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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Oct. 30, 2013


 



Do doctors skirt risks of routine cancer screening?
MedPage Today
Results of a small online survey suggested that physicians may not be conveying the risks of overdiagnosis or overtreatment when recommending routine cancer screening for patients. A total of 91.5 percent of 317 men and women who took part in an online poll said they were not counseled by their physician regarding the potential harm associated with routine cancer screening, according to Odette Wegwarth, PhD, and Gerd Gigerenzer, PhD, of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin.
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Red and processsed meat 'increases colorectal cancer risk'
Medical News Today
A study presented at the annual American Society of Human Genetics 2013 meeting found people with a common genetic variant who consume red or processed meat may increase their risk of colorectal cancer. Furthermore, the U.S. researchers say they also found another specific genetic variant that suggests eating more fruit, vegetables, and fiber may lower the risk of colorectal cancer.
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Researchers spar over tests for breast cancer risks
Science
A heated discussion broke out at the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics over a hot-button topic: When will we know enough about rare cancer risk genes to begin routinely testing for them in patients with a family history of cancer? On one side of the debate was a team led by breast cancer geneticist Mary-Claire King, who discovered the first inherited breast cancer risk gene, BRCA1. King’s group now wants to routinely test certain women for other cancer-linked genes. Other researchers, however, argued that it is premature to test for these other genes, which are less well understood.
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New white paper addresses the impact of the ACA on cancer care
A new, in-depth publication entitled How Health Reform Is Transforming U.S. Healthcare: Implications for Cancer Care examines the key provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) that impact cancer care. From the Physician Quality Reporting System’s aim to boost quality measures reporting to the potential for accountable care organizations to transform care delivery, this paper sheds light on these and other key ACA provisions impacting cancer care.
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Health literacy: A missing piece of the puzzle in cancer care
Oncology Nurse Advisor
With a transformation of the health care landscape underway and the focus shifting to quality care and improved outcomes, considering the whole complex patient rather than simply addressing the disease or symptoms is imperative. Limited time for interaction between clinicians and patients and wide availability of information and resources allow patients to play a more active role in their care. Not only are they making more informed treatment decisions, but patients are also making decisions about their overall health care and well-being and managing their disease's effects and emotional impact on daily life.
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Can integrative oncology extend life in advanced disease?
Medscape
Integrative oncology might be helping to extend the lives of patients with advanced cancer, new research indicates. Although the outcomes from data are far from conclusive, they are nevertheless interesting and promising. However, controlled studies are needed. Integrative oncology is an emerging field that looks at the whole patient — body, mind, and spirit. It incorporates evidence-based mainstream oncology practices (such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation) with therapies considered to be complementary (such as nutrition, naturopathic, yoga, meditation).
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Lung cancer: Early palliative care can lead to improvements in quality of life, mood
WGHP-TV
Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, according to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, among patients with advanced-stage lung cancer early palliative care led to significant improvements in both quality of life and mood. As compared with patients receiving standard care, patients receiving early palliative care also underwent less aggressive care at the end of life and had longer survival rates. Palliative care is a medical subspecialty that focuses on providing care for individuals with life-limiting illnesses.
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Tricyclic antidepressants may be effective against an aggresive lung cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A little-used class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating a particularly deadly form of lung cancer, according to a new study. Because the drugs are already FDA-approved for use in humans, the researchers were able to quickly launch a clinical trial to test their theory in patients. The phase II trial is now recruiting participants with small-cell lung cancer and other similar conditions such as aggressive gastrointestinal neuroendocrine cancers.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword LUNG CANCER.


Prostate cancer radiation therapy rises as doctors profit
Bloomber
Urologists who buy their own equipment to provide expensive radiation treatment are more likely to use it to treat prostate cancer even when the benefit for patients is unclear, research shows. Prostate cancer is the most common tumor diagnosed in the U.S., where an estimated 238,590 men were told they had the disease this year. While only about 12 percent, or 29,270 men, will die from it this year, all will have to decide how, and whether, they want to treat the cancer.
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NAPBC education event — Lead Your Breast Program to Excellence
ACS
Plan today to attend the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) Lead Your Breast Program to Excellence Conference. This dynamic, two-day conference will include expert faculty who developed the standards. Hear how you can build quality programs into your multidisciplinary breast center by utilizing nationally recognized standards as your foundation. This two-day conference will be held Nov. 15–16 in Chicago. Last year’s program was sold out; don’t delay, registration is already filling up. Register TODAY!
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Recurrence of thyroid cancer 'could be predicted' with microRNAs
Medical News Today
New research has found that measuring sections of genetic material within papillary thyroid cancer tumors could predict the chance of recurrence following surgery, according to a study published in the journal Cancer. Researchers from Australia say they also discovered that elevated blood levels of this genetic material, known as microRNAs, could also indicate an increased chance of recurrence after thyroidectomy — the surgical removal of all or part of the thyroid gland.
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The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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