This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Dec. 18, 2013


 



10 groups in ACOs report decline in cancer care spending
Vital Signs
Spending on cancer care declined among 10 physician groups in Medicare's early test of financial incentives akin to accountable care, according to a report in the journal Healthcare. The mortality rate for cancer patients declined among medical groups in the five-year effort, known as the Physician Group Practice Demonstration, and spending fell by an annual average of $721 per cancer patient. That number is compared with an average annual decline of $114 per patient for all patients in the demonstration, as reported last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Advertisement


Breast cancer patients often undergo unneeded scans at time of prognosis
Fierce Medical Imaging
More than one-third of younger, early-stage breast cancer patients undergo unnecessary imaging procedures at the time of prognosis and staging, according to research presented last week at the 2013 CTRC-San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. In a retrospective study of more than 40,000 women who had an initial diagnosis of breast cancer, researchers from MD Anderson Cancer Center found that 37 percent of early stage breast cancer patients had at least one claim for an unnecessary staging test, with minimal change in rate of that average over a five-year period.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advances in urology: Focus on prostate cancer
Medscape
Clinicians increasingly are recognizing that many of the men diagnosed by a screening test of their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level have a very low likelihood of developing progressive disease. For that reason, immediate local therapy in most cases appears to offer patients little benefit while subjecting them to the side effects of various therapies. Unfortunately, the use of external radiation is increasing, possibly a consequence of the financial incentives available to urologists who purchase their own radiation equipment, or because some radiation centers are now offering proton beam radiation under the promise of fewer side effects despite the absence of any data to support those claims.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
Commission on Cancer
Are you a new staff member just learning the ropes of CoC accreditation?
Is your cancer program considering CoC accreditation and you want to learn about the CoC standards?
Do you need a basic refresher on the CoC accreditation process and standards?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then plan to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Austin, Texas, on Feb. 28, 2014. This is the only program developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff who review the CoC Standards, provide practical information on how to achieve compliance, and discuss the important role you and your cancer team play throughout the continuum of cancer care. Get the information you need from the people involved in standard development and the survey process. For additional information, go to http://www.facs.org/cancer/schedules/accred101.html.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Offer for Readers of The CoC Brief — Practice Review
Are you concerned about diminishing reimbursements? Time to take action and give your practice a check up!
1) Take advantage of the complimentary Practice Analysis.
2) See how you can prepare for the Affordable care Act.
From production and reimbursement to coding and A/R, find out where you are and what you can do to take advantage of the changes in healthcare and to protect your practice.
 


A new gene target for fighting cancer
MIT Technology Review
About half of all cancer patients have a mutation in a gene called p53, which codes for a tumor-suppressing protein that controls cell division. That mutation allows tumors to continue growing even after chemotherapy damages their DNA. A new study from MIT biologists has found that tumor cells with mutated p53 can be made much more vulnerable to chemotherapy by blocking another gene, called MK2. In a study of mice, tumors lacking both p53 and MK2 shrank dramatically when treated with the drug Cisplatin, while tumors with functional MK2 kept growing.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Metformin's effect on differentiated thyroid cancer
Medscape
This retrospective clinical study compared responses to the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer in diabetic patients treated with Metformin, diabetic patients not treated with Metformin, and control nondiabetic patients. The objective was to determine whether patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who were treated with Metformin had better responses to their thyroid cancer treatment compared with diabetic thyroid cancer patients who were not treated with Metformin.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Call for Data
CoC Source
The official NCDB Call for Data announcement was sent to all programs in a special CoC Source on Oct. 15. The submission edits for the upcoming Call for Data will be posted at the beginning of December. Do not select cases for NCDB submission until at least Dec. 1 to avoid missing any cases. In the meantime, pre edit using the NAACCR edit set for "Hospitals - All," which should be available in your software (you may have to ask your software provider what it is called at your facility). That is the same edit set that must be used in order to stamp your cases "Date Case Complete - CoC" and is the source for most NCDB submission edits.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Protein in prostate biopsies signals increased risk of cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
The presence of a particular protein in biopsied prostate tissue substantially increases the likelihood that cancer will develop in that organ. This discovery is likely to help physicians decide how closely to monitor men who are potentially at risk for prostate cancer, which is one of the most confusing and controversial dilemmas in health care. These findings, from the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, are the first to quantify, in the setting of a clinical trial, the increased risk of prostate cancer development from the protein ERG. The trial was reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
Oncology OnTrack Supports Nurse Navigation
Oncology OnTrack is used to navigate patients with any cancer type from screening to diagnosis, treatment and survivorship, interfaces with other programs and supports accreditations.
Advertisement
Cancer Registry Impact

Ensure the highest quality oncology data reporting to help improve care and aid in decision making. Learn about Care Communications, Inc. Cancer Registry Services.


Study confirms fibroblast growth factor receptors as targets for pancreatic cancer treatment
Medical Xpress
Proteins called fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been implicated in the development of pancreatic cancer, which remains difficult to treat. Researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) have now confirmed that FGFRs can be used as treatment targets in preclinical studies and have identified certain molecular characteristics that could be useful in developing personalized treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer. Study results have been published online first in the British Journal of Cancer.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Few benefit from contralateral breast removal, model shows
General Surgery News
Of the thousands of women with early-stage breast cancer in one breast who opt to undergo a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy every year, less than one in 100 will derive any survival benefit from the procedure, a new computer model suggests. “We hope that by providing women with accurate and easily understood information about the potential benefits for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy [CPM], this may impact current trends,” said study co-author Pamela Portschy, MD, a surgical resident at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Allergies increase risk of blood cancers in women
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A team of scientists looking into the interplay of the immune system and cancer have found a link between having a history of airborne allergies — in particular to plants, grass, and trees — with risk of blood cancers in women. Notably, the study did not find the same association in men, which suggests a possible gender-specific role in chronic stimulation of the immune system that may lead to the development of hematologic cancers. The findings were published in the American Journal of Hematology.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BLOOD CANCER.
 
Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement



The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
Contribute news

Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of The CoC Brief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

Recent issues

Dec. 18, 2013
Dec. 11, 2013
Dec. 4, 2013
Nov. 27, 2013






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063