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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Sep. 18, 2013


 



Nanodiamonds improve chemo delivery to brain tumors
Drug Discovery & Development
Researchers at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of California, Los Angeles have developed a new drug delivery system using nanodiamonds that allows for direct application of chemotherapy to brain tumors with fewer harmful side effects and better cancer-killing efficiency than existing treatments.
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NAPBC Education Event - Lead Your Breast Program to Excellence
ACS
Plan today to attend the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) Lead Your Breast Program to Excellence Conference. This dynamic, two-day conference will include expert faculty who developed the standards. Hear how you can build quality programs into your multidisciplinary breast center by utilizing nationally recognized standards as your foundation. This two-day conference will be held November 15–16 in Chicago. Last year’s program was sold-out; don’t delay, registration is already filling up. Register TODAY!
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Researchers discover inherited PAX5 gene mutation causes acute lymphoblastic leukemia
BioNews Texas
Recent research led by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and the University of Washington discovered the first inherited gene mutation associated exclusively with acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurring in multiple relatives in individual families. The study was published in the online edition of the Nature Genetics.
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FDA panel approves drug to shrink breast-cancer tumors presurgery
CBS News
Doctors are calling the approval of a drug called Perjeta by a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel a historic moment in breast cancer treatment. The panel is approving the medication to shrink tumors before surgery in early-stage patients. The move comes more than a year after Perjeta was approved for late-stage patients. In 40 percent of the cases, it worked so well that surgeons couldn't find the tumor they planned to remove, according to the FDA.
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More than 1,100 have cancer after 9/11
CNN
Reggie Hilaire was a rookie cop on Sept. 11, 2001. He worked at ground zero for 11 days beside his colleagues -- many of them, including Hilaire, not wearing a mask. He was later assigned to a landfill in Staten Island, where debris from the World Trade Center was dumped. For about 60 days between 2001 and 2002, the New York police officer was surrounded by dust. In 2005, Hilaire was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. He underwent surgery and radiation. Just months later his doctor told him he also had multiple myeloma, a blood cancer that multiplies the body's plasma cells to dangerous levels. It's a cancer that usually strikes much later in life. Hilaire was 34.
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Gene networks predict cancer prognosis
U-T San Diego
Better cancer treatments can be found by studying the genetic networks they involve, according to a study published recently by UC San Diego researchers. The authors call this approach "network-based stratification," or NBS. It groups patients together who have mutations in similar networks, matching them with outcomes. The study examined ovarian, uterine, and lung cancers in The Cancer Genome Atlas.
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Diet quality linked to pancreatic cancer risk
Reuters
In a large new study of older Americans, researchers found that people with the healthiest eating habits are about 15 percent less likely to develop pancreatic cancer than those with the poorest diets. In the analysis of data on more than 500,000 Americans over age 50, men in particular, especially those who were overweight or obese, appeared to benefit most from a high-quality diet.
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Gene variations predict breast cancer sleep disturbance
Medwire News
Researchers have identified cytokine gene variations in women with breast cancer that may help to identify those at increased risk for sleep disturbance following surgery. They found that variants of three cytokine genes – interleukin-1 receptor 2 (IL1R2), IL13, and nuclear factor kappa beta 2 (NFKB2) – differed significantly between women with high sustained sleep disturbance and those with low sustained sleep disturbance following surgery for breast cancer.
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Oncology OnTrack Supports Nurse Navigation
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IOM declares cancer care crisis
MedPage Today
The rise in demand for cancer care, a shrinking provider workforce, growing health care costs, and an increasingly complex disease are creating a "crisis in cancer care delivery," the Institute of Medicine said recently. Therefore, a new course for cancer care needs to be charted that better coordinates care and improves data collection on outcomes and quality, the body said in a report on "Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care."
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A single protein affects susceptibility of cancer cells to chemotherapy
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A newly discovered weakness in cancer cells may make them more susceptible to chemotherapy and other treatments. The HDAC5 protein has been identified as essential for the maintenance of telomeres, which are structures within cancer cells that promote their longevity. Cancer cells with longer telomeres tend to be more resistant to therapies, and those with shorter telomeres tend to be more susceptible. By targeting the mechanism used by cancer cells to maintain telomeres, existing therapies could become far more effective at eradicating cancer than they are today.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BREAST CANCER.


Oncologists can stay in touch with their hospice patients
Medscape
There is no need to lose contact with your cancer patients once you have referred them to hospice care, a pair of oncologists write in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. "Although challenging, it can also be immensely gratifying to support patients and families whom we have come to know so well during this most difficult time in their lives," write doctors Mark R. Litzow and Timothy J. Moynihan, hematologists/oncologists from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
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Insurance companies dropping coverage of proton beam therapy for prostate cancer
MedCity News
As the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute completes its third year of treating cancer patients — half of them for prostate cancer — insurance companies across the country are dropping coverage for proton beam therapy for early stage prostate cancer. Most recently, Blue Shield of California announced it would join their ranks. Before that, Aetna Insurance, the nation's third largest insurer, stopped covering the procedure, and Cigna announced it would review its policy, according to Medscape Medical News, an online medical journal.
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Looking for lessons in cancer's 'miracle' responders
Reuters
Nearly every oncologist can tell the story of cancer patients who beat the odds, responding so well to treatment that they continued to live many years disease-free, while most of their peers worsened and eventually died. Dr. David Solit decided to find out why.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Andrew Plock, Content Editor, 469.420.2609  
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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