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Cost of treating skin cancer is skyrocketing
Consumer Affairs
Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States and has become a growing public health problem in the past few years. Not only is the number of skin cancer cases growing, the cost of treating the disease is surging. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now says skin cancer treatment costs increased five times faster than treatments for other cancers between 2002 and 2011. The average annual cost of skin cancer treatment was $3.6 billion during 2002-2006. That number grew to $8.1 billion in the years 2007 through 2011, an increase of 126 percent.
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Triclosan, a common antimicrobial in personal hygiene products, causes liver fibrosis and cancer in mice
Medical Xpress
Triclosan is an antimicrobial commonly found in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes, and many other household items. Despite its widespread use, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report potentially serious consequences of long-term exposure to the chemical. The study, published Nov. 17 by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that triclosan causes liver fibrosis and cancer in laboratory mice through molecular mechanisms that are also relevant in humans.
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    Clinical focus in renal cell carcinoma: Clues from gene studies
    MedPageToday
    Recent advances in the genetics of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have pointed the way to better characterization of tumors and to therapeutic strategies that could substantially improve outcomes, according to a researcher in the field. In contrast to certain other malignancies, RCC has proven stubborn about giving up its genetic mysteries. Consequently, conventional therapeutic strategies had an underlying presumption that all tumors were alike. That viewpoint has since been discounted.
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    Two experts discuss mammography issues on The Recovery Room Show
    NAPBC
    The Recovery Room Show recently launched a new episode discussing the benefits and controversies surrounding mammographic screening. In the episode, host Frederick L. Greene, MD, FACS, a surgical oncologist from Charlotte, N.C., and a member of the Commission on Cancer since 2000, talks with two leading experts in the field. The show includes a discussion on common concerns with mammography, the role of insurance companies, MRIs, and a high-profile recent Canadian study that cast doubt on the abilities of the screening tool.
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    Cannabis can help cure brain cancer, research finds
    UPI
    New research shows cannabis extracts containing tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol can help cure brain cancer when used in combination with radio therapy. Specialists at St George's, University of London tested mice with brain tumors using irradiation, no treatment, just cannabis extracts, and irradiation and cannabis extracts together. They found irradiation and cannabis extracts used in combination to be the most effective.
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    Cancer researchers identify gene mutations and process for how kidney tumors develop
    Health Canal
    Using next generation gene sequencing techniques, cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified more than 3,000 new mutations involved in certain kidney cancers, findings that help explain the diversity of cancer behaviors.
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    Anti-leukemia drug may also work against ovarian cancer
    Medical Xpress
    An antibody therapy already in clinical trials to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia may also prove effective against ovarian cancer — and likely other cancers as well — report researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in a study published in the Nov. 17 online early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The findings extend the anti-cancer potential of an experimental monoclonal antibody called cirmtuzumab, developed at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center by Thomas Kipps, MD, PhD, and colleagues.
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    Scientists uncover vast numbers of DNA 'blind spots' that may hide cancer-causing mistakes
    Cancer Research UK
    Cancer Research UK scientists have found more than 400 "blind spots" in DNA that could hide cancer-causing gene faults, according to research published recently in Cancer Research. The researchers found hidden faults in areas that are tricky for gene-reading technology to decode. This technique, which unravels cancer's genetic blueprint, is an important part of the research that scientists carry out to understand more about cancer's biology.
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    Genetic-based NanoFlare technology can detect live cancer cells in the bloodstream
    AZoNano
    Metastasis is bad news for cancer patients. Northwestern University scientists now have demonstrated a simple but powerful tool that can detect live cancer cells in the bloodstream, potentially long before the cells could settle somewhere in the body and form a dangerous tumor.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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