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Extent of surgery requires individualization in medullary thyroid cancer
Healio
New data indicate that survival after total thyroidectomy with central lymph node dissection in patients with medullary thyroid cancer was largely dependent on tumor size and distant metastases. Guidelines advocate a more conservative approach to surgery in patients with medullary thyroid cancer, but whether approach this improves survival remains unclear, researchers wrote in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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TCGA data allow better predictions for colorectal cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) began as a pilot study in 2006 to characterize brain tumors and ovarian cancer. It generated unprecedented amounts of data of unequaled quality, and in 2009, TCGA announced plans to produce comprehensive genomic maps of at least 20 types of cancer over the next five years. In a second installment, Oncology Nurse Advisor reviews the genomic findings related to colorectal cancer and the potential impact on new therapies.
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AJCC-NCRA Education Needs Assessment Survey
AJCC
Beginning with cases diagnosed Jan. 1, 2016, and after, the standard-setters in the U.S. and Canada will require AJCC TNM and Summary Stage coding to be recorded in the cancer registry abstract. Collaborative Stage will no longer be used. To assure the cancer surveillance community is prepared for this change, the AJCC has asked NCRA to prepare an Education Needs Assessment. The goal of the assessment is to identify gaps in knowledge and skills in order to determine the training and education needed to prepare for the 2016 shift in staging process.

Your help is needed to assure that your education/training needs are understood and can be met! Please complete this survey to help and in the process earn 1 complimentary CE credit.

The survey will take 45-60 minutes and needs to be completed in one sitting. Once you finish and submit the survey, NCRA will follow up with details on how to obtain your CE completion certificate.

There are two surveys, and you should take the one that best relates to your primary work. If your primary work is in, or for, a Hospital Registry, http://www.sogosurvey.com/k/RQsQTYPPsVsPsPsP. If your primary work is in, or for, a Central, Regional, Provincial, or Federal Registry, http://www.sogosurvey.com/k/RQsQTYPPsUsPsPsP. These surveys will close on Dec. 10. Thank you for your help!

