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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Sep. 11, 2013


 



ACS and CoC release lists of commonly used tests and treatments for patients to discuss with their surgeons
ACS
Groups aim to encourage physician and patient conversations by identifying five tests or procedures to question, highlighting potentially unnecessary — sometimes harmful — care in surgery and surgical oncology.

On Sept. 4, 2013, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer released separate lists of specific tests or procedures that are commonly ordered but not always necessary in surgery and surgical oncology as part of the Choosing Wisely® campaign, an initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation. The respective list from the ACS and the CoC identify five targeted, evidence-based recommendations that can support conversations between patients and physicians about what care is really necessary.
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A brand new look for AJCC
AJCC
Over the past year, AJCC volunteers and staff have worked to reaffirm and further define our mission to provide worldwide leadership in the development, promotion, and maintenance of evidence-based systems for the classification and management of cancer.

In the months ahead, we will announce many new changes and objectives for the organization.

We are pleased to introduce our new logo, website, and Twitter profile.

We hope you will enjoy AJCC's enhanced online presence as much as we do. We welcome your comments, thoughts, and suggestions. E-mail us or tweet using #AJCCLaunch.

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Low-dose CT lung screening has greater sensitivity than radiography
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Low-dose computed tomography (CT) lung screening is more sensitive than radiography, and predictors of cancer on low-dose CT have been identified, according to two studies published in the Sept. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
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FDA approves Abraxane for late-stage pancreative cancer
US Food and Drug Administration
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved uses of Abraxane (paclitaxel protein-bound particles for injectable suspension, albumin-bound) to treat patients with late-stage (metastatic) pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. An estimated 45,220 patients will be diagnosed and 38,460 will die from the disease in 2013, according to the National Cancer Institute. Surgery is the only option to permanently remove or cure pancreatic cancer, but it usually is too late for surgery by the time the cancer is diagnosed.
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New method for early detection of colon cancer
Science Daily
A new, highly sensitive method to detect genetic variations that initiate colon cancer could be readily used for noninvasive colon cancer screening, according to a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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Survivorship care plans empower patients
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A majority of cancer survivors gave the information provided through care plans a favorable rating, according to a new study that examined the online LIVESTRONG Care Plan. Providing patients who have completed cancer treatment with survivorship care plans was added to the criteria for Commission on Cancer accreditation of cancer centers, effective in 2015.
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FDA panel to address CT colon screening
MedPage Today
A panel of FDA advisers reviewed the effectiveness of CT colonography in screening asymptomatic patients for colon cancer during a meeting on Sept. 9. The Gastroenterology-Urology Panel and the Radiological Devices Panel — both subsets of the agency's Medical Devices Advisory Committee — also looked at CT colonography's safety, benefits, and role in screening asymptomatic patients during a joint meeting.
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Oncology OnTrack Supports Nurse Navigation
Oncology OnTrack is used to navigate patients with any cancer type from screening to diagnosis, treatment and survivorship, interfaces with other programs and supports accreditations.
EQUICARE CS - Cancer Navigation and Survivorship

Equicare CS is recommended by the American College of Surgeons as a best practice for providing all three facets of continuum of care services and has been listed in the CoC’s Best Practices Repository.


Radiation therapy for DCIS did not increase risk for cardiovascular disease
Healio
Women who underwent radiation therapy for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast demonstrated no additional risk for cardiovascular disease, according to results of a large population-based study presented at the Breast Cancer Symposium.
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Most breast cancer deaths occur in younger, unscreened women
U.S. News & World Report
New breast cancer research reveals a significant death rate among women under 50 who forgo regular mammograms and casts doubt on recent screening guidelines from a U.S. panel of experts. The findings support the merit of regular mammograms, especially for younger women, said study researcher Dr. Blake Cady, professor emeritus of surgery at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "I would propose that women start screening at age 40," Cady said. Younger women tend to have faster-growing, more aggressive tumors, experts say.
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Response-guided neoadjuvant chemo beneficial in breast cancer
MPR
For patients with early breast cancer, a response-guided neoadjuvant chemotherapy approach seems beneficial, according to a study published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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Deciding when to enter a palliative care unit
The New York Times
It’s a tough situation: you have a fatal condition. You require care beyond what family members can provide at home. But with a prognosis of more than six months to live, you are not ready for hospice care. And an intensive care unit is too, well, intense, to say nothing of expensive. So what do you do? Now there’s another option. Some hospitals are offering so-called palliative care units.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BREAST CANCER.


Laser-guided surgery finds brain cancer's boundary
BBC
Laser-guided surgery could improve the odds of removing all of a brain tumor by clearly highlighting its edges, U.S. researchers say. Surgeons are cautious with brain tumors, as removing the surrounding tissue could lead to disability. A technique, reported in Science Translational Medicine, used a laser to analyze the chemistry of the tissue and show the tumor in a different color.
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Cutting calories may improve response to cancer treatment
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Restricting calories for a defined period of time may improve the success of cancer treatment, according to new research. The study offers valuable new data on how caloric intake may play a role in programmed cancer cell death and in the efficacy of targeted cancer therapies. While previous studies suggest a connection between caloric intake and development of cancer, scientific evidence about the effect of caloric intake on the efficacy of cancer treatment has been rather limited to date.
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The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Andrew Plock, Content Editor, 469.420.2609  
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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