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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Oct. 2, 2013


 



Breast cancer: 'Critical gaps' found in research
Medical News Today
A new study published in the journal Breast Cancer Research has identified 10 "critical gaps" that exist in the research of the disease, which could see the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives if not addressed urgently. Researchers from the Institute of Cancer Research in London and the University of Dundee have conducted what they say is the most "comprehensive review of breast cancer to have ever taken place," called the Gap Analysis 2013, which has been facilitated by leading U.K. breast cancer charity Breast Cancer Campaign.
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Help us improve AJCC cancer staging resources!
ASC
The AJCC has commissioned a survey to solicit user feedback on the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, Handbook and Atlas. The AJCC will use this information to enhance current and future products.

After just 10 minutes of your time, all participants will be entered into a raffle for the chance to win one of ten $100 American Express gift cards. Click HERE to take the survey.

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Prostatic inflammation does not raise prostate cancer risk
Renal & Urology News
Histologic inflammation in prostate biopsy specimens is not associated with an elevated risk of subsequent prostate cancer, researchers concluded. Tytti H. Yli-Hemminki, MD, of Tampere University Hospital in Tampere, Finland, and colleagues studied 293 prostate biopsy specimens obtained during the first screening round of a Finnish population-based randomized screening trial for PCa, which began in 1996. The biopsies were performed because of an abnormal PSA value (4 ng/mL or higher or 3-4 ng/mL and free to total PSA ratio of 0.16 or less) or a positive digital rectal examination. None of the biopsy specimens were suspicious for cancer.
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New hope for treating cancer? Patterns seen in 12 types of tumors
Los Angeles Times
Examining the molecular profiles of tumors from 12 different types of cancers, scientists working with the National Institutes of Health-backed Cancer Genome Atlas said they had found striking similarities between tumors originating in different organs. Their discoveries, made possible by improvements in sequencing technologies and computing methods, could herald a day when cancers are treated based on their genetic profiles, rather than on their tissue of origin, said UC Santa Cruz biomolecular engineer Josh Stuart.
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A brand new look for AJCC
ACS
Over the past year, AJCC volunteers and staff have worked to reaffirm and further define our mission to provide worldwide leadership in the development, promotion, and maintenance of evidence-based systems for the classification and management of cancer.

In the months ahead, we will announce many new changes and objectives for the organization.

We are pleased to introduce our new logo, website, and Twitter profile.

We hope you will enjoy AJCC's enhanced online presence as much as we do. We welcome your comments, thoughts, and suggestions. E-mail us or tweet using #AJCCLaunch.

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Patient factors change risk for HRT-related breast cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
The impact of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on breast cancer risk varies according to patient race/ethnicity, body mass index, and breast density, researchers have learned. Their findings indicate that black women, obese women, and women whose breasts are less dense (contain more fatty tissue than connective tissue) may be the HRT users who incur the least excess risk for breast cancer.
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Roche's Perjeta wins approval for early breast cancer
Bloomberg
Roche Holding AG's Perjeta won expanded U.S. approval as the first presurgical therapy in breast cancer, increasing the odds the disease may be stopped in those diagnosed with early stage HER2-positive tumors. Perjeta, which is to be used in combination with Basel, Switzerland-based Roche’s older breast cancer medicine Herceptin, and chemotherapy, was approved under an accelerated process based on early clinical trials that showed the therapy reduced the size of tumors, the Food and Drug Administration said Sept. 30 in a statement.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BREAST CANCER.


Why the federal government wants to redefine the word 'cancer'
Forbes
The federal government wants to reduce the number of Americans diagnosed each year with cancer. But not by better preventive care or healthier living. Instead, the government wants to redefine the term “cancer” so that fewer conditions qualify as a true cancer. What does this mean for ordinary Americans — and should we be concerned?
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Researchers unveil findings on two new weapons against thyroid cancer
Medical Xpress
For many years, patients with advanced thyroid cancer faced bleak prospects and no viable treatment options. But now, building on recent discoveries about the genetics and cell signaling pathways of thyroid tumors, researchers are developing exciting new weapons against the disease, using kinase inhibitors that target tumor cell division and blood vessels. Two recent clinical trials led by a researcher from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania showcase the great promise of these new approaches.
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CQIP is coming
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC) is planning to release the first edition of an annual Cancer Quality Improvement Program (CQIP) report on Nov. 30, 2013, to each of its accredited cancer programs. This data-driven report will be customized for each facility. The report is based on the data your cancer program has submitted to the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) and will include comparisons data from your facility to national data from all CoC programs. Only members of your cancer program will be able to view your individual report. To prepare for the release, you need to review your performance rates for the 2010 and 2011 CP3Rs and make any requisite corrections by Nov. 1, as your performance on these measures will be incorporated into the CQIP as of that date. Please work with your registry staff to review your current CP3R data and reconcile any incorrect or missing data. Thank you for your help in making CQIP a success.
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Early tumor shrinkage in colorectal cancer suggests long-term Cetuximab benefit
Cancer Network
Colorectal cancer patients who have early tumor shrinkage after first-line treatment with chemotherapy plus Cetuximab may be more likely to have long-term response to therapy, according to an analysis of two large clinical trials. Hubert Piessevaux, MD, PhD, of the Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc in Brussels, and colleagues show that a more robust tumor response at eight weeks after start of therapy was associated with improved progression-free and overall survival. An early tumor shrinkage of 20 percent or more could identify patients, receiving a combination of chemotherapy plus Cetuximab, who had both longer progression-free and overall survival.
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Liquid biopsy could improve cancer diagnosis and treatment
Science Codex
A microfluidic chip developed at the University of Michigan is among the best at capturing elusive circulating tumor cells from blood—and it can support the cells' growth for further analysis. The device, believed to be the first to pair these functions, uses the advanced electronics material graphene oxide. In clinics, such a device could one day help doctors diagnose cancers, give more accurate prognoses, and test treatment options on cultured cells without subjecting patients to traditional biopsies.
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NAPBC education event — Lead Your Breast Program to Excellence
ACS
Plan today to attend the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) Lead Your Breast Program to Excellence Conference. This dynamic, two-day conference will include expert faculty who developed the standards. Hear how you can build quality programs into your multidisciplinary breast center by utilizing nationally recognized standards as your foundation. This two-day conference will be held Nov. 15–16 in Chicago. Last year’s program was sold out; don’t delay, registration is already filling up. Register TODAY!
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Genetic cause of childhood leukemia uncovered
Oncology Nurse Advisor
"We're in unchartered territory," said study author Kenneth Offit, MD, MPH, chief of the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, New York. "At the very least this discovery gives us a new window into inherited causes of childhood leukemia. More immediately, testing for this mutation may allow affected families to prevent leukemia in future generations."
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Stanford scientists build a microscope to spot the seeds of cancer
Stanford Report
The rule of thumb with cancer is that the earlier you can detect the disease, the more effective the treatment, and hence better potential outcomes. Currently, doctors draw a patient's blood and analyze it using special antibodies to detect the presence of the seeds, called circulating tumor cells (CTCs). This method works well if CTCs are present in large numbers, but may fail to detect smaller numbers released by earlier tumors. Now, a team of engineers, scientists, and doctors from Stanford is developing a mini-microscope that might be able to noninvasively detect the CTCs earlier than ever, allowing for earlier interventions.
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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