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As 2014 comes to a close, ACS would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the ACS CoC Brief a look at the 20 most accessed articles from the year. Here is part one. Enjoy!

Breast cancer treatment: A better way to check the lymph nodes
Consumer Health Choices
From April 16: Lymph nodes are small glands in the underarms and many other places in the body. If you have breast cancer, your doctor will usually check the underarm lymph nodes. Most breast cancer is invasive. This means that it can spread. The doctor checks the lymph nodes in the underarm to find out if the cancer has spread and to plan what treatment is needed after surgery.
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Recent findings published in Journal of Clinical Oncology support the Commission on Cancer's quality measure on use of needle biopsy to diagnose breast cancer
Commission on Cancer
From Sept. 10: There is a growing movement in oncology to measure quality of cancer care with the ultimate goal of increasing accountability and improving outcomes. As outlined in a recent Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, fundamental to this movement is the need to elucidate the role that physicians play in promoting or impeding quality. Yet even in breast cancer, one of the most commonly studied malignancies, the absence of national databases has been a key barrier preventing assessment of physician quality.
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Imaging techniques for the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma
AHRQ
From Nov. 5: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignant neoplasm of the liver, and accurate diagnosis and staging of HCC are important for guiding treatment and other clinical decisions. A number of imaging modalities are available for detection of HCC in surveillance and nonsurveillance settings, evaluation of focal liver lesions to identify HCC, and staging of HCC. The purpose of this review is to compare the effectiveness of imaging techniques for HCC on test performance, clinical decisionmaking, clinical outcomes, and harms.
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Dense breast tissue drives early stages of cancer, new study finds
Medical News Today
From Feb. 19: Scientists at the University of Manchester in the U.K. think that a key biological mechanism may explain for the first time why women with dense breast tissue have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. "We know that high breast density can greatly increase a woman's breast cancer risk as well as other factors such as aging, family history, and presence of mutations in genes such as BRCA 1 and BRCA 2," said University of Manchester professor Michael Lisanti.
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U.S. Cancer Statistics: 1999-2011 released
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
From Sept. 10: The U.S. Cancer Statistics: 1999-2011 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report (USCS) contains the official federal statistics on cancer incidence (newly diagnosed cases) from each registry that met data quality criteria. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute have combined their cancer incidence data sources to produce these statistics. Mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System of the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics are included for each state.
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Miss an issue of The CoC Brief? Click here to visit The CoC Brief archive page.
Registration now open for Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Chicago on February 27, 2015. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards can be used as a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer.


Low-dose CT lung cancer screening recommendations will up diagnoses
HealthDay News via HCP Live
From May 21: Implementation of the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening is expected to increase lung cancer diagnosis and increase Medicare expenditure. These findings have been released in advance of presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, to be held from May 30 to June 3 in Chicago, Ill.
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Patients' distress level a new focus of concern
The Inquirer
From Nov. 12: When the staff at Abington Memorial Hospital handed a breast cancer patient its new "Distress Thermometer" questionnaire, she instantly felt conflicted. How could she, an early-stage patient with a good prognosis, say how she was really feeling when she saw how much worse off others in the radiation treatment waiting room were? She left the questionnaire blank.
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Increased incidence of thyroid cancer due to increase in diagnoses
Oncology Nurse Advisor
From March 5: The increased incidence of thyroid cancer appears to be associated with an "epidemic of diagnosis" and not disease, according to a new study. An increase in thyroid cancer previously has been reported, largely due to the detection of small papillary cancers, a common and less aggressive form of the disease, according to the study background. Since 1975, the incidence of thyroid cancer has nearly tripled from 4.9 to 14.3 per 100,000 people, with virtually the entire increase due to papillary thyroid cancer (from 3.4 to 12.5 per 100,000 people).
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Five myths may compromise care of patients with brain metastases
Oncology Nurse Advisor
From July 16: A blue-ribbon team of national experts on brain cancer said that professional pessimism and out-of-date myths rather than current science may compromise the care of patients with cancer that has metastasized to the brain. Assumptions underlying key clinical trials in the past are now out-of-date, and some physicians have lumped together brain metastases without regard to the primary site of the cancer. This has resulted in less-than-optimal care for individual patients.
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Study shows that third gene is indicator for breast cancer
The New York Times
From Aug. 13: Mutations in a gene called PALB2 raise the risk of breast cancer in women by almost as much as mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the infamous genes implicated in most inherited cases of the disease, a team of researchers reported. Previous data had indicated that mutations in PALB2 were linked to breast cancer, and many genetic tests already screen for them, but it had not been clear to what extent these mutations raised a carrier's odds of developing the disease.
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The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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