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Happy New Year from ACS! As a continuation of last week's top 10 most accessed articles in 2014, here's the next 10 for your reading pleasure. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 7.

A possible explanation for why brain tumors are more common, and more harmful, in males
Oncology Nurse Advisor
From Aug. 20: New research helps explain why brain tumors occur more often in males and frequently are more harmful than similar tumors in females. For example, glioblastomas, the most common malignant brain tumors, are diagnosed twice as often in males, who suffer greater cognitive impairments than females and do not survive as long. The researchers found that retinoblastoma protein (RB), a protein known to reduce cancer risk, is significantly less active in male brain cells than in female brain cells.
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New study raises questions about antioxidant use in lung cancer patients
The Washington Post
From Feb. 5: The supermarket labels touting the benefits of antioxidant-rich foods such as frozen berries and green tea are so ubiquitous that many people assume that taking extra doses in the form of supplements is beneficial. But a growing body of evidence, including a study published recently, suggests that high doses may do more harm than good in patients with certain types of cancer. Researchers in Sweden gave vitamin E supplements and a drug called acetylcysteine to mice with early stages of lung cancer, expecting to slow the tumors' growth. Instead, the opposite occurred — the tumors multiplied and grew more aggressively.
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Breast cancer vaccine shows promise in slowing progress
TIME
From Dec. 3: An initial safety trial of a breast cancer vaccine has proven safe, with preliminary results suggesting the vaccine will slow cancer progression. The vaccine, which is being developed by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is meant for patients with breast cancers that express a protein found only in breast tissue called mammaglobin-A.
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Large-scale study reinforces value of screenings for colorectal cancer prevention
Chicago Tribune
From April 9: Among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Deaths from colorectal cancer could be cut in half if people 50 years of age and older underwent routine colonoscopy screenings, said Sanath Kumar, MD, a colorectal surgeon on staff at Advocate South Suburban Hospital in Hazel Crest, Ill. A recent analysis of medical data from nearly 90,000 people strongly reinforces the importance of Dr. Kumar's recommendation.
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Registration now open for Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Chicago on February 27, 2015. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards can be used as a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer.


Factors contributing to pancreatic cancer identified
Oncology Nurse Advisor
From Nov. 5: New research that provides a better understanding of pancreatic cancer may help identify those people at increased risk. Pancreatic cancer is a stealthy cancer that is usually detected at very late stages and has a five-year survival rate of less than five percent. Strategies that might help identify which persons have an increased risk of developing the disease are sorely needed. Some cases seem to run in families, but the genes that are responsible for such inherited predisposition remain largely unknown.
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Cost of treating skin cancer is skyrocketing
Consumer Affairs
From Nov. 19: Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States and has become a growing public health problem in the past few years. Not only is the number of skin cancer cases growing, the cost of treating the disease is surging. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now says skin cancer treatment costs increased five times faster than treatments for other cancers between 2002 and 2011. The average annual cost of skin cancer treatment was $3.6 billion during 2002-2006. That number grew to $8.1 billion in the years 2007 through 2011, an increase of 126 percent.
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Exercise 'aids cancer prognosis'
Nursing Times
From Jan. 22: Exercise may improve the prognosis of prostate cancer patients by affecting blood vessels in their tumors, a study suggests. Researchers found that men who walked at a fast pace before being diagnosed with the disease had tumors containing larger and more regularly shaped blood vessels. Better-formed tumor blood vessels may in turn inhibit cancer aggressiveness and promote better responses to treatments, the scientists believe.
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Study: Breast cancer drug Herceptin linked to risk of heart problems
HealthDay via U.S. News & World Report
From June 11: As many as one in 10 women taking the breast cancer drug trastuzumab (Herceptin) will experience some type of heart problem, according to new research. The good news from this study is that these problems typically reverse once treatment is finished. "The overall message here is one of tremendous reassurance," said study researcher Dr. Brian Leyland-Jones, vice-president of molecular and experimental medicine at Avera Cancer Institute in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
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Prostate cancer patients face higher risk of second malignancies
Renal & Urology News
From July 30: Prostate cancer (PCa) patients are at increased risk for secondary primary malignancies compared with the general population, a study found. In this study of 20,558 PCa patients in Zurich, Switzerland, 1,718 developed a second primary tumor after their PCa diagnosis, most frequently lung and colon cancer (15 percent and 13 percent, respectively).
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Prostate cancer 'could be transmitted sexually'
WebMD
From May 28: Prostate cancer might be a sexually transmitted disease caused by a common infection, according to a study. Experts say the research has limitations and is not proof, though. Scientists at the University of California found evidence of a link between prostate cancer and the STD trichomoniasis, in which a common parasite is passed on during unprotected sexual contact.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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