients who will respond to taxanes
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Researchers have identified a novel genetic biomarker responsible for the progression of many breast and prostate cancers. The finding could bolster efforts to better identify patients who respond to certain types of chemotherapy drugs that attack the most aggressive forms of cancer. Their findings were published in Scientific Reports. "Understanding and identifying biomarkers is a vital step toward cancer research and care," said lead author Michael Freeman, Ph.D., vice chair of research in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery in Los Angeles. "New profiling strategies exemplified by this study will ultimately improve our ability to treat cancer patients."
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Newly engineered CAR T cells can better discriminate between cancer and normal cells
American Association for Cancer Research via Medical Xpress
A new development in engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, called affinity tuning, can make the CAR T cells spare normal cells and better recognize and attack cancer cells, which may help lower the toxicity associated with this type of immunotherapy when used against solid tumors, according to a preclinical study.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Stress and cancer: Mindfulness is pivotal component to improve outcomes (Healio)
Promising target for new drugs found in pancreatic cancer cells (University of Houston via Medical Xpress)
Surgery, radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer 'may not reduce mortality' (Medical News Today)
Diagnostic model predicts impending death in patients with cancer (Healio)
Study: Reprogramming cancer cells back to normal looks feasible (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC and the NAPBC.


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