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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Oct. 16, 2013


 



Blood pressure drug may improve cancer treatment
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Losartan, an angiotensin inhibitor used to treat hypertension, may improve the delivery of chemotherapy drugs and oxygen to solid tumors, according to new research. When cancer-associated fibroblasts proliferate, they produce increased levels of collagen and a gel-like substance called hyaluronan. Collagen and hyaluronan exert physical forces that compress tumor blood vessels, reducing vascular perfusion. A study published in Nature Communications examined whether Losartan and similar drugs could decrease production of collagen and hyaluronan.
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Compound derived from vegetables shields rodents from lethal radiation doses
Medical Xpress
Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say a compound derived from cruciferous vegetable such as cabbage, cauliflower, and broccoli protected rats and mice from lethal doses of radiation. Their study, published Oct. 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the compound, already shown to be safe for humans, may protect normal tissues during radiation therapy for cancer treatment and prevent or mitigate sickness caused by radiation exposure.
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No benefit from dose-dense chemo in glioblastoma
MedPage Today
Intensified chemoradiation with temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma failed to improve survival or slow disease progression, according to results of a randomized trial. Patients randomized to conventional treatment with radiation therapy and temozolomide (Temodar) had a median overall survival of 16.6 months, whereas patients who received radiation and dose-dense temozolomide had a median survival of 14.9 months. Median progression-free survival was about a month longer with the dose-dense regimen, but the difference did not reach statistical significance, reported Mark R. Gilbert, MD, of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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Help us improve AJCC cancer staging resources!
ACS
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Some cancer patients may overdo oral meds
MedPage Today
One in five cancer patients took oral drugs too often or in higher-than-prescribed doses, adding to evidence of potential "overadherence" with oral cancer medications, a prospective study showed. The increased availability of oral chemotherapeutic or targeted drugs has increased the necessity for patient adherence to the prescribed regimen. A recent review documented problems with medication adherence among cancer patients. The study showed that underadherence — taking less medication than prescribed — occurred in 20 percent to 80 percent of cases. Overadherence has been observed in several studies, but investigators performed little or no statistical analysis to characterize the issue, the authors said.
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In a surprise finding, gene mutation found linked to low-risk bladder cancer
Science Codex
An international research team led by scientists from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center has discovered a genetic mutation linked to low-risk bladder cancer. Their findings are reported online in Nature Genetics. The investigators identified STAG2 as one of the most commonly mutated genes in bladder cancer, particularly in tumors that do not spread. The finding suggests that checking the status of the gene may help identify patients who might do unusually well following cancer treatment, says the study's senior investigator, cancer geneticist Todd Waldman, MD, PhD, a professor of oncology at Georgetown Lombardi.
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Common food additive may prevent peripheral neuropathy from chemotherapy
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Working with cells in test tubes and in mice, researchers discovered that a chemical commonly used as a dog food preservative prevents chemotherapy-associated peripheral neuropathy. Four of every five patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy with paclitaxel experience the painful condition. Ethoxyquin is an antioxidant that is approved by the FDA as a preservative. Experiments found that it binds certain cell proteins in a way that limits their exposure to the damaging effects of paclitaxel. The research was published in Annals of Neurology.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword NEUROPATHY.


NAPBC education event — Lead Your Breast Program to Excellence
ACS
Plan today to attend the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) Lead Your Breast Program to Excellence Conference. This dynamic, two-day conference will include expert faculty who developed the standards. Hear how you can build quality programs into your multidisciplinary breast center by utilizing nationally recognized standards as your foundation. This two-day conference will be held Nov. 15–16 in Chicago. Last year’s program was sold out; don’t delay, registration is already filling up. Register TODAY!
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Red wine, grape skin compound could treat cancers
Medical News Today
Researchers at the University of Missouri (UM) School of Medicine found the compound made melanoma cells more susceptible to radiation treatment. The findings follow earlier similar findings from UM that showed resveratrol sensitizes prostate cancer cells to treatment. The researchers now want to find a way to use the compound to treat a variety of cancers. One of the challenges is finding a means to deliver the compound into tumors.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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