This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit December 26, 2014

Home   About AEG   Foundation   Sections/Chapters   Students/Educators   Resources   Contact Us      


 


HERE'S TO A NEW YEAR!

With 2014 coming to a close, The AEG Insider would like to wish its subscribers, partners and other industry professionals a very safe and happy holiday season.


As we reflect on the past year, we would like to provide the subscribers with a look at the most-read news stories. Your regular news publication will resume on Thursday, Jan. 8.



In the meantime, visit www.aegweb.org for association updates.



An anthropogenic marker horizon in the future rock record
The Geological Society of America
From June 5: Recognition of increasing plastic debris pollution over the last several decades has led to investigations of the imminent dangers posed to marine organisms and their ecosystems, but very little is known about the preservation potential of plastics in the rock record. As anthropogenically derived materials, plastics are astonishingly abundant in oceans, seas and lakes, where they accumulate at or near the water surface, on lake and ocean bottoms and along shorelines. The burial potential of plastic debris is chiefly dependent on the material's density and abundance, in addition to the depositional environment. Here, it is reported the appearance of a new "stone" formed through intermingling of melted plastic, beach sediment, basaltic lava fragments and organic debris from Kamilo Beach on the island of Hawaii.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


'Climate Change: Evidence and Choices' PDF available
The National Academies via AEG
From March 13: The U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society has jointly prepared a 36-page report, "Climate Change: Evidence & Choices," a free PDF file written by an international panel of climate-change scientists jointly from both the Royal Society and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. It was peer-reviewed by another independent panel of experts, then released for the general public.

The booklet takes the form of 20 questions and qnswers, with rich use of colored graphics, charts and diagrams. We have all read various books and reports and watched news reports on climate change. This is a well-written authoritative report that provides the current 2014 evidence.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry. Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes.

gtech.mst.edu
 


Spectacular time-lapsed dam 'removal' video
National Geographic
From March 13: The White Salmon River in Washington state is flowing again as the nearly 100-year-old Condit Dam was disabled with explosives. The reservoir draining took about two hours. The event is a significant milestone for river restoration and dam removal nationwide.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


By itself, abundant shale gas unlikely to alter climate projections
Duke University
From Jan. 9: While natural gas can reduce greenhouse emissions when it is substituted for higher-emission energy sources, abundant shale gas is not likely to substantially alter total emissions without policies targeted at greenhouse gas reduction, a pair of Duke researchers find.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Dramatic photographs of the Hastings cliff collapse
American Geophysical Union
From Jan. 16: The Hastings and St. Leonard Observer, an English newspaper, has published two very interesting photographs of the coastal cliff collapse at Rock-a-Nore in Hastings, England, which was caught on video. The images were taken by a local man, Dan Crouch.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Oso landslide — AEG members respond
AEG
From April 3: The recent tragedy in Oso, Washington, brings home the important work our profession does to protect the public. Unfortunately, we were not able to save those that perished in this recent event, and we wish to express our deepest sympathy to the families and community of Oso.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Geologists unravel mystery of new crater found in southern Utah
KSL-TV
From Sept. 4: Farmers in southern Utah are scratching their heads and trying to figure out what caused an unusual phenomenon in an irrigation pond. Gary Dalton of Circleville recently discovered a mysterious crater that suddenly appeared under the water.

Experts from the Utah Geological Survey took a look and were initially baffled. "Well, yeah, we've got several theories," said veteran geologist and AEG member Bill Lund as he examined the pond. "Most of them have gone up in smoke."

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Sinkhole beneath National Corvette Museum devours 8 cars
GeoPrac.net
From Feb. 20: A 40-foot-diameter sinkhole 30 feet deep opened up beneath the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky, and swallowed eight of the Corvettes on display. The museum's security company alerted the staff members that the motion sensors had gone off at about 5:40 a.m. on Feb. 12 in the "SkyDome" portion of the museum, separate from the main building.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Aerial footage of destructive rock fall in Italy
Tareom via YouTube
VideoBrief From Jan. 30: The following is a documentary about the devastating rock fall on Jan. 21 in Termeno (South Tyrol), Italy.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Researchers: Supervolcanoes can erupt 'spontaneously'
The Huffington Post
From Feb. 13: Scientists looking for a greater understanding of what causes supervolcanoes to erupt have come to an unsettling conclusion: They can erupt spontaneously and without any external trigger. Researchers based at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, sought to understand what external impacts — like an earthquake, for instance — would trigger the eruption of a supervolcano, such as the one in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

The AEG Insider
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Damon Sayles, Senior Editor, 469.420.2662  
Contribute news


View the latest issues of the AEG NEWS and
the Environmental & Engineering Geoscience journal.

Do you have content you would like to see in the Insider? Do you have a question regarding one of the stories featured here or would like more information about a specific topic? We always welcome your feedback and submissions. Email us at enews@aegweb.org to submit questions or suggestions to the AEG Editors.

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AEG Insider was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
Dec. 18, 2014
Dec. 11, 2014
Dec. 4, 2014
Connect with AEG:        



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063