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Better chemotherapy through targeted delivery
MIT News
Every year, about 100,000 Americans are diagnosed with brain tumors that have spread from elsewhere in the body. These tumors, known as metastases, are usually treated with surgery followed by chemotherapy, but the cancer often returns. A new study from MIT, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Johns Hopkins University suggests that delivering chemotherapy directly into the brain cavity may offer a better way to treat tumors that have metastasized to the brain.
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For nonadherent patients, individualized testing does not increase colorectal cancer screening rates
Oncology Nurse Advisor
According to a study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers have found that patients who know their individual risk for colorectal cancer is not sufficient to convince previously nonadherent patients to be screened for the disease. For the study, the researchers identified 783 participants at average risk for colorectal cancer who had not been adherent to screening at the time of entering the study. Participants were randomized to receive either usual care or individualized genetic and environmental risk assessment (GERA) of colorectal cancer susceptibility.
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Annual NCDB Call for Data
Commission on Cancer
The Commission on Cancer (CoC) is committed to assisting accredited cancer programs with maintaining the highest level of data quality possible. We appreciate your facility's participation and contribution to the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Data submissions are essential for assessing and improving the quality of cancer patient care. The information generated from the NCDB enables cancer programs to compare treatment and outcomes with regional, state, and national patterns. This year, the Annual NCDB Call for Data submissions are scheduled during January 2015 and corrections are due by April 1, 2015. A general overview is provided — Please see https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/cancer/ncdb/datasub/registrar for specific details.
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Trial participation low in lung and colorectal cancers
Clinical Oncology
Only about 25 percent of patients receiving chemotherapy for advanced lung or colorectal cancer participate in a discussion about the option of entering a clinical trial, according to a survey of a large sample of patients. Of those who have that discussion, less than 30 percent enroll. According to data, the vast majority of patients depend on clinicians to hear about trials. Specifically, more than 90 percent of those who decided to participate in a clinical trial first heard of the opportunity from a healthcare provider.
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Implementing Survivor Care Plans in CoC-accredited Cancer Programs
Commission on Cancer/American Cancer Society
Join us for a free webinar on Nov. 11 from 1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST. Speakers from the Commission on Cancer, CoC-accredited Hospitals, and the American Cancer Society will discuss the recent clarifications to Standard 3.3 and share their perspectives on implementing survivor care plans within CoC-accredited cancer programs
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Professional WOW FACTOR: NCoBC 2015
When is WOW an appropriate professional accolade? WOW is most appropriate when referring to the planned post conference sessions on Sexuality and Survivorship for the 25th Annual Interdisciplinary Breast Center Conference in Las Vegas.
  • Sexuality line up
  • Survivorship line up
  • www.breastcare.org
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    Immunotherapy added to radiotherapy may help overcome resistance to treatments
    Oncology Nurse Advisor
    Treating cancers with immunotherapy and radiotherapy at the same time could stop them from becoming resistant to treatment, according to a new study. Combining the two modalities helped the immune system hunt down and destroy cancer cells that were not killed by the initial radiotherapy in mice with breast, skin, and bowel cancers. The approach was found to improve survival and protect the mice against the return of the disease.
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    Pursuing Excellence through NAPBC Accreditation: Register now
    NAPBC
    Whether you are preparing for a re-accreditation survey, first survey, or looking for information on the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), this education program gives you the information you need. Avoid the fee increase; register today.

    Pursuing Excellence through NAPBC Accreditation is the only education program developed and taught by NAPBC staff, board members, and surveyors. This program prepares your breast center for survey and helps staff not familiar with the NAPBC standards understand their role in the accreditation process.


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    Radiation therapy for childhood cancer may up breast cancer risk
    Cancer Network
    Children treated for Wilms tumor, a rare kidney cancer, with chest radiation may be at a higher risk for developing breast cancer in adulthood. A study of 2,492 young women who were diagnosed with Wilms tumor and followed from age 15 showed that over 20 percent developed breast cancer by age 40. Compared with a 0.3 percent cumulative risk among Wilms tumor survivors who received no radiation therapy, those who had chest radiation had a 14.8 percent risk. The results of this study were published in Cancer.
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    Study analyzes aggressive treatment in stage IV lung cancer patients
    Radiation Therapy News
    Clinical results from a study titled “An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of Outcomes and Prognostic Factors after Treatment of Oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer,” were presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 56th Annual Meeting. This study analyzed a large, international cohort of patients diagnosed with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and showed that overall survival (OS) rates in these subjects can be linked to the time when metastases develop, along with lymph node involvement. Furthermore, aggressive treatment for patients at low-risk can lead to a five-year OS rate of 47.8 percent.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer (University of California San Francisco)
    Patients who have left breast tumors have comparable OS to those with right breast tumors (Medical Xpress)
    Individual genetic testing did not improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening (The Oncology Report)
    Diet may influence ovarian cancer survival (Reuters)
    Increase in PSA after prostate cancer surgery may not lead to metastasis in some men's lifetimes (Medical Xpress)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Postsurgical surveillance sufficient for stage I nonseminoma germ cell cancer
    HemOnc Today
    Most men with stage I nonseminoma germ cell cancer who undergo radical orchiectomy can be followed with surveillance, according to results of a retrospective study conducted in Denmark. “Danish national data show that approximately 70 percent of patients with germ cell cancer have clinical stage I disease at presentation. Of these, 40 percent have nonseminoma [germ cell cancer],” the researchers wrote. “Without treatment, a significant proportion of patients with stage I disease will relapse. These relapses can be treated when they appear, or adjuvant therapies can be applied immediately after orchiectomy.”
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    Using tiny particles to fight big diseases
    Medical Xpress
    Physicians will tell you: They are not winning the war on ovarian cancer. But FIU researchers are crafting a new weapon for that battle. A group of scientists have combined medicine and advanced nanotechnological engineering to create a smarter, more targeted therapy that could overcome the most lethal gynecologic cancer.
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    Two experts discuss mammography issues on The Recovery Room Show
    NAPBC
    The Recovery Room Show recently launched a new episode discussing the benefits and controversies surrounding mammographic screening. In the episode, host Frederick L. Greene, MD, FACS, a surgical oncologist from Charlotte, N.C., and a member of the Commission on Cancer since 2000, talks with two leading experts in the field. The show includes a discussion on common concerns with mammography, the role of insurance companies, MRIs, and a high-profile recent Canadian study that cast doubt on the abilities of the screening tool.
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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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