This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit September 24, 2014


 

Advertisement

High-risk leukemia subtype becomes more common with age
Oncology Nurse Advisor
More than one-quarter of young adults with the most common form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a high-risk subtype with a poor prognosis and may benefit from drugs widely used to treat other types of leukemia that are more common in adults, according to multi-institutional research. ALL is the most common childhood cancer. This research focused on the subtype known as Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL (Ph-like ALL). In 2009, scientists from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., working with the Children's Oncology Group (COG), were among the first to describe the Ph-like ALL subtype in children.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Advertisement


Second cancer: For many, it's the price of survival
Clinical Oncology
It’s one of the cruel truths about cancer: The price of survival comes with an increased risk for a second cancer. Although this has been known for decades, but what’s changed is that oncologists and primary care doctors are seeing a significant upsurge in patients with second cancers as survivors age — a “rising tide of second cancers,” according to one National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigator.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Finding risks, not answers in gene tests
The New York Times
Jennifer was 39 and perfectly healthy, but her grandmother had died young from breast cancer, so she decided to be tested for mutations in two genes known to increase risk for the disease. When a genetic counselor offered additional tests for 20 other genes linked to various cancers, Jennifer said yes. The more information, the better, she thought.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
SPONSORED CONTENT


New approach aims to silence cancer 'survival genes'
Medical Xpress
Scientists at the University of York are working on a promising new approach for tackling colorectal cancer, the second most common cause of cancer-related death. The new method works by silencing cancer "survival genes" and could potentially combat cancer through the selective killing of colorectal cancer cells without adverse effects on normal, noncancer cells.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Better classifications improve treatment planning for breast cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Breast cancer can be classified into 10 different subtypes, and scientists have developed a tool to distinguish each subtype. The research could improve treatments and targeting of treatments for the disease. Cancer arises due to genetic changes that cause normal cells to develop into tumors. As we learn more about breast cancer, we are seeing that it is not one single disease. The mutations in the genes that cause different cancers are not alike, and this is why tumors respond differently to treatment and grow at different rates. Currently, there are two key markers that clinicians use to predict response to treatments.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Navigators, Sunny California Welcomes You!
Sunny Southern California invites navigators in imaging, social work, clinical, diagnostics, nursing, and advocates to test for Breast Patient Navigator certification through NCBC, your premier interdisciplinary breast health membership organization that educates, develops, and supports breast health professionals worldwide.
  • www.bpnc.org
  • Application to attend
  • Hoag Invitation
  •  


    Organizing knowledge to enable personalization of medicine in cancer
    Genome Biology
    The landscape of the genomics of tumor progression and heterogeneity has seen incredible advancements in recent years with the maturation of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) and other large-scale tumor sequencing efforts. Software and workflow systems for predicting and annotating genomic changes have proliferated and continue to improve. Caregivers in the health care system will soon be faced with a large number of genomic alterations that are potentially relevant to understanding cancer progression and improving clinical decision-making for each individual patient. However, there are few resources to help with the prioritization and interpretation of these alterations in a clinical context.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification
    Commission on Cancer
    All Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited programs scheduled for survey during 2015-2016 should note that the Program Activity Record (PAR) Annual Update period will run from July 1 to Sept. 30, 2014. In order to maintain your CoC accreditation, your program must complete this activity within the specified timeframe. No extensions will be granted. Questions about the PAR or Annual Update should be e-mailed to SAR@facs.org. Questions regarding your CoC Datalinks user ID and password should be e-mailed to CoCdatalinks@facs.org.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Recent findings published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology support the Commission on Cancer's quality measure on use of needle biopsy to diagnose breast cancer (Commission on Cancer)
    What cancer patients want and what Medicare covers may differ (Reuters)
    Training dogs to sniff out cancer (The New York Times)
    Seven threats to cancer care (Medscape (login required))
    2014 Commission on Cancer Annual Update notification (Commission on Cancer)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Pursuing Excellence through NAPBC Accreditation
    NAPBC
    Whether you are preparing for a re-accreditation survey, first survey, or looking for information on the NAPBC this education program gives you the information you need.

    Pursuing Excellence through NAPBC Accreditation is the only-education program developed and taught by NAPBC staff, board members, and surveyors. This program prepares your breast center for survey and helps staff not familiar with the NAPBC standards, understand their role in the accreditation process.


    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Study uncovers genetic driver of inflammation, uses it to prevent and treat liver cancer
    Science Codex
    Inflammation has been shown to be a driving force behind many chronic diseases, especially liver cancer, which often develops due to chronic inflammation caused by conditions such as viral hepatitis or alcoholism and has relatively few effective treatment options. Now, scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have demonstrated for the first time in preclinical studies that blocking the expression of a gene known as astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) halts the development and progression of liver cancer by regulating inflammation. This research could impact not only the treatment of liver cancer, but many inflammation-associated diseases.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Two experts discuss mammography issues on The Recovery Room Show
    NAPBC
    The Recovery Room Show recently launched a new episode discussing the benefits and controversies surrounding mammographic screening. In the episode, host Frederick L. Greene, MD, FACS, a surgical oncologist from Charlotte, N.C., and a member of the Commission on Cancer since 2000, talks with two leading experts in the field. The show includes a discussion on common concerns with mammography, the role of insurance companies, MRIs, and a high-profile recent Canadian study that cast doubt on the abilities of the screening tool.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE
     
    Advertisement



    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
    Download media kit

    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
    Contribute news

    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


    Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

    This edition of The CoC Brief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

    Recent issues

    Sept. 17, 2014
    Sept. 10, 2014
    Sept. 3, 2014
    Aug. 27, 2014






    7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063