This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit Jan. 7, 2014

Home   Membership   Events   Licensure   Educators   Jobs   Resources   Foundation   Contact      


 

Geologists identify trigger for apocalyptic 'super eruptions'
The Guardian
Super eruptions make those from normal volcanoes look like sputters of dust. They blast enough material into the air to bury large cities beneath kilometers of ash, and the particles they send into the sky can cool the planet for years. But the most alarming aspect of these rare and violent events, which have left deep scars on the planet's surface, is that the forces that drive them have never been understood. Until now.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Sea floor map result stuns experts
The New Zealand Herald
VideoBriefNew 3-D mapping has revealed remarkable features of a sprawling submerged ridge east of Auckland, New Zealand — a feat one scientist says is the undersea equivalent of Captain Cook mapping the coastline of New Zealand. Little was known about the Colville Ridge, stretching more than 200 kilometers towards Fiji, until a recent research voyage enabled marine geologists to map it in detail for the first time.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Geologists find the cause of earthquake lights
Examiner.com
Geologists have determined the cause of earthquake lights and may be able to use the rare phenomenon to predict earthquakes before they happen according to their research published in the Jan. 2, 2014, issue of the journal Seismological Research Letters.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG NEWS


Pay 2014 dues online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2014 in accordance with the Bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2014. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Request for 2014 National Awards nominations
AIPG
Send in your nominations for the AIPG 2014 National Awards due Jan. 20.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG young professional member documents
AIPG
AIPG has published over 230 articles and other documents specifically addressing student and young professionals in The Professional Geologist and as independent documents over the years. These articles have been collected along with a topical index of the articles that will assist in locating specific articles and documents addressing a specific topic.

Included in this collection are all of the Student's Voice columns, the articles for students published in the January issue of the TPG over the past several years, other student-authored articles, etc. Over the years, a wealth of useful information and advice is included in this collection, which will be updated as each issue of the TPG is published.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Accepting applications for the position of AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The successful candidate will succeed the current director who has announced his intent to retire. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
Moon dust mystery solved with help of Apollo mission data
The Huffington Post
A revisited trove of data from NASA's Apollo missions more than 40 years ago is helping scientists answer a lingering lunar question: How fast does moon dust build up? The answer: It would take 1,000 years for a layer of moon dust about a millimeter (0.04 inches) thick to accumulate. That's 10 times faster than scientists previously believed.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
20 ancient supervolcanoes discovered in Utah and Nevada
Sci-News.com
Geologists from Brigham Young University, Berkeley Geochronology Center and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have found evidence of twenty ancient supervolcanoes near the Utah-Nevada border. The newly discovered supervolcanoes aren't active today, but 30 million years ago more than 5,500 cubic km of magma erupted during a one-week period near a place called Wah Wah Springs.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Geologists find diamond-producing rocks in Antarctica
io9
For the first time ever, geologists working in Antarctica have found a type of rock that's known to bear diamonds — a discovery that could expose the polar continent to opportunistic prospectors. Called kimberlite, it's a volcanic rock that appears in vertical structures called kimberlite pipes — the single most important source of mined diamonds today.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more




INDUSTRY NEWS


Noises, shakes from little-known frostquakes create more questions than answers
Watertown Daily Times
A booming noise. A hefty rumble. In the cold of winter, many across Canada's north country and Ontario are reporting incidents nicknamed frostquakes, a figurative shuddering of the ground as it reacts to frozen moisture under its surface. "People think they're earthquakes, but they're not," said Frank A. Revetta, a geology professor at SUNY Potsdam. The events, also known as cryoseisms, take place as the moisture enters into rocks. As temperatures drop, the moisture freezes and expands, creating a high level of pressure released with the cracking of the rocks.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How GPS can keep track of earthquakes and flooding
MIT Technology Review
We usually think of GPS as a way to find out where we are and how to get where we're going. But over the past couple of years, researchers have discovered that GPS, when combined with sensors such as accelerometers and barometers, can be an important tool for evaluating and possibly predicting earthquakes and flash floods.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study develops Fayetteville shale reserves, production forecast
Oil & Gas Journal
A study of reserve and production potential for the Fayetteville shale in north central Arkansas, forecasts a cumulative 18 tcf of economically recoverable reserves by 2050, with production declining to about 400 bcf/year by 2030 from the current peak of about 950 bcf/year. The forecast suggests the formation will continue to be a major contributor to U.S. natural gas production.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Washington state fault has geologists planning
The Spokesman-Review
A series of mild to moderate earthquakes in north Spokane, Wash., in 2001 was the first sign of an active earthquake fault in the region previously unknown to scientists. Geologists continue to study the fault, which some researchers have named the Spokane Fault. "For us, it's an interesting puzzle to figure out," Brian Sherrod, a research geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Alabama town celebrates every new year with a falling meteor
Universe Today
VideoBriefThe central region of Alabama region has a history of meteorite impacts, including a massive impact over 84 million years ago. The town of Wetumpka sits in the middle of an ancient 8-kilometer-wide impact crater that was blasted into the bedrock, creating the unique geology of what is now Elmore County. To celebrate this "striking" heritage, Wetumpka celebrates every New Year's Eve with a spectacular recreation of a falling, exploding meteor.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The world's 2nd largest oil field, as seen from space
Scientific American
NASA caught a glimpse of Kuwait's Greater Burgan field in southeastern Kuwait. Situated about 40 kilometers south of Kuwait City, the Greater Burgan field is thought to hold nearly a tenth of the world's proven oil reserves and second only to Saudi Arabia's Ghawar field. Greater Burgan produces around 1.6 million barrels of oil per day (1 barrel = 42 gallons).
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

AIPG eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
View media kit

Jason Zimmerman, Content Editor, 469.420.2604   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AIPG eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Jan. 7, 2014
Dec. 31, 2013
Dec. 24, 2013
Dec. 17, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063