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Researcher reveals protein once thought to be expressed only in brain may cause certain thyroid cancers
Bio News Texas
Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have discovered that a protein once thought to be expressed in the brain only may play an important role in a deadly form of thyroid cancer and other cancers. This result may provide researchers with a new target to stop the progression of these cancers. Researchers found that over-activation of a certain protein in hormone-secreting cells helps fuel medullary thyroid cancer cells in mice as well as human cells. The over-active protein makes a potential target for inhibiting cancer cell growth.
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Obesity, smoking increase risk of serious complications after immediate breast reconstruction with implants
ACS
New research findings published in the December issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons confirm that factors such as smoking and obesity increase the odds of early implant loss in women who undergo mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction with implants. Additionally, the study authors propose a unique risk-scoring tool that allows surgeons to better counsel patients preoperatively about their predicted risk for complications.
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Half-match donor promising in acute leukemia
MedPage Today
A new strategy for hematopoietic stem cell transplants may offer hope to almost all children with acute leukemia, a researcher said here. The approach uses a so-called half-matched donor — usually either a child's mother or father — and offers efficacy comparable with transplant from fully matched donors, according to Alice Bertaina, MD, of Bambino Gesu Children's Hospital in Rome, Italy.
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Inflammation in prostate biopsies 'indicated reduced cancer risk'
Medical News Today
Researchers say that men who show signs of inflammation in their initial prostate biopsies may have a reduced risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer from future biopsies. This finding is according to a study published in the journal Cancer. Investigators from the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System in New Hyde Park, N.Y., led by Dr. Daniel Moreira, say their findings suggest that since inflammation has a "predictive value" it should be regularly reported from prostate biopsies.
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Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
Commission on Cancer
Are you a new staff member just learning the ropes of CoC accreditation?
Is your cancer program considering CoC accreditation and you want to learn about the CoC standards?
Do you need a basic refresher on the CoC accreditation process and standards?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then plan to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Austin, Texas, on Feb. 28, 2014. This is the only program developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff who review the CoC Standards, provide practical information on how to achieve compliance, and discuss the important role you and your cancer team play throughout the continuum of cancer care. Get the information you need from the people involved in standard development and the survey process. For additional information, go to http://www.facs.org/cancer/schedules/accred101.html .

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New blood test may aid in early detection of breast cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A new blood test for peptides cleaved by carboxypeptidase N may soon be available to help detect early stages of breast cancer. Carboxypeptidase N, an enzyme that modifies proteins to produce smaller peptides, is elevated in lung cancer. A new study in Clinical Chemistry showed that enzyme levels are also increased in breast cancer patients. Further, peptide levels in the blood accurately predicted the presence of early-stage breast cancer tissue in mice as well as a small population of human patients.
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Pennsylvania Cancer Centers' outcomes data are publicly released through new partnership between the ACoS Commission on Cancer and Pennsylvania Health Care Quality Alliance
ACS
The American College of Surgeons (ACoS) Commission on Cancer (CoC) has joined with the Pennsylvania Health Care Quality Alliance (PHCQA) to make cancer quality data from participating Pennsylvania hospitals available to the public. The initiative, which is the first of its kind in the U.S., will include data from 72 percent (52 programs) of all CoC-accredited cancer programs in Pennsylvania.
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National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Call for Data
CoC Source
The official NCDB Call for Data announcement was sent to all programs in a special CoC Source on Oct. 15. The submission edits for the upcoming Call for Data will be posted at the beginning of December. Do not select cases for NCDB submission until at least Dec. 1 to avoid missing any cases. In the meantime, pre edit using the NAACCR edit set for "Hospitals - All," which should be available in your software (you may have to ask your software provider what it is called at your facility). That is the same edit set that must be used in order to stamp your cases "Date Case Complete - CoC" and is the source for most NCDB submission edits.
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Surgery may benefit elderly women with endometrial cancer
The Oncology Report
Surgery is a safe option for elderly women who have endometrial cancer, and significantly extend life with a low rate of surgical complications, findings from a small study showed. A review of 68 women aged 75 to 94 years found that those who underwent surgery lived about two years longer than those who didn’t, Dr. Eloise Chapman-Davis reported at a meeting sponsored by the AAGL. The women in the current study were treated for endometrial cancer from 2005 to 2012. The first analysis broke down the cohort into those who had surgery (55) and those who did not.
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Killing cancer like the common cold
CNN
Nick Wilkins was diagnosed with leukemia when he was four years old, and when the cancer kept bouncing back, impervious to all the different treatments the doctors tried, his father sat him down for a talk. John Wilkins explained to Nick, who was by then 14, that doctors had tried chemotherapy, radiation, even a bone marrow transplant from his sister. "I explained to him that we're running out of options," Wilkins remembers telling his son. There was one possible treatment they could try: an experimental therapy at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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