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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Nov. 20, 2013


 



No advantage with asymptomatic screening for ovarian cancer
Clinical Oncology
Screening of asymptomatic women for ovarian cancer may cause more harm than good. A recent study determined that screening results in unnecessary surgery and that no advantage to early diagnosis was found. Substantial patient anxiety is associated with false-positive screening results, the authors noted. Clinical practice guidelines recommend against screening women at average risk for ovarian cancer, yet surveys of primary care physicians indicate up to 24 percent routinely offer testing to asymptomatic women. Indeed, a U.S. survey found that 97 percent of women want to be screened for ovarian cancer.
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Early pancreatic cancer may be caught by a simple blood test
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A small preliminary study suggests that a simple blood test based on detection of tiny epigenetic alterations may reveal the earliest signs of pancreatic cancer. The disease is nearly always fatal because it is not usually discovered until it has spread to other parts of the body. These research findings, if confirmed, could be an important step in reducing mortality from the cancer, which has an overall five-year survival rate of less than 5 percent and has seen few improvements in survival over the last three decades.
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What does cancer smell like?
The New York Times
On a lab bench in Philadelphia sits a tiny box lined with nearly invisible nanotubes and gold. A clear plastic pipe runs through it, and a thicket of pins, each sprouting a red or blue wire, protrudes from its end. As air from the pipe wafts over the nanotubes, electrical signals surge out of the box along the wire threads. The whole apparatus is situated near a vial of blood, “sniffing” the air above it through the pipe.
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Cancer screening practices may miss patients at high risk
Healio
Primary care physicians’ cancer screening practices vary significantly and may not sufficiently target patients at increased risk for cancer, according to study results. Researchers used the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to evaluate cancer screening practices of non-federally employed office-based physicians from 2005 to 2010. The investigators evaluated practices for mammography and breast examinations in women older than 40 years, pelvic examinations and Pap smears in women aged 18 to 70 years, and digital rectal examinations and PSA testing for men aged 50 to 75 years.
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Botox to treat prostate cancer?
BioNews-TX
Once thought of as only an anti-aging cosmetic treatment for wrinkles, fine lines, and facial indentations, Botox injections can now also be used for the management of early prostate cancers. According to the latest clinical trial conducted by the University of Texas Health Science Center, the freezing properties of Botox can be employed in controlling the tumor growth and spread in adult males who have the localized disease (confined to the gland).
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Merck trial shows more melanoma cancer patients respond to drug
Reuters
Early data from a small trial of Merck & Co. Inc's experimental immunotherapy cancer drug, known as MK-3475, show that about half of advanced melanoma patients treated with the highest dose of the drug experienced tumor shrinkage. Updated results from the early-stage trial are set to be presented on Nov. 18 at the International Congress of the Society for Melanoma Research in Philadelphia.
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NIH study finds low-intensity therapy for Burkitt lymphoma is highly effective
National Institutes of Health
Adult patients with a type of cancer known as Burkitt lymphoma had excellent long-term survival rates — upwards of 90 percent — following treatment with low-intensity chemotherapy regimens, according to a new clinical trial finding. Standard treatment for Burkitt lymphoma involves high-dose chemotherapy, which has a high rate of toxicity, including death, and cures only 60 percent of adult patients. This trial was conducted by researchers at the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, and appeared Nov. 14, 2013, in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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National Cancer Data Base Call for Data
CoC Source
The official NCDB Call for Data announcement was sent to all programs in a special CoC Source on Oct. 15. The submission edits for the upcoming Call for Data will be posted at the beginning of December. Do not select cases for NCDB submission until at least Dec. 1, to avoid missing any cases. In the meantime, pre-edit using the NAACCR edit set for "Hospitals - All," which should be available in your software (you may have to ask your software provider what it is called there.) That is the same edit set that must be used in order to stamp your cases "Date Case Complete - CoC" and is the source for most NCDB submission edits.
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Combination therapy could lead to reduction in prostate cancer recurrence
Medical Xpress
Prostate cancer patients who receive radiotherapy could soon be treated more effectively, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer. Although radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the disease, about a third of patients go on to experience a recurrence of their cancer. Scientists funded by Yorkshire Cancer Research at the University of York have identified a population of radiation-resistant prostate cancer cells, and by combining low doses of a common cancer drug with radiotherapy treatment they have increased the sensitivity of these cells to radiation. The findings could lead to a reduction in recurrences.
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Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
Commission on Cancer
Are you a new staff member just learning the ropes of CoC accreditation?
Is your cancer program considering CoC accreditation and you want to learn about the CoC Standards?
Do you need a basic refresher on the CoC accreditation process and standards?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then plan to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Austin, Texas, on Feb. 28, 2014. This is the only program developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff who review the CoC Standards, provide practical information on how to achieve compliance, and discuss the important role you and your cancer team play throughout the continuum of cancer care. Get the information you need from the people involved in standard development and the survey process. For additional information, go to www.facs.org/cancer.

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Postmastectomy pain most troubling for breast cancer survivors
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Persistent postmastectomy pain is rated by survivors as the most troubling symptom by women with breast cancer who undergo surgery. Surgery is part of the treatment for breast cancer for more than 40 percent of 200,000 U.S. women with breast cancer every year. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh evaluated 611 women who had undergone total or partial mastectomy and were treated with chemotherapy, radiation, and/or hormone therapy. Their objective was to determine which factors—demographics, tumor size, pain severity, treatments, stress, and psychological factors—contribute to postmastectomy pain. Their study was published in The Journal of Pain.
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Chemotherapy offered limited benefit for advanced chondrosarcomas
Healio
Conventional chemotherapy demonstrated limited efficacy in patients with advanced chondrosarcomas, with the highest benefit found in mesenchymal and dedifferentiated subtypes, according to study results. Limited data exist with regard to the effects of chemotherapy in patients with advanced chondrosarcomas, researchers said.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CHEMOTHERAPY.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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