Questions? E-mail cirvin@ncra-usa.org

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New biomarkers improve prostate cancer diagnostics
Medical Xpress
New biomarkers will improve diagnostics of endemic diseases in future, such as prostate cancer. Their mission: to recognize the tumor earlier and classify it more precisely — thereby helping avoid unnecessary operations. Does the patient have cancer of the prostate gland, commonly called prostate cancer? A question like this is difficult for physicians to answer. Up to now, they have been dependent on clues provided by the prostatespecific antigen PSA. If the prostate gland is attacked by cancer, it releases more of this protein into the bloodstream. However, this test has a weakness: it is very imprecise.
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Study: Fish oil fights prostate cancer
Digital Journal
A new study shows that supplementing a low fat diet with fish oil can help fight prostate cancer. Eating lots of fish also produced a 63 percent reduction in prostate cancer-specific mortality. Several lines of evidence point to beneficial effects of fish and fish oil supplements against prostate cancer. A new study was recently conducted by William Aronson of the UCLA Department of Urology and his colleagues and shows that supplementing a low fat diet with five grams of fish oil per day can reduce proinflammatory compounds that are associated with cancer.
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National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Call for Data
CoC Source
The official NCDB Call for Data announcement was sent to all programs in a special CoC Source on Oct. 15. The submission edits for the upcoming Call for Data will be posted at the beginning of December. Do not select cases for NCDB submission until at least Dec. 1 to avoid missing any cases. In the meantime, pre edit using the NAACCR edit set for "Hospitals - All," which should be available in your software (you may have to ask your software provider what it is called there). That is the same edit set that must be used in order to stamp your cases "Date Case Complete - CoC" and is the source for most NCDB submission edits.
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PCa raises melanoma risk
Renal & Urology News
Men with a history of prostate cancer (PCa) are at increased risk of melanoma, a new study suggests. Researchers came to that conclusion based on a study of 42,372 men in the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study (HPFS) and 18,603 men in the Physicians' Health Study (PHS). A history of PCa was associated with an 83 percent increased risk of melanoma in the HPFS, a 2.2-fold increased risk in the PHS, and an 89 percent increased risk when the results of the two cohorts were combined.
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Afatinib superior to chemotherapy for EGFR-mutated NSCLC
The Oncology Report
The oral EGFR blocker afatinib was superior to standard chemotherapy at prolonging progression-free survival in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancers that harbor EGFR mutations, according to a report in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Patients who received afatinib in this international, industry-sponsored phase-III clinical trial also showed statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in lung cancer symptoms and a higher treatment response rate than did those who received a regimen of cisplatin plus pemetrexed, which is widely considered to be the optimal combination chemotherapy, said Dr. Lecia V. Sequist of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, and her associates.
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U.S. doctors overusing Pap tests
Health 24
Doctors in the United States overuse Pap tests for cervical cancer screening in some groups of women, according to a new study. Researchers found that women who have had their sex organs removed and others considered too old to worry about cervical cancer are among those getting tested. "Almost two-thirds of women who have had hysterectomies reported having recent Pap tests," study co-author Deanna Kepka, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Utah, said in a university news release.
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Why do tumors become resistant to chemotherapy?
Science Codex
A common observation in oncology is the phenomenon that a patient with a tumor receives a drug and responds very well, but after a few months the cancer comes back and is now resistant to previously administered chemotherapy. What happened? Many mechanisms contribute to explain this effect called "acquired resistance," but Manel Esteller, director of epigenetics and cancer biology at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), ICREA researcher, and professor of genetics at the University of Barcelona, describes in The Journal of The National Cancer Institute the existence of epigenetic differences that explain the lack of response of the tumor recurs.
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USPSTF: Evidence lacking for primary care oral CA screening
Health Day News via The Clinical Advisor
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has found there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend screening asymptomatic adults for oral cancer in primary care settings. Virginia A. Moyer, MD, MPH, on behalf of the USPSTF, and colleagues updated the 2004 recommendation on screening for oral cancer. To examine whether screening for oral cancer reduced morbidity or mortality, the researchers conducted a comprehensive evidence review. In addition, the accuracy of the oral screening examination for identifying oral cancer or potentially malignant disorders with high likelihood of progression to oral cancer was assessed.
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Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
Commission on Cancer
Are you a new staff member just learning the ropes of CoC accreditation?
Is your cancer program considering CoC accreditation and you want to learn about the CoC standards?
Do you need a basic refresher on the CoC accreditation process and standards?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then plan to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Austin, Texas, on Feb. 28, 2014. This is the only program developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff who review the CoC Standards, provide practical information on how to achieve compliance, and discuss the important role you and your cancer team play throughout the continuum of cancer care. Get the information you need from the people involved in standard development and the survey process. For additional information, go to http://www.facs.org/cancer/schedules/accred101.html .

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New family of proteins linked to major role in cancer
Medical Xpress
Scientists have described a new family of proteins that appear to play a key role in cancer and might be targets for future cancer drugs. A major new study in the journal Nature sets out the structure of the new family, called glutamate intramembrane proteases — the founding member of which plays a critical role in transforming healthy cells into cancer cells. The research, funded by Cancer Research U.K. and conducted by scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, defined the structure of a protein called Rce1 and established it as the first known member of a whole new protein family.
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Male breast cancer treated with more masectomies
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Breast cancer is treated differently in men than in women, and men with breast cancer undergo mastectomy more often than women with the disease do. Although locally advanced female breast cancer is commonly treated with radiation, this new study found that radiation is used less in male disease. Researchers from the University of Colorado Cancer Center in Denver examined data from 4,276 cases of male breast cancer and 718,587 cases of female breast cancer. Their data came from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program database, which has collected cancer statistics since 1973 and includes tumor type, demographics, treatment, and outcome information for about 28 percent of the U.S. population.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword MASECTOMY.
 
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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