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Major breakthrough in understanding acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Scientists have discovered mutations in genes that lead to childhood leukemia of the acute lymphoblastic type, which is the most common childhood cancer in the world. The study was conducted among children with Down's syndrome, who are 20 to 50 times more prone to childhood leukemias than other children. The study involved analyzing the DNA sequence of patients at different stages of leukemia.
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2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification
Commission on Cancer
All Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited programs scheduled for survey during 2015-2016 should note that the Program Activity Record (PAR) Annual Update period will run from July 1 to Sept. 30, 2014. In order to maintain your CoC accreditation, your program must complete this activity within the specified timeframe. No extensions will be granted. Questions about the PAR or Annual Update should be e-mailed to SAR@facs.org. Questions regarding your CoC Datalinks user ID and password should be e-mailed to CoCdatalinks@facs.org.
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What polyp removal says about colon cancer risk
HealthDay News via WebMD
Doctors may be performing too many repeat colonoscopies on people who've had precancerous polyps removed during an earlier colon cancer screening, a new Norwegian study suggests. Many of these patients have no greater risk of dying from colon cancer than the general public, the researchers determined.
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Carcinogenic role of a protein in liver decoded
Medical Xpress
The human protein EGFR controls cell growth. It has mutated in the case of many cancer cells or exists in excessive numbers. For this reason, it serves as a point of attack for target-oriented therapies. A study group at the Comprehensive Cancer Centre of Medical University of Vienna and AKH Vienna, under the guidance of Maria Sibilia from the Institute for Cancer Research, has now discovered that the risk of this protein does not — as previously assumed — depend on its presence within the tumor cell, but rather from its activity in the cells adjacent to the tumor.
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Medicaid office visit pay linked to more cancer screening
Oncology Practice
Higher payment rates for office visits — but not higher payment rates for the tests themselves — translate into more cancer screenings for Medicaid patients, a study showed. Increasing cancer screening among Medicaid patients is a priority, as previous studies have found these patients less likely to be screened for breast, cervical, or colon cancer than people with private insurance. Medicaid patients are also more likely to present with advanced-stage cancers.
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    Low-dose computed tomography scanning for patients at risk for lung cancer
    HCP Live
    The leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women is lung cancer. The 5-year survival rate of lung cancer is only 16 percent, as 75 percent of patients with lung cancer are presented with symptoms of advanced disease. When lung cancer is diagnosed at an early stage (Stage 1 or Stage 2), the five-year survival increases to nearly 52 percent. Detecting lung cancer early is the key to improving survival.
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    New NAPBC education program announced
    NAPBC
    The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a quality program of the American College of Surgeons, will be holding Pursing Excellence Through NAPBC Accreditation in Washington, DC, on November 14. Watch your e-mail for additional information or send an e-mail to NAPBC@facs.org.
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    Novel breast cancer agents aimed at overcoming endocrine therapy resistance
    OncLive
    Although advances in endocrine therapy for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer have been made in recent years, de novo and acquired resistance to treatments remain important clinical problems, and efforts to identify effective modalities to overcome this challenge continue. "Novel approaches to improve the efficacy of endocrine therapy, while minimizing toxicity, are required,” said Dr. Lori J. Goldstein, director of the Breast Evaluation Center at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
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    Triple therapy revs up immune system against a common brain tumor
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    A triple therapy for glioblastoma, consisting of two types of immunotherapy and targeted radiation, has significantly prolonged the survival of mice with these brain cancers, according to a new report. Mice with implanted, mouse-derived glioblastoma cells lived an average of 67 days after the triple therapy, compared with mice that lasted 24 days when they received only the two immunotherapies.
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    Two experts discuss mammography issues on The Recovery Room Show
    NAPBC
    The Recovery Room Show recently launched a new episode discussing the benefits and controversies surrounding mammographic screening. In the episode, host Frederick L. Greene, MD, FACS, a surgical oncologist from Charlotte, NC, and a member of the Commission on Cancer since 2000, talks with two leading experts in the field. The show includes a discussion on common concerns with mammography, the role of insurance companies, MRIs, and a high-profile recent Canadian study that cast doubt on the abilities of the screening tool.
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    Where should cancer care be delivered and why?
    OncLive
    There is a growing chorus that seems to be debating separate issues—340B drug pricing, the sequester, site of service differential, and so on. But the debate revolves around a singular issue — where should cancer care be delivered? It is an uncontested fact that delivery of state-of-the-art oncology care is getting significantly more complex and expensive. Also, without question, the practice of oncology is currently migrating from the office (private practice/community) to the hospital (in other words, oncologist as employee) setting. Is this trend good for patients?
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Study shows that third gene is indicator for breast cancer (The New York Times)
    FDA approves first DNA-based test for colon cancer (The Associated Press via CNBC)
    2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification (Commission on Cancer)
    Study: U.S. lung cancer rates falling overall (HealthDay News via WebMD)
    Surgical treatment for metastatic melanoma of the liver increases overall survival (Oncology Nurse Advisor)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     
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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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