This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit December 03, 2014


 

Advertisement

Breast cancer vaccine shows promise in slowing progress
TIME
An initial safety trial of a breast cancer vaccine has proven safe, with preliminary results suggesting the vaccine will slow cancer progression. The vaccine, which is being developed by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is meant for patients with breast cancers that express a protein found only in breast tissue called mammaglobin-A.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Advertisement


American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical expert statement on cancer survivorship care planning
Journal of Oncology Practice
The seminal report from the Institute of Medicine, "From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition," identified four essential components of survivorship care and recommended that a survivorship care plan (SCP), consisting of a treatment summary and follow-up care plan, be developed and used as a tool to deliver patient-centered care by enhancing communication between the oncology team and the patient as well as communication and coordination of care between the oncology team and the primary care provider (PCP).
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
SPONSORED CONTENT


Cervical cancer is preventable
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
More than 12,000 women get cervical cancer every year. Up to 93 percent of cervical cancers are preventable. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination helps prevent infection with the HPV types that cause most cervical cancers. The Papanicolaou test screens for abnormal cells that may develop into cancer, and the HPV test screens for the HPV virus that causes these cell changes. Even though screening works, 10 percent of women in the U.S. in 2012 reported they had not been screened in the last five years.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Showcase Your Breast Care Products and Services
Attention breast care industry vendors, Join 80+ industry leading companies exhibiting at the 25th Annual Interdisciplinary Breast Care Conference March 14-18th, 2015, at the Paris Las Vegas to showcase your products, equipment and services to over 900 breast care professionals.
  • 2015 Exhibitor Kit
  • 2014 Exhibitor List
  • www.breastcare.org
  •  


    Stressed-out cancers may provide drug target
    Medical Xpress
    Research at the University of Adelaide has discovered cancer cells may be particularly susceptible to metabolic stress — opening the way for new targeted therapy that won't harm normal cells. The researchers showed that chromosomal instability, which is a hallmark of rapidly dividing cancer cells, makes them stressed and vulnerable to mild metabolic disruption. Metabolism is the normal process by which the body turns food into energy.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Miss an issue of The CoC Brief? Click here to visit The CoC Brief archive page.


    Should the FDA force drug makers to discuss their clinical trials?
    Forbes
    When developing a new drug, biopharmaceutical companies design clinical trials that, if successful, will garner approval from the FDA and other regulatory agencies around the world. Late-stage clinical trials are time consuming and costly, with expenses running into tens, even hundreds of millions of dollars. Oftentimes, you get only one chance to run such a program, so it's important to get the design right. Thus, it behooves companies to meet with the FDA to discuss their protocols to get a sense of whether the FDA will approve the drug pending a successful outcome with regard to safety and efficacy.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Advertisement
    PRODUCT SHOWCASE
      Casefinding, Abstracting and Follow-up
    We provide accurate oncology data collection with a team of experienced and credentialed consultants. For the highest oncology data quality standards, work with the team at Care Communications, Inc.

    Learn more about Oncology Data Services.

    Download our white paper: “Making Sense of the Rapid Quality Reporting System.”
     


    Scientists discover why bowel cancer sometimes outsmarts treatment
    Cancer Research UK
    A new study that challenges the prevailing view of how bowel cancer develops in the large intestine is published in Nature Medicine. Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered that bowel cancer may not be restricted to starting its journey in the stem cells in the lining of the intestines as previously thought. The researchers, based at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, studied a hereditary faulty gene that can cause bowel cancer in middle age. The faulty gene causes normal cells to behave like immortal stem cells and develop tumors of their own — challenging the theory that normal cells have a fixed fate and limited lifespan.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    University of Chicago targets vast cancer data, will 'democratize' research
    Chicago Tribune
    With a new system to compile and help navigate mountains of cancer data, University of Chicago health experts are aiming to bring the future of medicine a little closer. The Genomic Data Commons project will help researchers around the country assess genetic information from more than 10,000 cancer patients. The data could be used to develop more effective treatments, said Robert Grossman, a professor of medicine at the university who is directing the project.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Tim Duncan donates $247,000 to cancer research project
    USA Today
    San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan has made more than 200 million dollars in salary over the course of his 17-year NBA career, and he's using some of that money to give back to the community and support a local cancer research project. Duncan donated $247,000 to the San Antonio 1000 Cancer Genome Project.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Researchers recreate stem cells from deceased patients to study present-day illnesses
    Medical Xpress
    Research scientists have developed a novel method to recreate brain and intestinal stem cells from patients who died decades ago using DNA from stored blood samples to study the potential causes of debilitating illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease. The lab research, published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, could yield new therapies for people who suffer from aggressive motor-neuron and gut-related conditions that proved fatal to the deceased patients who long ago volunteered their blood samples.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Prostate cancer bone metastases blocked with HIV drug in mice
    Prostate Cancer News Today
    Lethal bone metastases derived from prostate cancer may be readily prevented with a drug approved to treat HIV, according to new research from the laboratory of Richard Pestell, MD, PhD, MBA, at Thomas Jefferson University. The team found prostate cancer and HIV share a common receptor known as CCR5 and that blocking CCR5 reduces prostate cancer metastases in mouse models of disease.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Cancer immunotherapy toxic to obese rats
    Bioscience Technology
    Immunotherapy that can be effective against tumors in young, thin mice can be lethal to obese ones, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found. The findings, published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggest a possible link between body fat and the risk of toxicity from some types of immunotherapy.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Scientists unveil powerful method to speed cancer drug discovery (Lab Manager)
    Breast removal rates increasing for early cancers in U.S. (Reuters Health)
    Hookah smoke increases benzene exposure, risk for leukemia (Medical News Today)
    'Huge breakthrough' in understanding how the immune system recognizes cancer (Cancer Research UK)
    Researchers identify new ways to drain cancer's 'fuel tank' (Medical Xpress)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     
    Advertisement



    The CoC Brief

    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
    Download media kit

    Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
    Contribute news

    Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


    Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

    This edition of The CoC Brief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

    Recent issues

    Nov. 26, 2014
    Nov. 19, 2014
    Nov. 12, 2014
    Oct. 29, 2014






    7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063