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Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer
University of California San Francisco
An international research collaboration led by UC San Francisco researchers has identified a genetic variant common in Latina women that protects against breast cancer. The variant, a difference in just one of the 3 billion “letters” in the human genome known as a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), originates from indigenous Americans and confers significant protection from breast cancer, particularly the more aggressive estrogen receptor-negative forms of the disease, which generally have a worse prognosis.
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Individual genetic testing did not improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening
The Oncology Report
Counseling adults about their individual risk of colorectal cancer generally did not convince them to seek screening for the disease, according to a randomized controlled trial reported online Oct. 20 in Annals of Internal Medicine. “We did see a consistent increase over time in knowledge about CRC [colorectal cancer] screening and the role of genetic risk, suggesting that the educational component of the intervention was successful,” said Dr. David S. Weinberg of the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, Pa., and his associates.
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Patients who have left breast tumors have comparable OS to those with right breast tumors
Medical Xpress
Tumor laterality (left-side vs. right-side) does not impact overall survival in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).
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Diet may influence ovarian cancer survival
Reuters
Women with healthier diets before an ovarian cancer diagnosis are less likely to die in the years following the cancer than women with poorer diets, according to a new study. The exceptions were women with diabetes or a high waist circumference, which is often linked to diabetes. A healthy diet before diagnosis may indicate a stronger immune system and, indirectly, the capacity to respond favorably to cancer therapy, said lead author Cynthia A. Thomson of Health Promotion Sciences at the Canyon Ranch Center for Prevention and Health Promotion at the University of Arizona in Tucson.
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Simple test may predict wound complications after soft tissue sarcoma surgery
Loyola Medicine
As many as 35 percent of patients who undergo surgery to remove soft tissue sarcomas experience wound-healing complications due to radiation they receive before surgery. Now a study suggests that a simple test called transcutaneous oximetry may be able to predict which of these patients are most likely to experience wound-healing complications, potentially enabling surgeons to take extra precautions.
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Two experts discuss mammography issues on The Recovery Room Show
NAPBC
The Recovery Room Show recently launched a new episode discussing the benefits and controversies surrounding mammographic screening. In the episode, host Frederick L. Greene, MD, FACS, a surgical oncologist from Charlotte, N.C., and a member of the Commission on Cancer since 2000, talks with two leading experts in the field. The show includes a discussion on common concerns with mammography, the role of insurance companies, MRIs, and a high-profile recent Canadian study that cast doubt on the abilities of the screening tool.
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Chronic kidney disease associated with increased risk of renal and urothelial cancers
OncLive
Does renal disease increase one’s risk of developing cancer? We know there is a well-studied association between end-stage renal disease and cancer risk, but whether or not less severe forms of kidney disease place patients at an increased risk for various cancers is uncertain. A recent study from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah, Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) has shed some new light on this question.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Health plans' success mixed in managing cancer care programs (Managed Care)
Lung cancer genes reveal risks of even short-term smoking (Healthline)
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy to relieve post-radiation therapy effects (Radiation Therapy News)
Prostate cancer recurrence risk tied to lipid levels (The New York Times)
Rare cancer recoveries could be key to wider treatments (The Boston Globe)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Increase in PSA after prostate cancer surgery may not lead to metastasis in some men's lifetimes
Medical Xpress
Some prostate cancer patients whose prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels increase after a radical prostatectomy may die of causes unrelated to prostate cancer before they are diagnosed with a prostate cancer metastasis, and therefore treating them for recurrence may not be beneficial, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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High-dose radiotherapy doesn't offer survival benefit in mesothelioma
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Treating patients with high-dose radiotherapy after chemotherapy and surgical procedures for malignant pleural mesothelioma does not achieve improvements in local relapse and overall survival, according to data from a prospective randomized phase II trial presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.
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Important webinar — Caring for patients' spiritual needs: Resources for all providers
American Psychosocial Oncology Society
Plan now to join this webinar on Oct. 24, 2014, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm Eastern Time to participate in a program that will discuss the nature of religiosity/spirituality (R/S) in cancer care, strategies for initiating conversations about patients’ R/S, and strategies for effective collaboration with health care chaplains. The webinar is intended for providers in all disciplines with varying degrees of experience in caring for patients with spiritual needs. For detailed information, contact the American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS) Headquarters.
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The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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