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With 2013 coming to a close, AEG would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a very safe and happy holiday season.

As we reflect on the past year, we would like to provide the subscribers with a look at the most-read news stories.

Your regular news publication will resume on Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014.


Historical rock falls in Yosemite National Park, California
(1857-2011)

U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service
From July 3: The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of the Interior, along with the National Park Service, have prepared a report offering a brief summary of previous and current work on documenting rock falls in Yosemite National Park. It then describes each of the organizational categories in the inventory database, including event location, type of slope movement, date, volume, relative size, probable trigger, impact to humans, narrative description, references, and environmental conditions.
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ADWR's Land Subsidence Monitoring Program
Arizona Department of Water Resources
From Aug. 1: In 1997, numerous nonexempt wells were proposed in the Apache Junction and Luke Air Force Base areas, both areas noted for significant historic land subsidence and earth fissuring. Arizona Department of Water Resources management had concerns over the potential for the new wells to cause unreasonable increasing harm which led to a Directorate level decision to begin a land subsidence monitoring program. As a result, Geophysics/Surveying Unit of the Hydrology Division was created and started monitoring land subsidence by collecting survey-grade GPS data on survey monuments in the Hawk Rock land subsidence area located in east Mesa and Apache Junction.
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New look at what lies beneath Hawaii
LiveScience
From July 11: The hotspot feeding Hawaii's volcanoes may look like one of two lava lamp bubbles — an oval blob or a long, stretched-out plume. With direct access to the mantle still the stuff of science fiction, scientists have argued for decades about the shape and size of Hawaii's hotspot. Is it shallow, or does it rise from deep in the Earth? Now, a new look under the islands seems to refute the shallow mantle model.
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17 photos of lava that will totally melt your mind
The Huffington Post
From Sept. 26: Gooey, goopy, oozey — even the words that describe lava are pretty spectacular. Feast your eyes on 17 photos of the molten stuff of gods.
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Port Townsend bluff collapse caught on video
KING-TV
From Oct. 24: VideoBriefCharles Steurer and his girlfriend went for a walk on the beach near Port Townsend and ended up being eyewitnesses to a natural wonder. They were at the base of the bluffs when a section of the bluff began to crumble away. What they saw next was captured on video by the owner of the local newspaper.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Giant quake sloshed fjords half a world away
EARTH Magazine
On the morning of March 11, 2011, Leif Hus and his wife Gry Melas Hus were having breakfast in their kitchen overlooking Sognefjord in Leikanger, Norway. It was low tide on a calm and windless day with near-freezing temperatures. As they stood, coffee cups in hand, looking out the window at the fjord, they saw an unusual wave roll in.

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AEG: Meet Kristen Enzweiler
AEG
The AEG Insider is proud to announce that we will feature short bios for either one of the six AEG Insider editors or a leader in the AEG community. Here is an introduction to one of the AEG leaders — Kristen Enzweiler.



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Interactive: Oklahoma quakes
The New York Times
Oklahoma has been jolted by thousands of minor earthquakes in recent years, far more than the average of about 50 quakes a year. Scientists are investigating whether the oil and gas industry's practice of injecting wastewater into deep wells might be causing some of the quakes.

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False geoengineering promises lead to human vulnerabilities, ecological
integrity risk

Energy Reality
From Nov. 21: It is beyond dispute that cumulative, local interventions in ecosystems can bring about planetary-level effects. That's why we have human-induced climate change. However, another notion is quickly gaining ground: That we can use geoengineering to purposefully intervene to correct the unintentional harm human activity has done to the climate.
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The unusually large Bingham Canyon Mine landslide: An impressive
example of prediction using monitoring

American Geophysical Union
From April 18: On April 10, an extremely large landslide occurred in the Bingham Canyon copper mine in Utah. According to various news reports, the deforming slope was identified some months ago and monitored intensively. An increasing rate of strain in the hours before failure indicated that a collapse was imminent, and the mining company released a warning about the landslide in advance.
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Oil shale: Looming threat to western wild lands
Post Carbon Institute via Energy Reality
From Nov. 28: Oil shales, if they live up to proponents' expectations and can be produced commercially, could change the economic and political fortunes of the United States and transform the geopolitical map of the world. But any large-scale effort to exploit oil shales will threaten wildlife habitat and water quality, and exacerbate climate change.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    USGS awarded funds to support Superstorm Sandy relief (American Geosciences Institute)
Giant quake sloshed fjords half a world away (EARTH Magazine)
Holiday calendar: Grand Canyon, seen and unseen (NBC News)
AEG: Meet Kristen Enzweiler (AEG)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Potential targets for shale-oil and shale-gas exploration in Arizona
Arizona Geological Survey
From July 25: The recent development of horizontal drilling techniques and application of hydraulic fracturing to horizontal wells has dramatically increased oil and gas production in the U.S., notably in areas with extensive organic-rich shale and calcareous shale deposits.
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Iowa meteorite crater confirmed: USGS airborne surveys back up
previous Decorah research

U.S. Geological Survey via ScienceDaily
From March 14: Recent airborne geophysical surveys near Decorah, Iowa are providing an unprecedented look at a 470- million-year-old meteorite crater concealed beneath bedrock and sediments.
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Views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those officially representing the Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists except where expressly stated.
 

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